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Home > Main Library > Human Rights > Disappearances > Disappearences: reports of violations in Burma

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Disappearences: reports of violations in Burma

Individual Documents

Title: Par Gyi Killing Highlights Continuing Impunity in Southeast Myanmar Press release (Burmese and English)
Date of publication: 06 November 2014
Description/subject: The recent killing by the Myanmar Army of the journalist Aung Kyaw Naing, also known as Par Gyi, highlights the need to end impunity in Southeast Myanmar, according to the Karen Human Rights Group (KHRG), a leading community based organisation in the region.
Language: English
Source/publisher: Karen Human Rights Group (KHRG)
Format/size: html, pdf (134K-Burmese;176K-English)
Alternate URLs: http://www.khrg.org/sites/default/files/khrg_ko_par_gyi_press_release_burmese_version.pdf
http://www.burmalibrary.org/KHRG/KHRG%202014/KHRG-2014-11-06b-Par_Gyi_Killing_Press_Release-bu.pdf
http://www.khrg.org/sites/default/files/khrg_ko_par_gyi_press_release_english_version.pdf
http://www.burmalibrary.org/KHRG/KHRG%202014/KHRG-2014-11-06-Par_Gyi_Killing_Press_Release-en.pdf
Date of entry/update: 29 November 2014


Title: BURMA/MYANMAR: Military attempting to cover-up journalist’s death in custody
Date of publication: 30 October 2014
Description/subject: "Par Gyi, a 49-year-old freelance journalist, and former bodyguard of opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, travelled to Kyaikmayaw town, Mon State, to reporting on recent conflicts between the Burmese army and Kayan rebels in the area. In end September 2014, he disappeared. In time, other journalists in the area, discovered that Par Gyi had been arrested on 30 September 2014 by a group of military personnel, headed by Captain San Min Aung, of the Light Infantry Battalion (LIB) 208, which is based in the area from where the victim disappeared. The military claimed that Par Gyi had been arrested because he had been suspected to be an affiliate of Klohtoobaw Karen Organisation (KKO), part of the Democratic Karen Benevolent Army (DKBA). On 19 October 2014, Par Gyi’s wife, Than Dar, along with four other people, went to LIB 208 to enquire about her husband. The group met with Captain San Min Aung. The Captain said that when the military arrested Par Gyi, Minister of Border Affairs was also present. However, the Captain stated that he had no idea about the whereabouts of Par Gyi. Than Dar’s group contacted the Minister by telephone. But, the Minister only suggested that they contact the Army’s South Eastern Command for information. The group did just that. They requested permission to meet Staff Officer Grade 1 in the Army’s South Eastern Command. And, they were given an appointment for 20 October 2014 at 8 a.m. However, when they returned to the area on the 20th, the Staff Officer was unable to meet with them..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Asian Human Rights Commission
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 26 April 2015


Title: Burma Human Rights Yearbook 2008 - Chapter 1: Arbitrary Detention & Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances
Date of publication: 23 November 2009
Description/subject: "...Throughout 2008 Burma’s military junta maintained its campaign of oppression and tyranny against ordinary Burmese citizens, ethnic minorities, monks, political opposition groups and pro-democracy activists. Arrests and detention continued against, and were shaped by, a milieu of extremely significant national events. In August and September 2007, protests against the price increases of fuel erupted throughout Burma. Pro-democracy activists led the initial demonstrations in Burma’s main city, Rangoon. Approximately 400 people marched on 19 August 2007, in what turned out to be the largest demonstration in the military-ruled nation for several years. The authorities moved swiftly to quell the protests, rapidly arresting dozens of activists. Nonetheless, protests continued around the country. Numbers were small, but demonstrations were held in Rangoon, Sittwe and other prominent towns. The protests culminated with the Saffron Revolution; tens of thousands of Buddhist monks joined in a number of protests from 17-26 September. In the brutal crackdown which followed, many were killed and mass arbitrary arrests were carried out. Thousands of activists and monks were arrested and held in makeshift detention compounds..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Human Rights Docmentation Unit (HRDU)
Format/size: pdf (895K)
Date of entry/update: 05 December 2009


Title: Burma Human Rights Yearbook 2002-03: Arbitrary Detention and Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances
Date of publication: October 2003
Description/subject: "Throughout 2002, SPDC personnel continued to arbitrarily detain persons across Burma for illegal association with groups seen as anti-government. In the aftermath of the ‘global war on terror,’ the SPDC began to structure its anti-opposition activity within the framework of countering terrorist organizations. In areas of ethnic insurgency, these detentions were common and in most cases individuals suspected of such illegal association were seized, detained, interrogated, and sometimes tortured and killed without warrant or evidence against them. In 2002, there were also numerous reports of individuals who disappeared following arrest and detention, many of whom are feared dead. Human rights organizations, such as the Karen Human Rights Group (KHRG), have argued that the current definition of ‘political prisoner’ used in the context of Burma is too narrow and excludes the thousands of ethnic minority villagers who are routinely arrested, tortured, and imprisoned under Articles 17/1 (contact with illegal organizations) and Article 17/2 (rising against the State)..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Human Rights Documentation Unit of the NCGUB
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 10 November 2003


Title: Burma Human Rights Yearbook 2001-2002: Arbitrary Detention and Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances
Date of publication: September 2002
Description/subject: "In Burma the SPDC maintains an extensive network of MIS, police and government officials ready to detain anyone suspected of holding or expressing anti-government opinions. The military in Burma has established and enforced laws curtailing civil and political freedoms and utilized laws that allow it to crush any political opposition. The SPDCs laws and regulations criminalize freedom of thought, the dissemination of information and the right of association and assembly. The most commonly employed laws banning the demonstration of civil and political rights have been the 1923 Governments Official Secrets Act, the 1950 Emergency Provisions Act, the 1957 Unlawful Associations Act, the 1962 Printers and Publishers Registration Law, the 1975 State Protection Law, and Law No. 5/96. These laws and orders have restricted the civil and political rights of Burmese citizens for years; now, with technological advances available across the globe, new laws have been enacted in order to provide the SPDC authorities additional legal bases to curtail freedom of expression and the exchange of information. For more information on these laws, please refer to the chapters on the freedom of expression and the freedom of assembly and association..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Human Rights Documentation Unit of the NCGUB
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: Burma Human Rights Yearbook 2000: Arbitrary Detention and Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances
Date of publication: October 2001
Description/subject: "...In the year 2000 there remained an estimated 2,500 political prisoners in Burmas notorious jails. (Amnesty International and other international NGOs estimated this number to be 1,600) These individuals were being held in various prisons across Burma, suffering as a consequence of their involvement in the Burmese struggle for freedom and democracy. The living and social conditions of these political prisoners are grim and deteriorating daily..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Human Rights Documentation Unit, NCGUB
Format/size: html
Alternate URLs: Main Page of the Yearbook: http://www.ibiblio.org/obl/docs/yearbooks/Main.htm
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: Burma Human Rights Yearbook 1999-2000: 09 - Arbitrary Detention, Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances
Date of publication: August 2000
Language: English
Source/publisher: Human Rights Documentation Unit of the NCGUB
Format/size: pdf (137K)
Date of entry/update: 23 November 2003


Title: Burma Human Rights Yearbook 1994: 03 - Arbitrary Detention and Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances
Date of publication: September 1995
Language: English
Source/publisher: Human Rights Documentation Unit of the NCGUB
Format/size: html (77K)
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003