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Women of Burma -- bibliographies

Individual Documents

Title: If I Really Try Hard Nothing Is Impossible: From Collecting Recyclables to Higher Education
Date of publication: 15 December 2014
Description/subject: "Naw Eh is an incredibly determined 20-year-old Karen woman whose perseverance, motivation and hopeful spirit have taken her far beyond what she ever could have imagined as a child. Growing up as an undocumented migrant under extreme poverty and lack of opportunity, unlike many others in Thailand young Naw Eh had no chance to go to school. Instead, she spent her mornings selling snacks to school children, before starting her daily round of looking after the household and collecting recyclables on the streets. Naw Eh was 12 years old when she finally had the opportunity to go to school. From childhood of labour, desperation and rejection by other children, Naw Eh’s determination has, incredibly, led her to study for an internationally recognised GED diploma on the Thailand-Burma border. This is her account on how education, trying incredibly hard, and never giving up, has changed her life and led her towards light and new opportunities."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Burma Link
Format/size: pdf
Date of entry/update: 18 March 2016


Title: Burmese Women Studies Bibliography
Date of publication: 08 March 2002
Language: English
Source/publisher: UC Berkeley Library
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: It’s something deep inside your heart…When you see your children dying of hunger
Description/subject: "Thazun is a courageous, beautiful and talented young Arakanese woman who talks openly about her life and experiences. Spending her childhood under conditions that many people around the world would find hard to believe, Thazun has never given up hope for a better life. Her father is a politician and always on the run from Burmese authorities, while her mother worked away for years with hundreds of other forced labourers. When growing up, Thazun didn’t know her father, and for over two years, five-year-old Thazun and her sister and brothers were left to survive on their own without their mother or anyone to look after them. When their mother was able to visit them, she found her children almost starved to death. And yet Thazun’s mother had no choice but to leave, unable to help her children or even know if they were still alive. As heartbreaking as her story may be, Thazun shows how determination and hope can lead towards light. This is the first part of her story."..."Thazun’s story is based on an interview with Burma Link."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Burma Link
Format/size: pdf
Date of entry/update: 15 March 2016


Title: Lway Chee Sangar: Reclaiming Rights After a Childhood of Labor, Hardship, and Conflict
Description/subject: "“We had never heard about human rights in the village,” Lway Chee Sangar tells me at the Palaung Women’s Organization (PWO) office in Mae Sot, Thailand. Sangar is 23 years old. The ethnic nationality group to which she belongs, called the Palaung or Ta’ang, has been caught in an armed struggle for self-determination against the brutal Burmese regime for the better part of the past five decades. Sangar began working with the PWO about three years ago when her parents, desperate to give her an opportunity to improve her life, sent her from their tiny, remote village in the northern Shan State of Burma to the PWO’s former training center in China. It took her a combined six months of training at the PWO to begin to grasp the idea that all humans have rights. Sangar’s story is speckled with brushes with conflict, starting from her birth. She was born on the run, when her parents had to flee their village due to an outbreak of fighting nearby. Today, the Ta’ang National Liberation Army (TNLA), the armed wing of the Palaung State Liberation Front, is fighting off Burmese offensives and combatting opium cultivation in Palaung areas, according to their statement. Civilians are often caught in the cross-fire. Burmese forces have been known to use brutal tactics against civilians in conflict areas, including deadly forced portering and forced labor, torture, killing, and extortion of money, supplies, and drugs."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Burma Link
Format/size: pdf
Date of entry/update: 18 March 2016


Title: PWO Part One: ‘It’s the women and children that are suffering’
Description/subject: "The northern Shan state, home to a majority of the Ta’ang people (referred to as ‘Palaung’ by others), is among the least accessible areas in Burma. These areas host some of the bloodiest conflict, the most poppy cultivation, extremely high rates of opium addiction, and crippling poverty. The Palaung Women’s Organization (PWO) has developed an impressive range of programs to empower Palaung women and support and advocate for their communities in the war-torn, drug-ravaged areas in northern Burma–all while combatting gender-discrimination and an epidemic of domestic violence. Three Palaung women, De De, Lway Yu Ni, and Lway Chee Sangar, each from a different Palaung village, sat down with us to speak about their lives, their struggles, and the work of the PWO."...See the Alternate link for part 2.
Language: English
Source/publisher: Burma Link
Format/size: pdf
Alternate URLs: http://www.burmalink.org/pwo-part-two-empowering-women-whilst-facing-conflict-poverty-opiate-epidem...
Date of entry/update: 18 March 2016


Title: Rakhaing Leader of the Guerrilla and the Peaceful Pro-Democracy Movement: Saw Mra Raza Linn
Description/subject: "In 1988 I was one of the active leaders of the democracy movement in the Rakhaing [Arakan] State. At that time I was a teacher. So I organized many people and delivered my first democracy speech at Wangabar Ground in Sittwe on 9th of August, 1988. But the government was very angry with me. On 21st of August we seized all government offices in my native town, Rathedaung, without any bloodshed. The government was angry and wanted to kill me. In 1988, September 18, they seized state power. At that time I was at Rathedaung, running the office and controlling my township. After they seized state power, many gun men came in the township and then they searched for me to kill me. They shouted: I want to kill Mra Raza Linn, putting the gun through her mouth! Something like that. They were shouting everywhere. Thousands and thousands of people, they were following me before the government seized state power. They all disappeared. There were only about ten or twelve people around me. So I thought at that time that if I want to continue my struggle I should not stay in Burma. I should go somewhere… So I decided to leave my native country and took shelter on the Bangladesh-Burma border… After they seized the power I told my colleagues I must leave my country. If you want to continue the struggle, follow me! I called them. So eleven men they followed with me. And then we crossed the Bay of Bengal with a small engine boat, and took shelter on the Bangladesh-Burma border. All of us became soldiers, eleven men together with me. All became soldiers..."..."This story is based on Saw Mra Raza Linn’s voice as she tells Burma Link about her experiences, struggles, successes, and dreams."...See the Alternate link for Burmese version.
Language: English and Burmese
Source/publisher: Burma Link
Format/size: pdf
Alternate URLs: http://burmese.burmalink.org/?p=2884
Date of entry/update: 15 March 2016