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Home > Main Library > Human Rights > Various Rights > Burma-related legislation and human rights issues in Thailand

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Burma-related legislation and human rights issues in Thailand

Websites/Multiple Documents

Title: Human Rights Committee
Description/subject: This page provides information on the procedures of the Human Rights Committee, the treaty body which administers the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. It also has a link to the text of the Covenant.
Language: English, Francais, Espanol, Russian, Arabic, Chinese
Source/publisher: United Nations
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 18 August 2004


Title: Search results for "Thailand" on the Amnesty International site
Description/subject: Many of the victims of human rights violations in Thailand are refugees and migrants from Burma
Language: English
Source/publisher: Amnesty International
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 22 August 2003


Title: Thai legislation
Description/subject: Various Thai laws and links to other sources
Language: English
Source/publisher: Law Library of Congress
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 23 February 2005


Title: Thailand's core document
Description/subject: This document forms part of the reports of Thailand to UN treaty bodies.
Language: English
Source/publisher: United Nations
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 18 August 2004


Individual Documents

Title: FEELING SMALL IN ANOTHER PERSON’S COUNTRY - The situation of Burmese migrant children in Mae Sot Thailand
Date of publication: February 2009
Description/subject: "...There are an estimated 200,000 Burmese children living in Thailand, many of whom are working, with 20% of the migrant workforce thought to consist of children aged 15 to 17 years of age. It was seen to be a standard practice for parents to send children out to work, especially once they have reached the age of 13 years and seen to be physically capable of bringing in extra income for the family. Children may voluntarily leave or be taken out of school to work alongside their parents in the factory or fields, as domestics or as service workers in shops and restaurants. Researchers have found that children working in Mae Sot factories and the agricultural area are subject to the worst forms of child labour, working long hours and being exposed to hazardous chemicals and conditions that are in direct violation of Thai labour law. The difficulty of obtaining registration and the work permit makes for a tenuous existence. Consequently, young people can be coerced or forced into bad employment situations... As parent’s lives are consumed by the need to work and make money, children can be denied the love, care and guidance essential to their healthy growth and development and may be separated from or even abandoned by parents. Some parents abuse and exploit their children by telling them not to come back home if they cannot earn a fixed amount per day. Consequently these children go out on the streets looking for daily work to survive; this can include begging, collecting recyclable rubbish and carrying heavy loads. This pressure is seen to change the moral character of children with some turning to stealing. Children who are unemployed, neglected, abandoned, or orphaned can end up permanently on the streets. Being out of school and on the streets increases the risk of being trafficked and recruitment by gangs, who physically threaten and may even kill children who try to escape... Statelessness is a real risk for children who are unable to receive identity registration in Burma and for those born in Thailand of migrants, especially unregistered parents. Despite the ratification of conventions, such as the United Nation’s Convention on the Rights of the Child 1989 (CRC), and the International Convention of Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR) that stipulate birth registration of all children born in Thailand, in reality only registered migrants who hold a work permit can register their child’s birth. A change in the Civil Registration Act, effective from the 23rd August 2008, will allow all children born on Thai soil, regardless of their status, to register their births and obtain a birth certificate; however it remains to be seen how this will be implemented. In the meantime the Committee for Promotion and Protection of Child Rights (Burma) (CPPCR), a Burmese CBO established in 2002, provides a registration service for children from Burma that in some cases, has been recognized by some Thai schools and the United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR)..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Committee for Promotion and Protection of Child Rights (Burma)
Format/size: pdf (3.4MB)
Date of entry/update: 23 November 2009


Title: Committee on the Rights of the Child, Thailand 2006 -- Concluding Observations
Date of publication: 27 January 2006
Description/subject: These concluding observations contain a number of comments and recommendations on refugee and other migrant children in Thailand, including the question of birth registration, the situation of domestic migrant workers etc.
Language: English
Source/publisher: United Nations
Format/size: pdf (548K - English; 176K - Spanish; 186K - French)
Date of entry/update: 17 November 2010


Title: Committee on the Rights of the Child, Thailand 2006: list of Thai delegation and statement
Date of publication: 04 January 2006
Language: English
Source/publisher: United Nations
Format/size: pdf
Date of entry/update: 28 January 2006


Title: The Mekong Challence - Working Day and Night: The Plight of Migrant Child Workers in Mae Sot, Thailand
Date of publication: 2006
Description/subject: "Migrant children in Mae Sot are faced with excessive working hours, lack of time off, and unhealthy proximity to dangerous machines and chemicals. They also endure the practice of debt bondage and the systematic seizure of their identification documents. Indeed many of these children in Mae Sot can most accurately be described as enduring the "worst forms of child labour, prohibited by the International Labour Organization's Convention No. 182 - a Convention that the Royal Thai Government ratified in February, 2001. These child workers reported that they were virtually forced to remain at the factory due to restrictions placed on their movements by factory owners, and by threats of arrest and harassment by police and other officials if they were stopped outside the factory gates. Put succinctly, Mae Sot has perfected a system where children are literally working day and night, week after week, for wages that are far below the legal minimum wage, to the point of absolute exhaustion..."
Author/creator: Philip S. Robertson Jr., Editor
Language: English
Source/publisher: International Labour Organisation
Format/size: pdf (4.45MB)
Alternate URLs: http://www.ilo.org/public/english/region/asro/bangkok/child/trafficking/downloads/workingdayandnigh...
Date of entry/update: 04 April 2007


Title: Concluding observations of the Human Rights Committee: Thailand (2005)
Date of publication: 28 July 2005
Language: English
Source/publisher: United Nations (CCPR/CO/84/THA)
Format/size: pdf
Date of entry/update: 22 December 2005


Title: Human Rights Committee: List of Issues - Thailand 2005
Date of publication: 13 April 2005
Description/subject: The list of issues the Committee sent to the Thai Government. The response to these questions will be the starting point for the July examionation of Thailand's report to the HRC.
Language: English
Source/publisher: United Nations (CCPR/C/84/L/THA.)
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 11 May 2005


Title: Selected documents on low levels of birth registration for certain groups in Thailand -- Submission to the Committee on the Rights of the Child regarding Articles 7 and 22 of the CRC.
Date of publication: April 2005
Description/subject: CONTENTS: A. Background: Birth registration and the Hill Tribes, Burmese migrants and trafficking... 1) Vulnerability of children lacking birth registration in Thailand; 2) Birth registration of hill tribe communities in Thailand ; 3) Extracts on Thailand from "Lives on Hold: The Human Cost of Statelessness”; 4) Extracts from “No Status: Migration, Trafficking & Exploitation of Women in Thailand”; 5) Extracts from an NGO document on Burmese migrants; 6) An article from the Bangkok Post on birth registration; 7) UN and NGO letter on birth registration and trafficking to the Minister of Foreign Affairs... Thai Government Proposals: 1) Stateless People: Govt. to revamp processing of nationality applications; 2) Registering babies is just a start in life... B. Analysis: Birth Registration of Migrant Children Born in Thailand... C. Suggestions for the List of Issues... Annexes: A) Relevant Thai legislation (links to selected texts): 1) Thailand’s Nationality Act; 2) The Constitution of the Kingdom of Thailand; 3) Immigration Act of 1979; 4) Links to other Thai legislation... B) Thailand’s initial report to the Human Rights Committee - The section on Article 24 (paras 612-623)... C) The Committee on the Rights of the Child: its concerns about birth registration in Thailand: 1) Thailand’s reservation on Article 7; 2) The CRC on the reservation; 3) Discussion of the reservation in Thailand’s 2nd report to the CRC.
Language: English
Source/publisher: Burma Peace Foundation
Format/size: pdf (320K)
Date of entry/update: 21 August 2006


Title: Submission to the Human Rights Committee regarding Article 24 of the ICCPR - Selected documents on low levels of birth registration for certain groups in Thailand
Date of publication: March 2005
Description/subject: "This preliminary collection of documents is submitted to the Human Rights Committee in advance of its examination of Thailand’s initial report, to raise the issue of the groups in Thailand whose children, in violation of Article 24 of the Covenant, tend not to be registered at birth, and are thus exposed to statelessness and many forms of difficulties and abuse... CONTENTS: A. Background: Birth registration and the Hill Tribes, Burmese migrants and trafficking; 1) Vulnerability of children lacking birth registration in Thailand; 2) Birth registration of hill tribe communities in Thailand ; 3) Extracts on Thailand from "Lives on Hold: The Human Cost of Statelessness”; 4) Extracts from “No Status: Migration, Trafficking & Exploitation of Women in Thailand”; 5) Extracts from an NGO document on Burmese migrants; 6) An article from the Bangkok Post on birth registration; 7) UN and NGO letter on birth registration and trafficking to the Minister of Foreign Affairs... Thai Government Proposals: 1) Stateless People: Govt. to revamp processing of nationality applications; 2) Registering babies is just a start in life... B. Analysis: Birth Registration of Migrant Children Born in Thailand... C. Suggested orientation of the question(s) for the List of Issues... Annexes: A) Relevant Thai legislation (links to selected texts); 1) Thailand’s Nationality Act; 2) The Constitution of the Kingdom of Thailand; 3) Immigration Act of 1979; 4) Links to other Thai legislation... B) Thailand’s initial report to the Human Rights Committee -- The section on Article 24 (paras 612-623)... C) The Committee on the Rights of the Child: its concerns about birth registration in Thailand; 1) Thailand’s reservation on Article 7; 2) The CRC on the reservation; 3) Discussion of the reservation in Thailand’s 2nd report to the CRC.
Language: English
Source/publisher: Burma Peace Foundation
Format/size: pdf (321K)
Date of entry/update: 21 August 2006


Title: NO STATUS: MIGRATION, TRAFFICKING & EXPLOITATION OF WOMEN IN THAILAND
Date of publication: 14 July 2004
Description/subject: I. Executive Summary; II. Introduction; III. Thailand: Background. IV. Burma: Background. V. Project Methodology; VI. Findings: Hill Tribe Women and Girls in Thailand; Burmese Migrant Women and Girls in Thailand; VII. Law and Policy – Thailand; VIII. Applicable International Human Rights Law; IX. Law and Policy – United States X. Conclusion and Expanded Recommendations..."This study was designed to provide critical insight and remedial recommendations on the manner in which human rights violations committed against Burmese migrant and hill tribe women and girls in Thailand render them vulnerable to trafficking,2 unsafe migration, exploitative labor, and sexual exploitation and, consequently, through these additional violations, to HIV/AIDS. This report describes the policy failures of the government of Thailand, despite a program widely hailed as a model of HIV prevention for the region. Physicians for Human Rights (PHR) findings show that the Thai government's abdication of responsibility for uncorrupted and nondiscriminatory law enforcement and human rights protection has permitted ongoing violations of human rights, including those by authorities themselves, which have caused great harm to Burmese and hill tribe women and girls..."
Author/creator: Karen Leiter, Ingrid Tamm, Chris Beyrer, Moh Wit, Vincent Iacopino,. Holly Burkhalter, Chen Reis.
Language: English
Source/publisher: Physicians for Human Rights
Format/size: pdf (853K)
Date of entry/update: 19 July 2004


Title: Thailand’s Second State Party Report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child
Date of publication: 07 June 2004
Description/subject: Thailand’s Second Report On The Implementation of the Convention On the Rights of the Child Submitted to The United Nations Committee on the Rights of the Child... by The Sub-committee on the Rights of the Child; The National Youth Commission; The Office of Welfare Promotion, Protection and Empowerment of Vulnerable Groups; Ministry of Social Development and Human Security... Contents: Introduction; 1. General Measures of Implementation; 2. Definition of the Child; 3. General Principles; 4. Civil Rights and Freedoms; 5. Family Environment and Alternative Care; 6. Basic Health and Welfare; 7. Education, Leisure and Cultural Activities; 8. Special Protection Measures.
Language: English
Source/publisher: United Nations (CRC/C/83/Add.15)
Format/size: pdf (923K), Word (884K)
Date of entry/update: 10 August 2004


Title: Hitmen Target Burmese Rights Champion
Date of publication: June 2004
Description/subject: "Angry Thai factory owners are “out to kill me” says a Burmese labor leader in Thailand. Moe Swe must die! That’s the chilling message this outspoken champion of Burmese workers’ rights in Thailand says is being put about by angry Thai factory owners..."
Author/creator: Kyaw Zwa Moe
Language: English
Source/publisher: "The Irrawaddy" Vol. 12, No. 6
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 07 October 2004


Title: Concluding observations of the Committee on the Rights of the Child on Thailand's 1st report
Date of publication: 26 October 1998
Language: English
Source/publisher: United Nations (CRC/C/15/Add.97)
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 10 August 2004


Title: Examination of Thailand's 1st report to the CRC: Summary Records
Date of publication: 02 October 1998
Description/subject: These Summary records of the 3 meetings contain: 3 in Spanish, 2 in English, 1 in French. The main URL is the 1st meeting (English version). The date given is for the last meeting.
Language: English, French, Francais, French, Espanol, Spanish
Source/publisher: United Nations
Format/size: html
Alternate URLs: http://www.unhchr.ch/tbs/doc.nsf/(Symbol)/CRC.C.SR.494.En?Opendocument (English) http://www.unhchr.ch/tbs/doc.nsf/(Symbol)/CRC.C.SR.493.Sp?Opendocument (Spanish) http://www.unhchr.ch/tbs/doc.nsf/(Symbol)/CRC.C.SR.494.Sp?Opendocument (Spanish) http://www.unhchr.ch/tbs/doc.nsf/(Symbol)/CRC.C.SR.495.Sp?Opendocument (Spanish) http://www.unhchr.ch/tbs/doc.nsf/(Symbol)/CRC.C.SR.494.Fr?Opendocument (French)
Date of entry/update: 10 August 2004


Title: The Constitution of the Kingdom of Thailand
Date of publication: 11 October 1997
Description/subject: 1997, 2006 and 2007 versions
Language: English
Source/publisher: Govt. of Thailand
Format/size: html
Alternate URLs: http://www.isaanlawyers.com/constitution%20thailand%202007%20-%202550.pdf (2007 version)
Date of entry/update: 17 November 2010


Title: Thailand
Date of publication: 1992
Language: English
Source/publisher: “Nationality & Statelessness” Vol. II, IBHI Humanitarian Series, 1996
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 23 February 2005


Title: Asian Human Rights Commission - Thailand - [Thai Site]
Description/subject: This site has articles and reports in Thai and English about the human rights situation in Thailand. Many victims of these violations are refugees and migrants from Burma.
Language: Thai, English
Source/publisher: Asian Human Rights Commission
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 22 August 2003