VL.png The World-Wide Web Virtual Library
[WWW VL database || WWW VL search]
donations.gif asia-wwwvl.gif

Online Burma/Myanmar Library

Full-Text Search | Database Search | What's New | Alphabetical List of Subjects | Main Library | Reading Room | Burma Press Summary

Home > Main Library > Non-Burman and non-Buddhist groups > Ethnic groups in Burma (cultural, political) > Single Groups > Palaung (Ta'ang)

Order links by: Reverse Date Title

Palaung (Ta'ang)

Websites/Multiple Documents

Title: Palaung Women's Organisation website (English and Burmese)
Description/subject: What we believe: 'PWO believes that recognizing women’s rights and women participation in different level of political and social tasks is one of the processes of building a just society'... Organizational profile: The Palaung Women’s Organization (PWO) was established in 2000 in response to the dearth of women actively participating within other Palaung organizations. Cultural factors determined that men had greater access to training, better English language and computer skills, greater self-confidence and more leadership opportunities. PWO was formed with the intention of educating and empowering women so that they could develop and strengthen their own self-determination and achieve equality of participation.... PWO mission statement: We are Palaung women who will advocate and advance the statues of women in field of development and working forwards achieving gender equality, justice, peace and democratic society... Goal: To actively work towards the eliminating of all form of violence against women To develop and advance the status of Palaung women to actively participate in the political sphere To advocate toward the improvement of the health and well being of Palaung people To increase attention and response at the local, regional and international levels towards addressing Human Rights violations in the Palaung area... Programs and projects: Women's Political Development Program; Eliminating Violence Against Women Program; Health Program; Information Documentation and Research Department; Income Generation projects.
Language: English, Burmese
Source/publisher: Palaung Women's Organisation
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 25 January 2012


Title: Palaungland website (English and Burmese)
Description/subject: "The team of the Palaung Land Website provides the news and current affairs in English at website and in Burmese and Palaung language in the journal covering domestic news and events from the Palaung area and others in Northern Shan State. Our coverage aims to reflect diverse opinions and offers in-depth analysis, making sense of news events to the people. We are part of the Ta’ang Students and Youth Organization-(TSYO) under the Information and Documentation Program which has been implementing its project by collecting and documenting HRV information with data base and also we have been releasing news concerning human rights situation in Palaung area to different broadcasting center and media groups. We are collecting not only current information of human rights violation (HRV) but also the data of HRV committed by military regime in the past, during the period ceasefire agreement, the period that they forced to keep ceasefire with Palaung Army and in the Civil War cases as well. We aim to be a beacon, voice and herald through impartiality, journalistic freedom and quality for the Palaung people by collecting information from the Palaung area to disseminating to the world by website and to the Palaung audiences by publication. We established the Information Collecting Team named the Ta’aung Youth News Agency, TYNA since June 26, 2004 which included group of young Palaung people. Before TYNA was established, we published Ta’ang Youth News Letter and Journal. We established TYNA to become more independent on media dissemination and to monitor human rights situation in Palaung territory and other areas northern part of Shan State, Burma and to inform the international community about human rights violation situation in Palaung area. TYNA collects news and information from Palaung area and informs our Palaung people, democracy movement and international community who are conducting on Burma issues to know the real situation in our area. We attempt to report update news on the Palaung Land Website and publish Palaung Youth Journal base on the information we got..."
Language: Burmese, English
Source/publisher: Ta'ang Students and Youth Orgnaization (TSYO)
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 12 August 2011


Title: Voices of the People: "A Collection of Stories of people of Burma"
Description/subject: "These are Burma’s voices for change, extraordinary stories of people of Burma from all walks of life. Their experiences, struggles, fears, and successes. These are unheard stories of incredible spirit of resilience and courage, voices of hope and dreams that have emerged from decades of oppression. Help us spread these voices across the globe!"...Stories and voices from Karen, Karenni, Shan, Kachin, Chin, Rakhine, Mon, Palaung, Pa-O, Nagas and other ethnic minorities.
Language: English
Source/publisher: Burma Link
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 14 March 2016


Individual Documents

Title: We Are Not Rebels… We Fight for Democracy: Ta’ang (TNLA) Soldiers
Date of publication: 13 July 2015
Description/subject: "Ta’ang National Liberation Army (TNLA), the armed wing of Palaung State Liberation Front (PSLF), is one of the ethnic resistance armed organisations that vows not to lay down arms until there is a guarantee of political negotiations. Burma Link spoke with two TNLA soldiers, Mai and Mai Main, who were sent by their leaders to study human rights and politics in Mae Sot, so that they could go back to Ta’ang land and educate other soldiers. These two soldiers studied in Mae Sot for a year, and believed it is their responsibility to go back to Burma to educate others and safeguard their people’s rights. In this interview, they share their story on how and why they became involved with the TNLA and why the Ta’ang people so strongly support their army. Mai and Mai Main, aged 23 and 26, are now back in the battle fields of northern Shan State." ..."END NOTE: Although TNLA is a member of the ethnic alliance United Nationalities Federal Council (UNFC), the government has tried to exclude the group from the Nationwide Ceasefire Agreement (NCA) talks. TNLA is an ally of the Kachin Independence Army (KIA), and fights alongside the Arakan Army (AA) and the Myanmar National Democratic Alliance Army (MNDAA) in northern Shan State, to obtain freedom and to establish a genuine federal union. TNLA also fights to eliminate cultivation, production, sale and use of drugs in their traditional lands. Read more."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Burma Link
Format/size: pdf
Date of entry/update: 17 March 2016


Title: Ta’ang (Palaung) Leader Tar Aik Bong: ‘Without Proper Political Solutions, There Will Be No Lasting Peace’
Date of publication: 11 November 2014
Description/subject: "Tar Aik Bong is a leader of the Ta’ang (Palaung) people, one of Burma’s ethnic nationalities that continues a daily struggle for survival in largely inaccessible areas in northern Shan State. He joined the Ta’ang liberation movement in 1987, and currently serves as Chairman of Palaung State Liberation Front (PSLF) and Head of the military commission of Ta’ang National Liberation Army (TNLA). TNLA is one of the few ethnic armies that continues to fight against the Burma army and vows not to lay down arms until equal rights and a lasting political solution is achieved. TNLA fights to “obtain freedom for all Ta’ang nationals from oppression, to form Ta’ang autonomous regions that guarantee democracy and human rights, to oppose and fight against dictatorship and any form of racial discrimination, to attain national equality and self-determination and to establish a genuine Federal Union that guarantees Ta’ang autonomy and to eliminate cultivation, production, sale and use of narcotics.” Tar Aik Bong is also a member of the ethnic alliance United Nationalities Federal Council (UNFC) council and Foreign Affairs Department. In an exclusive interview with Burma Link, Tar Aik Bong talks about the causes and current situation of the Ta’ang conflict, the role of the UNFC, and the brutal tactics that the Burmese military uses against Ta’ang civilians in order to cut the opposition movement. Tar Aik Bong also discusses the Burmese military’s instrumental role in the epidemic drug usage in Ta’ang areas, and TNLA’s plan to eradicate the drugs."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Burma Link
Format/size: pdf
Date of entry/update: 18 March 2016


Title: Catalyst for Conflict - Investments cause renewed war, threatening Ta'ang communities in northern Burma
Date of publication: 22 May 2012
Description/subject: "Despite recent ceasefire agreements and talk of reform in Burma, since January 2012 ethnic Ta'ang areas of northern Burma have experienced increasing militarization and conflict. Fierce battles have broken out in areas that have not seen fighting for over 20 years. Soldiers from the Burma Army have moved from their main bases to live in villages and now regularly patrol local areas, increasing abuses against local populations including killings, beatings, forced labor, and extortion. The military expansion is directly linked to securing Chinese mega projects. Pipelines that will take oil and gas from Burma to China are currently being built in Ta'ang areas. China is also building two mega dams on the Shweli, the most important river for the Ta'ang, while loggers are cutting down precious teak forests in Ta'ang areas to export timber to China. Control over natural resources and abuses by the Burma Army are at the heart of local grievances in both Kachin and Shan states where conflict has erupted. in July 2011, a new army, the Ta'ang National Liberation Army (TNLA), was formed under the Palaung state Liberation Front (PSLF) to protect the Ta'ang people. in March this year, pro-government militias in Mantong were given Burma Army weapons to fight the TNLA, using a divide and rule tactic which creates conflict among the Ta'ang people. As fighting and abuses increase, local people are fleeing for their safety. Since December 2011, over 1,000 have become internally displaced, sheltering in Nam Kham and Mantong. Many have also fled to China, particularly young men avoiding forced conscription and portering. This has had devastating impacts on the annual tea harvest, a critical economic activity for the Ta'ang. People in northern Shan State, especially in rural areas, have failed to benefit from the much talked about reform in central Burma. Investments are increasing conflict and abuses while not providing benefit to local people.
Language: English, Burmese
Source/publisher: Ta'ang Students and Youth Organization
Format/size: pdf (English: 1.2MB-OBL version; 1.61MB-original; Burmese: 1.3MB-OBL version; 4.44MB-original)
Alternate URLs: http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs13/Catalyst_for_Conflict(bu)-red.pdf
http://www.palaungland.org/media/Report/catalystforconflict/English.pdf
http://www.palaungland.org/media/Report/catalystforconflict/Burmese.pdf
www.palaungland.org
Date of entry/update: 23 May 2012


Title: Voices for Change: Domestic Violence and Gender Discrimination in the Palaung Area (Burmese)
Date of publication: 25 November 2011
Description/subject: Executive Summary: "This report documents how women in the Palaung area are affected by domestic violence and gender discrimination. Survey results collected by PWO show that almost all respondents had experienced or seen physical violence within families in their community, and that physical violence is occurring with alarming frequency, in many cases on an almost daily basis. PWO’s research shows that gender discrimination is widespread in the Palaung area, and that many people’s attitudes conform to traditional gender stereotypes which assume that women must fulfil the role of homemaker and accept sole responsibility for childcare duties. Since the 2010 election, Burma’s military-backed regime has failed to take any effective action to promote women’s rights and gender equality, or to uphold its commitments to CEDAW. Burma remains one of only two ASEAN countries lacking a specific law criminalising domestic violence, and PWO’s research has found that there are no government-led projects to raise awareness of domestic violence and women’s rights in the rural areas of northern Shan State, where the vast majority of the Palaung population live. The ‘new’ regime has yet to address the economic and social crises fuelling domestic violence in the Palaung area. The economic crisis afflicting the Palaung people as a direct result of the state’s monopoly of the tea industry, as well as the increase in opium cultivation and addiction in the Palaung area since the 2010 election have directly contributed to the problem of domestic violence, as males resort to physical violence as a means of expressing their anger and frustration with their situation. More than five decades of civil war have bred a culture of male domination, fear, and violence in Burma. Palaung people, especially males, have been socialised into this culture, and see violence as a necessary means of asserting their authority over their wives, in the same way as the state uses violence to assert its authority over Burma’s ethnic nationalities. The regime appears to have no intention of bringing an end to Burma’s culture of violence, and continues to wage war against ethnic rebels in northern Shan State. 5 Domestic violence has a devastating impact on individuals, families and communities. Apart from the obvious physical impact of domestic violence, women also suffer psychologically. Domestic violence threatens the stability of the family unit, often has a negative impact on children’s education, and acts as an obstacle to community development. Burma’s military-backed regime needs to recognise domestic violence and gender discrimination as obstacles to achieving a peaceful society in Burma, and to embark upon a program of genuine political reform which addresses the social and economic factors fuelling domestic violence and gender discrimination."
Language: Burmese
Source/publisher: Palaung Women's Organization (PWO)
Format/size: pdf (1.91MB)
Alternate URLs: http://www.palaungwomen.com
Date of entry/update: 25 January 2012


Title: Voices for Change: Domestic Violence and Gender Discrimination in the Palaung Area (English)
Date of publication: 25 November 2011
Description/subject: Executive Summary: "This report documents how women in the Palaung area are affected by domestic violence and gender discrimination. Survey results collected by PWO show that almost all respondents had experienced or seen physical violence within families in their community, and that physical violence is occurring with alarming frequency, in many cases on an almost daily basis. PWO’s research shows that gender discrimination is widespread in the Palaung area, and that many people’s attitudes conform to traditional gender stereotypes which assume that women must fulfi l the role of homemaker and accept sole responsibility for childcare duties. Since the 2010 election, Burma’s military-backed regime has failed to take any effective action to promote women’s rights and gender equality, or to uphold its commitments to CEDAW. Burma remains one of only two ASEAN countries lacking a specifi c law criminalising domestic violence, and PWO’s’ research has found that there are no government-led projects to raise awareness of domestic violence and women’s rights in the rural areas of northern Shan State, where the vast majority of the Palaung population live. The ‘new’ regime has yet to address the economic and social crises fuelling domestic violence in the Palaung area. The economic crisis affl icting the Palaung people as a direct result of the state’s monopoly of the tea industry, as well as the increase in opium cultivation and addiction in the Palaung area since the 2010 election have directly contributed to the problem of domestic violence, as males resort to physical violence as a means of expressing their anger and frustration with their situation. More than fi ve decades of civil war have bred a culture of male domination, fear, and violence in Burma. Palaung people, especially males, have been socialised into this culture, and see violence as a necessary means of asserting their authority over their wives, in the same way as the state uses violence to assert its authority over Burma’s ethnic nationalities. The regime appears to have no intention of bringing an end to Burma’s culture of violence, and continues to wage war against ethnic rebels in northern Shan State. 5 Domestic violence has a devastating impact on individuals, families and communities. Apart from the obvious physical impact of domestic violence, women also suffer psychologically. Domestic violence threatens the stability of the family unit, often has a negative impact on children’s education, and acts as an obstacle to community development. Burma’s military-backed regime needs to recognise domestic violence and gender discrimination as obstacles to achieving a peaceful society in Burma, and to embark upon a program of genuine political reform which addresses the social and economic factors fuelling domestic violence and gender discrimination."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Palaung Women's Organisation
Format/size: pdf (1.5MB)
Alternate URLs: http://www.palaungwomen.com
Date of entry/update: 25 January 2012


Title: Grabbing Land: Destructive Development in Ta'ang Region (Burmese)
Date of publication: November 2011
Description/subject: "This report validates the fact that multi-national and transnational companies are violating the Ta'ang ethnic nationals' fundamental human rights. The confiscation of Ta'ang peoples' land and the exploitation of their natural resources in which they depend for their subsistence and livelihood are outlined in this report. The Myanmar government continues to permit the persistence of business practices which are illegal under national and international laws. Massive displacements take place without the provisions of adequate compensation or relocation, let alone meaningful community consultations that left the affected people with no legal remedy to rebuild their lives and resume their collective activity. The situation of Ta'ang people in the Shan State is a classic example of land confiscation under the pretext of economic development while totally excluding the affected communities on the benefits of 'development' from foreign investment in the country. As a consequence of these activities the Ta'ang people have to bear the brunt of not only losing their land and source of livelihood, but as well as the practice of forced labor by the SPDC against the Ta'ang people. This forced labor facilitates private companies' projects at the expense of the already displaced community. In this situation, the women, children and the elderly are also disproportionately affected. This report lays testament to the sufferings of the Ta'ang people. This wanton violation of Ta'ang ethnic nationals' rights is representative of the emblematic and widespread disregard for the fundamental rights in Myanmar. It is an outright violation of a number of international laws which include the United Nations Convention on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (1966), the violation of the International Labor Organisation (1930, No. 29, Article 2.1). It is also a breach on their commitment as UN member state to the UN Declaration on the Right to Development adopted in 1986 and the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights (2011). Yet, international and regional intergovernmental body such as the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) is playing deaf and blind in addressing the situation to put an end to these illegal practices. It is hoped that this report could facilitate the necessary steps and concrete action in behalf of the Ta'ang ethnic nationals which are required from the relevant UN agencies, international and regional bodies, international financial institutions, and the bilateral and multi-lateral donor agencies. The stories collected in this report speak for the longstanding issues that beset the Ta'ang S ethnic nationals and the efforts of the Ta'ang Students and Youth Organisation in publishing this report is a very important step in trying to make a significant contribution to change that situation, now and for the generations to come. As this report shows, this situation could not continue as if it is business as usual. There is no way forward but for a multi-level dialogue to take place and agree on an amicable settlement which is in line with the national and international laws. Let this report which underlines concrete recommendations, encourages all concerned international and national stakeholders and the Ta'ang community to come together and agree to implement resolutions in ways that preserve the Ta'ang ethnic nationals' human rights while meeting the challenges of a sustainable economic development in Myanmar."
Source/publisher: Ta’ang (Palaung) Working Group - TSYO, PWO, PSLF
Format/size: pdf (7.7MB)
Date of entry/update: 25 January 2012


Title: Grabbing Land: Destructive Development in Ta'ang Region (English)
Date of publication: November 2011
Description/subject: "This report validates the fact that multi-national and transnational companies are violating the Ta'ang ethnic nationals' fundamental human rights. The confiscation of Ta'ang peoples' land and the exploitation of their natural resources in which they depend for their subsistence and livelihood are outlined in this report. The Myanmar government continues to permit the persistence of business practices which are illegal under national and international laws. Massive displacements take place without the provisions of adequate compensation or relocation, let alone meaningful community consultations that left the affected people with no legal remedy to rebuild their lives and resume their collective activity. The situation of Ta'ang people in the Shan State is a classic example of land confiscation under the pretext of economic development while totally excluding the affected communities on the benefits of 'development' from foreign investment in the country. As a consequence of these activities the Ta'ang people have to bear the brunt of not only losing their land and source of livelihood, but as well as the practice of forced labor by the SPDC against the Ta'ang people. This forced labor facilitates private companies' projects at the expense of the already displaced community. In this situation, the women, children and the elderly are also disproportionately affected. This report lays testament to the sufferings of the Ta'ang people. This wanton violation of Ta'ang ethnic nationals' rights is representative of the emblematic and widespread disregard for the fundamental rights in Myanmar. It is an outright violation of a number of international laws which include the United Nations Convention on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (1966), the violation of the International Labor Organisation (1930, No. 29, Article 2.1). It is also a breach on their commitment as UN member state to the UN Declaration on the Right to Development adopted in 1986 and the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights (2011). Yet, international and regional intergovernmental body such as the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) is playing deaf and blind in addressing the situation to put an end to these illegal practices. It is hoped that this report could facilitate the necessary steps and concrete action in behalf of the Ta'ang ethnic nationals which are required from the relevant UN agencies, international and regional bodies, international financial institutions, and the bilateral and multi-lateral donor agencies. The stories collected in this report speak for the longstanding issues that beset the Ta'ang S ethnic nationals and the efforts of the Ta'ang Students and Youth Organisation in publishing this report is a very important step in trying to make a significant contribution to change that situation, now and for the generations to come. As this report shows, this situation could not continue as if it is business as usual. There is no way forward but for a multi-level dialogue to take place and agree on an amicable settlement which is in line with the national and international laws. Let this report which underlines concrete recommendations, encourages all concerned international and national stakeholders and the Ta'ang community to come together and agree to implement resolutions in ways that preserve the Ta'ang ethnic nationals' human rights while meeting the challenges of a sustainable economic development in Myanmar."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Ta'ang Student and Youth Organization-TSYO
Format/size: pdf (803K)
Alternate URLs: http://www.palaungland.org
Date of entry/update: 25 January 2012


Title: Shweli Under Siege - Dams proceed amid war in Burma (Burmese)
Date of publication: November 2011
Description/subject: Summary: "Despite its recent suspension of the Irrawaddy Myitsone dam, Burma’s regime, together with Chinese and Swiss companies, is planning to build two mega dams on the Shweli, a tributary of Burma’s great Irrawaddy River. The Shweli is a critical river for the economy and culture of Shan State, particularly for the Ta’ang (Palaung) people. • Nearly 15,000 people will be impacted by the planned Shweli dams. Over 3,000 people have been ordered to move out by 2013 without any guaranteed compensation. • Over 700 acres of local farmlands and community forest areas have already been seized during the construction of new roads and establishment of military camps near the dam sites. Burma Army soldiers deployed to the dam sites have put local fi shing grounds off limits, and forced women to restrict their movement. Rampant and unregulated logging by Burmese and Chinese companies has destroyed large sections of forests near the dam sites. • Battles between the Kachin Independence Army and Burma’s military troops broke out in a village between Shweli Dam 1 and Dam 2 in June 2011, forcing Chinese workers to fl ee. To date no one has returned, clashes continue in the area, and access to the Dam 2 site is prohibited without military permission. • Construction of the fi rst dam on the Shweli, completed in late 2008, led to increased militarization, forced labor and land confi scation. The vast majority of electricity generated at Shweli Dam 1 is exported to China. • A completed dam and two planned dams on the Shweli River are already having a series of negative impacts while providing little benefi t to local peoples. There is almost no public information about the dams, affected peoples have not been consulted, and no impact assessments have been disclosed. Therefore any further plans to dam the Shweli must be stopped."
Language: Burmese, English, Thai
Source/publisher: Ta’ang Students and Youth Organization (TSYO)
Format/size: pdf (4.7MB)
Date of entry/update: 28 January 2012


Title: Shweli Under Siege - Dams proceed amid war in Burma (English)
Date of publication: November 2011
Description/subject: Summary: "Despite its recent suspension of the Irrawaddy Myitsone dam, Burma’s regime, together with Chinese and Swiss companies, is planning to build two mega dams on the Shweli, a tributary of Burma’s great Irrawaddy River. The Shweli is a critical river for the economy and culture of Shan State, particularly for the Ta’ang (Palaung) people. • Nearly 15,000 people will be impacted by the planned Shweli dams. Over 3,000 people have been ordered to move out by 2013 without any guaranteed compensation. • Over 700 acres of local farmlands and community forest areas have already been seized during the construction of new roads and establishment of military camps near the dam sites. Burma Army soldiers deployed to the dam sites have put local fi shing grounds off limits, and forced women to restrict their movement. Rampant and unregulated logging by Burmese and Chinese companies has destroyed large sections of forests near the dam sites. • Battles between the Kachin Independence Army and Burma’s military troops broke out in a village between Shweli Dam 1 and Dam 2 in June 2011, forcing Chinese workers to fl ee. To date no one has returned, clashes continue in the area, and access to the Dam 2 site is prohibited without military permission. • Construction of the fi rst dam on the Shweli, completed in late 2008, led to increased militarization, forced labor and land confi scation. The vast majority of electricity generated at Shweli Dam 1 is exported to China. • A completed dam and two planned dams on the Shweli River are already having a series of negative impacts while providing little benefi t to local peoples. There is almost no public information about the dams, affected peoples have not been consulted, and no impact assessments have been disclosed. Therefore any further plans to dam the Shweli must be stopped."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Ta’ang Students and Youth Organization (TSYO)
Format/size: pdf (4.7MB)
Date of entry/update: 28 January 2012


Title: Still Poisoned - Opium cultivation soars in Palaung areas under Burma’s new regime (English, Burmese press release)
Date of publication: October 2011
Description/subject: Summary: "Almost one year after Burma’s long-awaited elections were held in November 2010, Palaung communities in northern Shan State are suffering from the effects of an even greater upsurge in opium cultivation than in previous years. Local paramilitary leaders, some now elected into Burma’s new parliament, are being allowed to cultivate and profi t from drugs in return for helping the regime suppress ethnic resistance forces in Burma’s escalating civil war. As a result, drug addiction has escalated in the Palaung area, tearing apart families and communities. Burma’s drug problems are set to worsen unless there is genuine political reform that addresses the political aspirations of Burma’s ethnic minority groups. Research carried out by Palaung Women’s Organisation in Namkham Township shows that: 􀂃 Opium cultivation across 15 villages in Namkham Township has increased by a staggering 78.58% within two years. 􀂃 12 villages in the same area, which had not previously grown opium, have started to grow opium since 2009. 􀂃 A signifi cant number of these villages are under the control of government paramilitary “anti-insurgency” forces, which are directly profi ting from the opium trade. 􀂃 The most prominent militia leader and druglord in the area, “Pansay” Kyaw Myint, from the military-backed Union Solidarity and Development Party, was elected as an MP for Namkham in November 2010; he promised voters that they could grow opium freely for 5 years if they voted for him. 􀂃 Government troops, police and militia continue to openly tax opium farmers, and to collect bribes from drug addicts in exchange for their release from custody. 􀂃 Drug addiction in Palaung communities has spiralled out of control. In one Palaung village, PWO found that 91% of males aged 15 and over were addicted to drugs. Drug addiction is causing huge problems for families, with women and children bearing the burden of increased poverty, crime and violence."
Language: English, Burmese
Source/publisher: Palaung Women's Organization (PWO)
Format/size: pdf (417K; Burmese press release 68K; English press release 85K))
Alternate URLs: http://www.palaungwomen.com
http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs12/Still_Poisoned-PR(bu).pdf
http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs12/Still_Poisoned-Press_Release(en).pdf
Date of entry/update: 25 October 2011


Title: Monopoly Tea Farms (Burmese)
Date of publication: 05 June 2011
Description/subject: "The Ta’ang (Palaung) people are traditionally tea cultivators, however, they currently face economic hardship due to a decline in the tea market in 2011. Although the tea price was good and many tea traders bought tea during the Shwe Pyi Oo (first harvest), one week later the price of tea fell and just a few traders were buying tea. After that the tea market was very weak and tea production almost came to a halt. The Shwe Pyi Oo tea season occurs over one month from the end of March to the end of April, and is an important time for the livelihoods of the Ta’ang people. The majority of Ta’ang people who produce tea live in Namhsam, Mantong, Namtu, Namkham, Kutkai, western Kyaukmae and Thipaw in Northern Shan State. Tea production is the main source of income for over (600,000) six hundred thousand Ta’ang people. Because the main source of income of the Ta’ang people is in crisis and the monopoly of the regime, the local population is facing many related economic, social, educational and health problems. The new Burma’s military regime and other organizations have not addressed the crisis that the Ta’ang people are facing as a result of the decline of the tea industry. Therefore, the Ta’ang (Palaung) working group has produced this briefing paper about the problems that Ta’ang tea cultivators are facing. Our objective is to inform people and to help solve the problems that Ta’ang tea cultivators are facing in the Palaung area..."
Language: Burmese
Source/publisher: Ta’ang (Palaung) Working Group - TSYO, PWO, PSLF
Format/size: pdf (396K-OBL version; 547K-original)
Alternate URLs: http://www.palaungland.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/Tea%20Briefing%20Paper%20by%20%20Burmese%20Ve...
Date of entry/update: 25 January 2012


Title: Monopoly Tea Farms (English)
Date of publication: 05 June 2011
Description/subject: The Ta’ang (Palaung) people are traditionally tea cultivators, however, they currently face economic hardship due to a decline in the tea market in 2011. Although the tea price was good and many tea traders bought tea during the Shwe Pyi Oo (first harvest), one week later the price of tea fell and just a few traders were buying tea. After that the tea market was very weak and tea production almost came to a halt. The Shwe Pyi Oo tea season occurs over one month from the end of March to the end of April, and is an important time for the livelihoods of the Ta’ang people. The majority of Ta’ang people who produce tea live in Namhsam, Mantong, Namtu, Namkham, Kutkai, western Kyaukmae and Thipaw in Northern Shan State. Tea production is the main source of income for over (600,000) six hundred thousand Ta’ang people. Because the main source of income of the Ta’ang people is in crisis and the monopoly of the regime, the local population is facing many related economic, social, educational and health problems. The new Burma’s military regime and other organizations have not addressed the crisis that the Ta’ang people are facing as a result of the decline of the tea industry. Therefore, the Ta’ang (Palaung) working group has produced this briefing paper about the problems that Ta’ang tea cultivators are facing. Our objective is to inform people and to help solve the problems that Ta’ang tea cultivators are facing in the Palaung area.
Language: English
Source/publisher: Ta’ang (Palaung) Working Group - TSYO, PWO, PSLF
Format/size: pdf (336K-OBL version; 503K-original))
Alternate URLs: http://www.palaungland.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/Tea%20Briefing%20Paper%20by%20%20English%20Ve...
Date of entry/update: 25 January 2012


Title: Poisoned Hills - Opium cultivation surges under government control in Burma (Burmese)
Date of publication: 26 January 2010
Description/subject: Executive Summary: Community assessments by the Palaung Women's Organisation during the past two years reveal that the amount of opium being cultivated in Burma's northern Shan State has been increasing dramatically. The amounts are far higher than reported in the annual opium surveys of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), and are flourishing not in "insurgent and ceasefire areas," as claimed by the UN, but in areas controlled by Burma's military government, the State Peace and Development Council (SPDC). Between 2007-2009, PWO conducted field surveys in Namkham and Mantong townships, and found that the total area of opium cultivated increased almost fivefold over three years from 964 hectares in the 2006-7 season to 4,545 hectares in the 2008-9 season. Namkham and Mantong are both fully under the control of the SPDC. The areas have an extensive security infrastructure including Burma Army battalions, police, and pro-government village militia. These militia are allowed to engage in illicit income-generating activities in exchange for policing against resistance activity, and are being expanded in the lead up to the regime's planned 2010 elections. Local authorities, in "anti-drug teams" formed by the police in each township, have been systematically extorting fees from villagers in exchange for allowing them to grow opium. During the 2007-8 season in Mantong township, at least 37 million kyat (US$37,000) in bribes in total were collected from 28 villages. PWO data shows that the "anti-drug teams" are leaving the majority of opium fields intact, and are filing false eradication data to the police headquarters. PWO found that only 11% of the poppy fields during the 2008-9 season had been destroyed, mostly only in easily visible places. The fact that authorities are profiting from drug production is enabling drug abuse to flourish. In one village surveyed in Mantong, it was found that that the percentage of men aged 15 and over addicted to opium increased from 57% in 2007 to 85% in 2009. Around the town of Namkham, heroin addicts flock openly to "drug camps," and dealers sell heroin and amphetamines from their houses. PWO's findings thus highlight the structural issues underlying the drug problem in Burma. The regime is pursuing a strategy of increased militarization in the ethnic states to crush ethnic resistance movements, instead of entering into political negotiations with them. For this, it needs an ever growing security apparatus, which in turn is subsidized by the drug trade. The regime's desire to maintain power at all costs is thus taking precedence over its stated aims of drug eradication. Unless the regime's militarization strategies are challenged, international funding will make little difference to the drug problem in Burma. A negotiated resolution of the political issues at the root of Burma's civil war is urgently needed to seriously address the drug scourge which is impacting the region..."
Language: Burmese
Source/publisher: Palaung Women's Organization
Format/size: pdf (3.9MB)
Alternate URLs: http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs08/Poisoned_Hills-PWO.pdf (English)
Date of entry/update: 29 January 2010


Title: Poisoned Hills - Opium cultivation surges under government control in Burma (English)
Date of publication: 26 January 2010
Description/subject: Executive Summary: Community assessments by the Palaung Women's Organisation during the past two years reveal that the amount of opium being cultivated in Burma's northern Shan State has been increasing dramatically. The amounts are far higher than reported in the annual opium surveys of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), and are flourishing not in "insurgent and ceasefire areas," as claimed by the UN, but in areas controlled by Burma's military government, the State Peace and Development Council (SPDC). Between 2007-2009, PWO conducted field surveys in Namkham and Mantong townships, and found that the total area of opium cultivated increased almost fivefold over three years from 964 hectares in the 2006-7 season to 4,545 hectares in the 2008-9 season. Namkham and Mantong are both fully under the control of the SPDC. The areas have an extensive security infrastructure including Burma Army battalions, police, and pro-government village militia. These militia are allowed to engage in illicit income-generating activities in exchange for policing against resistance activity, and are being expanded in the lead up to the regime's planned 2010 elections. Local authorities, in "anti-drug teams" formed by the police in each township, have been systematically extorting fees from villagers in exchange for allowing them to grow opium. During the 2007-8 season in Mantong township, at least 37 million kyat (US$37,000) in bribes in total were collected from 28 villages. PWO data shows that the "anti-drug teams" are leaving the majority of opium fields intact, and are filing false eradication data to the police headquarters. PWO found that only 11% of the poppy fields during the 2008-9 season had been destroyed, mostly only in easily visible places. The fact that authorities are profiting from drug production is enabling drug abuse to flourish. In one village surveyed in Mantong, it was found that that the percentage of men aged 15 and over addicted to opium increased from 57% in 2007 to 85% in 2009. Around the town of Namkham, heroin addicts flock openly to "drug camps," and dealers sell heroin and amphetamines from their houses. PWO's findings thus highlight the structural issues underlying the drug problem in Burma. The regime is pursuing a strategy of increased militarization in the ethnic states to crush ethnic resistance movements, instead of entering into political negotiations with them. For this, it needs an ever growing security apparatus, which in turn is subsidized by the drug trade. The regime's desire to maintain power at all costs is thus taking precedence over its stated aims of drug eradication. Unless the regime's militarization strategies are challenged, international funding will make little difference to the drug problem in Burma. A negotiated resolution of the political issues at the root of Burma's civil war is urgently needed to seriously address the drug scourge which is impacting the region..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Palaung Women's Organization
Format/size: pdf (3.38MB)
Alternate URLs: http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs08/Poisoned_Hills-PWO-bu-red.pdf (Burmese)
Date of entry/update: 26 January 2010


Title: Under The Boot - The Burma Army clears the way for Chinese dams on the Shweli River (Burmese)
Date of publication: 2007
Description/subject: "This is the story of Man Tat village, a hamlet of 700 ethnically Palaung tea and rice farmers, fishers, hunters, mothers, and children. The village is located 90 kilometers from the Chinese town of Ruili, inside northern Burma. In late 2000, 300 armed soldiers from Burma's army converged on the village and set up a permanent base there. Unbeknownst to the villagers, Burma's military junta was planning to build a hydropower dam on their sacred Shweli River together with Chinese companies. Nothing has been the same since..."
Language: Burmese
Source/publisher: Palaung (Ta'ang) Youth Network Group (PYNG)
Format/size: pdf (2.3MBreduced version; 4.35-original )
Alternate URLs: http://www.palaungland.org/wp-content/uploads/shweli%20report%20ready%20in%20chinese/UndertheBootBu...
Date of entry/update: 28 January 2012


Title: Under The Boot - The Burma Army clears the way for Chinese dams on the Shweli River (Chinese)
Date of publication: 2007
Description/subject: "This is the story of Man Tat village, a hamlet of 700 ethnically Palaung tea and rice farmers, fishers, hunters, mothers, and children. The village is located 90 kilometers from the Chinese town of Ruili, inside northern Burma. In late 2000, 300 armed soldiers from Burma's army converged on the village and set up a permanent base there. Unbeknownst to the villagers, Burma's military junta was planning to build a hydropower dam on their sacred Shweli River together with Chinese companies. Nothing has been the same since..."
Language: Chinese
Source/publisher: Palaung (Ta'ang) Youth Network Group (PYNG)
Format/size: pdf (2.4MB-reduced version; 3.51MB-original)
Alternate URLs: http://www.palaungland.org/wp-content/uploads/shweli%20report%20ready%20in%20chinese/UndertheBootCh...
Date of entry/update: 28 January 2012


Title: Under The Boot - The Burma Army clears the way for Chinese dams on the Shweli River (English)
Date of publication: 2007
Description/subject: "This is the story of Man Tat village, a hamlet of 700 ethnically Palaung tea and rice farmers, fishers, hunters, mothers, and children. The village is located 90 kilometers from the Chinese town of Ruili, inside northern Burma. In late 2000, 300 armed soldiers from Burma's army converged on the village and set up a permanent base there. Unbeknownst to the villagers, Burma's military junta was planning to build a hydropower dam on their sacred Shweli River together with Chinese companies. Nothing has been the same since..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Palaung (Ta'ang) Youth Network Group (PYNG)
Format/size: pdf (2.8MB-reduced version; 4.71-original)
Alternate URLs: http://www.palaungland.org/wp-content/uploads/2008/UndertheBootEnglish.pdf
Date of entry/update: 28 January 2012


Title: Poisoned Flowers: The Impacts of Spiraling Drug Addiction on Palaung Women in Burma,
Date of publication: 09 June 2006
Description/subject: "'Poisoned Flowers: The Impacts of Spiraling Drug Addiction on Palaung Women in Burma', based on interviews with eighty-eight wives and mothers of drug addicts, shows how women in Palaung areas have become increasingly vulnerable due to the rising addiction rates. Already living in dire poverty, with little access to education or health care, wives of addicts must struggle single-handedly to support as many as ten children. Addicted husbands not only stop providing for their families, but also sell off property and possessions, commit theft, and subject their wives and children to repeated verbal and physical abuse. The report details cases of women losing eight out of eleven children to disease and of daughters being trafficked by their addicted father. The increased addiction rates have resulted from the regime allowing drug lords to expand production into Palaung areas in recent years, in exchange for policing against resistance activity and sharing drug profits. The collapse of markets for tea and other crops has driven more and more farmers to turn to opium growing or to work as labourers in opium fields, where wages are frequently paid in opium. The report throws into question claims by the regime and the UNODC of a dramatic reduction of opium production in Burma during the past decade, and calls on donor countries and UN agencies supporting drug eradication programs in Burma to push for genuine political reform..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Palaung Women's Organization
Format/size: pdf (632K), Word (360K)
Alternate URLs: http://www.womenofburma.org/Report/PoisonedFlowers.pdf
http://www.womenofburma.org/Report/PoisonedFlowers.doc
Date of entry/update: 08 June 2006


Title: Lway Chee Sangar: Reclaiming Rights After a Childhood of Labor, Hardship, and Conflict
Description/subject: "“We had never heard about human rights in the village,” Lway Chee Sangar tells me at the Palaung Women’s Organization (PWO) office in Mae Sot, Thailand. Sangar is 23 years old. The ethnic nationality group to which she belongs, called the Palaung or Ta’ang, has been caught in an armed struggle for self-determination against the brutal Burmese regime for the better part of the past five decades. Sangar began working with the PWO about three years ago when her parents, desperate to give her an opportunity to improve her life, sent her from their tiny, remote village in the northern Shan State of Burma to the PWO’s former training center in China. It took her a combined six months of training at the PWO to begin to grasp the idea that all humans have rights. Sangar’s story is speckled with brushes with conflict, starting from her birth. She was born on the run, when her parents had to flee their village due to an outbreak of fighting nearby. Today, the Ta’ang National Liberation Army (TNLA), the armed wing of the Palaung State Liberation Front, is fighting off Burmese offensives and combatting opium cultivation in Palaung areas, according to their statement. Civilians are often caught in the cross-fire. Burmese forces have been known to use brutal tactics against civilians in conflict areas, including deadly forced portering and forced labor, torture, killing, and extortion of money, supplies, and drugs."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Burma Link
Format/size: pdf
Date of entry/update: 18 March 2016


Title: PWO Part One: ‘It’s the women and children that are suffering’
Description/subject: "The northern Shan state, home to a majority of the Ta’ang people (referred to as ‘Palaung’ by others), is among the least accessible areas in Burma. These areas host some of the bloodiest conflict, the most poppy cultivation, extremely high rates of opium addiction, and crippling poverty. The Palaung Women’s Organization (PWO) has developed an impressive range of programs to empower Palaung women and support and advocate for their communities in the war-torn, drug-ravaged areas in northern Burma–all while combatting gender-discrimination and an epidemic of domestic violence. Three Palaung women, De De, Lway Yu Ni, and Lway Chee Sangar, each from a different Palaung village, sat down with us to speak about their lives, their struggles, and the work of the PWO."...See the Alternate link for part 2.
Language: English
Source/publisher: Burma Link
Format/size: pdf
Alternate URLs: http://www.burmalink.org/pwo-part-two-empowering-women-whilst-facing-conflict-poverty-opiate-epidem...
Date of entry/update: 18 March 2016


Title: Ta’ang (Palaung) Leader’s Message to the International Community: ‘Come and See the Real Picture in Our Areas’
Description/subject: "The Ta’ang, also known as Palaung, are one of Burma’s myriad ethnic groups who have been fighting for basic human rights and autonomy for decades. Despite the international enthusiasm over Burma’s reform process, the reality in Burma’s ethnic borderlands remains dire, and the Burmese military continues its brutal offensive against ethnic civilians. Tar Aik Bong joined the Ta’ang struggle in 1987, and is now the Chairperson of the Palaung State Liberation Front (PSLF), the Head of military commission of the Ta’ang National Liberation Army (TNLA), as well as a member of the United Nationalities Federal Council (UNFC) council and Foreign Affairs Department. The PSLF/TNLA is one of the few prominent ethnic armed groups yet to sign a ceasefire with the Burmese government. The following is Tar Aik Bong’s message to the international community."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Burma Link
Format/size: pdf
Date of entry/update: 18 March 2016