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Home > Main Library > Health > Health systems and resources > History of health care in Burma

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History of health care in Burma

Individual Documents

Title: VACCINATION PROPAGANDA: THE POLITICS OF COMMUNICATING COLONIAL MEDICINE IN NINETEENTH CENTURY BURMA
Date of publication: March 2006
Description/subject: "...In examining the British government’s frequently half-hearted and sometimes even contradictory attempts to convince the indigenous population to accept vaccination, Burma does begin to appear in some ways as a neglected corner of British India. However, Burma may not really have been an exception as other literature has found similar problems in British India in general..."
Author/creator: Atsuko Naono
Language: English
Source/publisher: SOAS Bulletin of Burma Research 4.1 (Spring 2006)
Format/size: pdf (225K - reduced version; 458K- original)
Alternate URLs: http://web.archive.org/web/20070612023842/http://web.soas.ac.uk/burma/4.1files/4.1naono.pdf
Date of entry/update: 09 November 2008


Title: The efficacy and tolerability of rifampicin in Burmese patients with lepromatous leprosy
Date of publication: March 1978
Description/subject: SUMMARY — Seventy-one Burmese adult patients with lepromatous leprosy were treated with various regimens of rifampicin monotherapy, 450 mg. daily for 60 days or 900 mg. once weekly for 12 weeks or 450 mg. daily for six months. Of the patients, 18 had relapsed after stopping DDS therapy, 20 were intolerant of DDS, 18 were DDS resistant and 15 had received no previous treatment. Rifampicin produced a 75% reduction in the size of skin nodules in two thirds of the patients and a complete disappearance of nodules in the others. After one month drug treatment the MI fell to zero but the BI remained unchanged. The once weekly regimen was as effective as the daily treatment. Four patients had to be withdrawn due to ENL reactions. NOTE:The contents of this paper were presented at the Burma Medical Conference, 1977.
Author/creator: TIN SHWE, KYAW LWIN, KYO THWE
Language: English
Source/publisher: Hansen. Int
Format/size: pdf (298.66 K)
Date of entry/update: 02 November 2010