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Individual videos and films on Burma in English and other non-Asian languages

Websites/Multiple Documents

Title: The Burma Railway (video)
Description/subject: Archive footage on the construction of the Bridge over the River Kwai... in 6 parts..."The Burma Railway is a 415 km line between Bangkok, Thailand and Rangoon, Burma (now Myanmar), built by the Empire of Japan during World War II, to support its forces in the Burma campaign. Forced labour was used in its construction. About 180,000 Asian labourers and 60,000 Allied prisoners of war (POWs) worked on the railway. Of these, around 90,000 Asian labourers and 16,000 Allied POWs died as a direct result of the project. The dead POWs included 6,318 British personnel, 2,815 Australians, 2,490 Dutch, about 356 Americans and a smaller number of Canadians. A railway route between Thailand and Burma had been surveyed at the beginning of the 20th century, by the British government of Burma, but the proposed course of the line — through hilly jungle terrain divided by many rivers — was considered too difficult to complete. In 1942, Japanese forces invaded Burma from Thailand and seized it from British control. To maintain their forces in Burma, the Japanese had to bring supplies and troops to Burma by sea, through the Strait of Malacca and the Andaman Sea. This route was vulnerable to attack by Allied submarines, and a different means of transport was needed. The obvious alternative was a railway. The Japanese started the project in June 1942. They intended to connect Ban Pong with Thanbyuzayat, through the Three Pagodas Pass. Construction started at the Thai end on 22 June 1942 and in Burma at roughly the same time. Most of the construction materials for the line, including tracks and sleepers, were brought from dismantled branches of the Federated Malay States Railway network and from the Netherlands East Indies. On 17 October 1943, the two sections of the line met about 18 km (11 miles) south of the Three Pagodas Pass at Konkuita (Kaeng Khoi Tha, Sangkhla Buri district, Kanchanaburi Province). Most of the POWs were then transferred to Japan. Those left to maintain the line still suffered from the appalling living conditions as well as Allied air raids. The most famous portion of the railway is probably Bridge 277 over the Khwae Yai River (Thai แควใหญ่, English "big tributary"). (The river was originally known as the Mae Klong and was renamed Khwae Yai in 1960.) It was immortalized by Pierre Boulle in his book and the film based on it: The Bridge on the River Kwai. However, there are many who say that the movie is utterly unrealistic and does not show what the conditions and treatment of prisoners was really like.[2] The first wooden bridge over the Khwae Yai was finished in February 1943, followed by a concrete and steel bridge in June 1943. According to Hellfire Tours in Thailand, "The two bridges were successfully bombed on 13 February 1945 by the Royal Air Force. Repairs were carried out by POW labor and by April the wooden trestle bridge was back in operation. On 3 April a second raid by Liberator bombers of the U.S. Army Air Forces damaged the wooden bridge once again. Repair work continued and both bridges were operational again by the end of May. A second raid by the R.A.F. on 24 June put the railway out of commission for the rest of the war. After the Japanese surrender the British Army removed 3.9 Kilometers of track on the Thai-Burma border. A survey of the track had shown that its poor construction would not support commercial traffic. The track was sold to Thai Railways and the 130-km Ban Pong--Namtok section relaid and is in use today.
Language: English
Source/publisher: Documentary Channel via Youtube
Format/size: Adobe Flash
Date of entry/update: 17 February 2012


Individual Documents

Title: Myanmar election: Suu Kyi to meet with President (text and video)
Date of publication: 11 November 2015
Description/subject: "Myanmar's President Thein Sein has agreed to meet with Aung San Suu Kyi as early election results point toward victory for Suu Kyi's National League of Democracy. The President's office didn't spell out when such a meeting would take place, but it congratulated Suu Kyi and the NLD on their success. "We will wait until the ... counting of the ballots eases up and try to arrange a time to meet when it is a bit quieter," said Zaw Htay, director of the President's office. The NLD has won 256 of the 299 seats declared so far in the country's parliament, the Pyidaungsu Hluttaw. Suu Kyi won a seat in the Kawhmu constituency in Yangon, the city formerly known as Rangoon, the Union Election Commission said Wednesday..."..... Several other reports with the videos about 2015 Myanmar election.
Author/creator: Ed Payne
Language: English
Source/publisher: CNN
Format/size: Core Video Player (1.11minutes)
Date of entry/update: 12 November 2015


Title: Myanmar's Aung San Suu Kyi: NLD has won election majority (video)
Date of publication: 10 November 2015
Description/subject: "Early results point to a sweeping victory for her National League for Democracy (NLD), but final official results will not be known for days. The election was seen as the most democratic in Myanmar for 25 years. In an interview with the BBC's Fergal Keane, Ms Suu Kyi said the polls were not fair but "largely free". She said there had been "areas of intimidation". A quarter of Myanmar's 664 parliamentary seats are set aside for the army, and for the NLD to have the winning majority it will need at least two-thirds of the contested seats. But Ms Suu Kyi told the BBC that her party has surpassed that, and has won around 75%. The military-backed Union Solidarity Development Party (USDP) has been in power in Myanmar since 2011 when the country began its transition from decades of military rule to a civilian government..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: BBC
Format/size: SMPFlash (1.26minutes)
Date of entry/update: 11 November 2015


Title: Myanmar: Free and Fair? (video)
Date of publication: 05 November 2015
Description/subject: "Ahead of Myanmar's historic election, we meet activists refusing to buckle under a campaign of harassment and arrest...Standing by her husband's grave, Ma Thanda is looking for answers. It has been one year since her spouse, a journalist and activist, disappeared while in military custody. Meanwhile, Po Po, a student protest organiser, is still reeling from one of Myanmar's bloodiest crackdowns in years. After attacking her fellow demonstrators in March, police filed dubious charges that could land her in prison for nine years. Myanmar is set to hold what is could be the country's first legitimate election in half a decade. But government hardliners are waging their own hidden campaign to silence dissidents. And the law is on their side. 101 East meets activists being harassed, arrested and imprisoned in plain sight, setting back Myanmar's march toward democratic freedom..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Al Jazeera (101 East)
Format/size: Adobe Flash (25 minutes)
Date of entry/update: 12 November 2015


Title: Al Jazeera Investigates - Genocide Agenda (video)
Date of publication: 26 October 2015
Description/subject: 'Documents obtained by Al Jazeera’s Investigative Unit expose the inner workings of the Myanmar government, providing “strong evidence” of genocide against the Rohingya minority'... 'Strong evidence' of genocide in Myanmar, finds Al Jazeera investigation... Exclusive evidence obtained by Al Jazeera’s Investigative Unit reveals government has been triggering communal violence..."
Language: English (some in Burmese or Rohingya with English sub-titles)
Source/publisher: Al Jazeera with Fortify Rights
Format/size: html, Adobe Flash
Alternate URLs: http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/features/2015/10/genocide-agenda-documents-presented-evidence-1510...
http://www.aljazeera.com/investigations/default.html
Date of entry/update: 26 October 2015


Title: ORGANISED CHAOS - The illicit overland timber trade between Myanmar and China (plus video)
Date of publication: 17 September 2015
Description/subject: STATE OF MYANMAR’S FORESTS... BRIEF HISTORY OF THE MYANMAR-CHINA... OVERLAND TIMBER TRADE... EIA INVESTIGATIONS... CHINA’S ROLE....."For at least two decades, timber extracted from Myanmar’s precious frontier forests in highly destructive logging operations has been flowing into China unhindered. It is an illicit business worth hundreds of millions of dollars a year, making it one of the single largest bilateral flows of illegal timber in the world. From the outside looking in, the cross-border trade appears chaotic and complex. Most of the timber entering Yunnan is either cut or transported through Kachin State, a zone of conflict between ethnic political groups and the Myanmar Government and its military. Here, all sides to varying degrees profit from the logging and timber trade, from the award of rights to Chinese businesses to log whole mountains, often paid in gold bars, to levying fees at multiple checkpoints to allow trucks carrying logs to pass. While Kachin and Yunnan lie at the heart of trade, it reaches far wider. Logs shipped across the border are increasingly sourced from further inside Myanmar, such as Sagaing Division, and end up supplying factories in south and east China. Yet field research conducted by the Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA) reveals that beneath the apparent chaos lies an intricate and structured supply chain within which different players have a defined function and collude to ensure the logs keep flowing. Key nodes in the chain involve well-connected intermediaries who secure logging rights for resale, cooperative groups of business people who monopolise the trade at certain crossing points, and logistics companies on the China side of the border which effectively legalise the timber by clearing it through customs and paying tax. The peak year for the illicit trade was 2005, when one million cubic metres (m3) of logs crossed the border. A brief hiatus occurred for a few years afterwards when Chinese authorities clamped down on the trade. But it proved to be short-lived and the scale of the business is once again approaching the peak levels. This trade is illegal under Myanmar law, which mandates that all wood should exit the country via Yangon port, and contravenes the country’s log export ban. It also goes against the stated policy of the Chinese Government to respect the forestry laws of other countries and oppose illegal logging. It is time for both countries to take urgent effective action against the massive illicit timber trade across their joint border. The 155 Chinese loggers have now returned home, but without action to end the trade others will take their place and further conflict, violence and forest destruction will occur..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA)
Format/size: html, pdf (1.24K); Adobe Flash - 7 minutes
Alternate URLs: https://eia-international.org/cash-from-chaos-the-illicit-trade-in-timber-from-myanmar-to-china
http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs21/EIA-2015-09-Organised_Chaos.pdf
Date of entry/update: 18 September 2015


Title: [Interview with Bertil Lintner] ‘They Don’t Just Want a Ceasefire, They Want to Talk About the Future of the Country’ (text + video)
Date of publication: 03 September 2015
Description/subject: "The next round of talks on the nationwide ceasefire agreement have been set for September 9. It seems it may be signed soon. It has been a long process even to get this far. Can you share your opinion? Well, commentators sometimes refer to this as a peace process, but that’s a misnomer. They’re not talking about peace. They’re talking about the technicalities of the ceasefire agreement. And normally, a ceasefire can just be announced. They stop shooting at each other, they sit down, they talk, you reach a consensus, you sign an agreement on political issues. Here, they’re putting the cart before the horse, and they want to talk about an agreement before they’ve even discussed any political issues. That’s not going to work..."
Author/creator: Aung Zaw + Bertil Lintner
Language: English
Source/publisher: "The Irrawaddy"
Format/size: Adobe Flash, html
Date of entry/update: 03 September 2015


Title: Rohingya Women Flee Violence Only to Be Sold Into Marriage (text, video)
Date of publication: 02 August 2015
Description/subject: "GELUGOR, Malaysia — The young woman had been penned in a camp in the sweltering jungle of southern Thailand for two months when she was offered a deal. She fled Myanmar this year hoping to reach safety in Malaysia, after anti-Muslim rioters burned her village. But her family could not afford the $1,260 the smugglers demanded to complete the journey. A stranger was willing to pay for her freedom, the smugglers said, if she agreed to marry him. “I was allowed to call my parents, and they said that if I was willing, it would be better for all the family,” said the woman, Shahidah Yunus, 22. “I understood what I must do.” She joined the hundreds of young Rohingya women from Myanmar sold into marriage to Rohingya men already in Malaysia as the price of escaping violence and poverty in their homeland. While some Rohingya women agree to such marriages to escape imprisonment or worse at the hands of smugglers, others are tricked or coerced. Some are only teenagers. Continue reading the main story RELATED COVERAGE France and Britain Seek Help on Calais Migrants From E.U.AUG. 2, 2015 A Bangladeshi Town in Human Trafficking’s GripJULY 23, 2015 Jubair, 13, was left behind when his mother and siblings fled Myanmar for Malaysia. “I didn’t know about it,” he said. “She could not find me. She could not tell me.”A Migrant Mother’s Anguished ChoiceJULY 5, 2015 Oma Salema, 12, holding her undernourished brother, Ayub Khan, 1, in Sittwe Camp.Myanmar to Bar Rohingya From Fleeing, but Won’t Address Their PlightJUNE 12, 2015 Malaysia offers at least some modicum of opportunity for Rohingya migrants. Rohingya gathered at an apartment block in Kuala Lumpur that is home to several families.Even in Safety of Malaysia, Rohingya Migrants Face Bleak ProspectsJUNE 3, 2015 Rohingya migrants with airdropped food. A boat carrying them and scores of others, including young children, was found floating in Thai waters; passengers said several people had died.Rohingya Migrants From Myanmar, Shunned by Malaysia, Are Spotted Adrift in Andaman SeaMAY 14, 2015 How Myanmar and Its Neighbors Are Responding to the Rohingya CrisisMAY 14, 2015 Their numbers are difficult to gauge, but officials and activists estimate that in recent years hundreds, if not thousands, of Rohingya women every year have been married off this way, and that their numbers have been increasing..."
Author/creator: Chris Buckley, Ellen Barry
Language: English
Source/publisher: "New York Times"
Format/size: html, Adobe Flash
Date of entry/update: 20 August 2015


Title: Human Rights Council - 29th Session: Situation of human rights of Rohingya Muslims and other minorities in Myanmar (text + video)
Date of publication: 03 July 2015
Description/subject: Full text of the resolution tabled by Pakistan for the Organization of the Islamic Conference (OIC), adopted by consensus (without a vote), 3 July 2015. The Alternate URLs link to the webcast of the meetings.
Language: English
Source/publisher: UN Human Rights Council (A/HRC/29/L.30)
Format/size: pdf (171K) Adobe Flash
Alternate URLs: http://webtv.un.org/watch/ahrc29l.30-postponed-item2-42nd-meeting-29th-regular-session-human-rights... (Webcast of the first part of the debate, 2 July. Statements by Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Latvia, USA, Russia, Japan, China, India, Vietnam, Pakistan. The Myanmar section of the meeting from 7.42 minutes to 23.50 minutes) ... http://webtv.un.org/watch/ahrc29l.30-vote-item2-44th-meeting-29th-regular-session-human-rights-coun... (Webcast of the continuation of the debate, 3 July - statements by Myanmar, Cuba, Venezuela, President of the Council: adoption of the resolution.)
Date of entry/update: 06 July 2015


Title: Unwanted: Myanmar's Rohingya Muslims Thousands flee to escape poverty and persecution. (video)
Date of publication: 25 May 2015
Description/subject: "Thousands of Rohingya adrift in the Andaman Sea with limited access to food and water may soon have shelter, at least temporarily. After weeks of turning away unseaworthy boats packed with migrants, Malaysia and Indonesia have now committed to providing immediate humanitarian aid and shelter for one year. Until recently governments have been reluctant to help, fearing a flood of refugees. Myanmar does not recognise the Rohingya and refutes accusations that their treatment of the ethnic minority is to blame for the crisis. Rohingya Muslims are considered one of the world’s most persecuted people by the UN. How should regional governments and the international community respond to this ongoing crisis? ... On this episode of The Stream, we speak to: Zaw Naing @Zw_Naing Rohingya activist in exile Shwe Maung @ShweMaung_MP Member of Parliament, Buthidaung Constituency, Rakhine State Charles Santiago @mpklang Malaysian Member of Parliament charlessantiago.org Matthew Smith @matthewfsmith Executive Director, Fortify Rights
Language: English
Source/publisher: Aljazeera (The Stream)
Format/size: Adobe Flash (36 minutes)
Date of entry/update: 26 May 2015


Title: Saving people 'key right now' as migrants adrift and in limbo on boats off Thailand (video)
Date of publication: 15 May 2015
Description/subject: Saving lives needs to be the priority as thousands of migrants sit stuck on boats in the seas off Thailand with nowhere to go after being knocked back by country after country, argues Human Rights Watch Deputy Director in Asia Phil Robertson....Video and transcript.
Author/creator: Phil Robertson, Joe O'Brien
Language: English
Source/publisher: Australian Broadcasting Corporation
Format/size: html.Adobe Flash - 6.30 minutes)
Date of entry/update: 17 May 2015


Title: Myanmar's Smart Farmers - How low-cost solutions are keeping farmers in Myanmar one step ahead of climate change. (video)
Date of publication: 04 May 2015
Description/subject: "Practically isolated from the global market for 50 years, Myanmar is still largely dependent on agriculture. But the country is one of the most at risk from climate change and no one feels these pressures more than the rural smallholder farmers who make up the backbone of its food system and rural economy. Shorter monsoons and rising temperatures mean severe droughts have become more frequent in recent decades. This has led to higher levels of saltwater intrusion in important rice growing territories and an increase in the risk of complete crop failure. Proximity Designs is a social enterprise which was founded to provide farmers with low-cost, low-tech equipment to help them adapt and thrive in their changing environment. They ensure their products are both affordable and suitable by employing a team of data-gatherers to conduct thorough research within the farming communities. And thanks to a network of some 900 scooter-driving "field agents", their products can even find their way to the most remote parts of the country. Russell Beard travels to Myanmar to meet the innovators behind Proximity Designs and to see how their products and expertise are helping farmers stay one step ahead in a changing world."
Author/creator: Russell Beard
Language: English, Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: Al Jazeera (Earthrise)
Format/size: Adobe Flash (15 minutes)
Date of entry/update: 24 August 2015


Title: Myanmar: Portraits of Diversity: Saw Poe Kwar (video)
Date of publication: April 2015
Description/subject: "Commissioned by CPCS, Myanmar: Portraits of Diversity is a series of short films seeking to stimulate discussion and move audiences towards recognizing, accepting, and celebrating religious diversity in Myanmar. Directed by Kannan Arunasalam, the films present individuals from Myanmar’s different religious communities and highlight the inter-faith connections and engagement that take place naturally around the country. Featuring stories of cooperation across religious and ethnic divides, as well as the capacity for peace leadership within the country, community leaders share analysis and insights into the threat of inter-communal violence and illustrate the capacity for peace leadership...The film series seeks to stimulate alternative narratives regarding ethnic and spiritual issues in Myanmar where tolerance and cooperation are highlighted, rather than conflict and persecution. Screened together with guided reflections, the films can be used as tools to stimulate exchanges of ideas about diversity and tolerance, and to create a space to foster acceptance and share visions for the future. The issues raised by individuals featured in the films can be used to generate discussions on Myanmar’s different religious communities and highlight the kinds of inter-faith connections and engagement that take place naturally around the country. A discussion and study guide is available for each video portrait, followed by suggested activities that can also be adapted to different learning environments. For each film, background is provided on the person and their context, followed by five discussion questions and extension activities..."
Language: English and Burmese
Source/publisher: Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies (CPCS)
Format/size: Vimeo player (5:05 minutes)
Alternate URLs: http://www.centrepeaceconflictstudies.org/interventions/myanmar-portraits-of-diversity/
Date of entry/update: 29 September 2015


Title: Myanmar: Portraits of Diversity: U Aye Lwin (video)
Date of publication: April 2015
Description/subject: ""Commissioned by CPCS, Myanmar: Portraits of Diversity is a series of short films seeking to stimulate discussion and move audiences towards recognizing, accepting, and celebrating religious diversity in Myanmar. Directed by Kannan Arunasalam, the films present individuals from Myanmar’s different religious communities and highlight the inter-faith connections and engagement that take place naturally around the country. Featuring stories of cooperation across religious and ethnic divides, as well as the capacity for peace leadership within the country, community leaders share analysis and insights into the threat of inter-communal violence and illustrate the capacity for peace leadership...The film series seeks to stimulate alternative narratives regarding ethnic and spiritual issues in Myanmar where tolerance and cooperation are highlighted, rather than conflict and persecution. Screened together with guided reflections, the films can be used as tools to stimulate exchanges of ideas about diversity and tolerance, and to create a space to foster acceptance and share visions for the future. The issues raised by individuals featured in the films can be used to generate discussions on Myanmar’s different religious communities and highlight the kinds of inter-faith connections and engagement that take place naturally around the country. A discussion and study guide is available for each video portrait, followed by suggested activities that can also be adapted to different learning environments. For each film, background is provided on the person and their context, followed by five discussion questions and extension activities..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies (CPCS)
Format/size: Vimeo player (4: 02 minutes)
Alternate URLs: http://www.centrepeaceconflictstudies.org/interventions/myanmar-portraits-of-diversity/
Date of entry/update: 30 September 2015


Title: Myanmar: Portraits of Diversity: U Nay Win (video)
Date of publication: April 2015
Description/subject: "Commissioned by CPCS, Myanmar: Portraits of Diversity is a series of short films seeking to stimulate discussion and move audiences towards recognizing, accepting, and celebrating religious diversity in Myanmar. Directed by Kannan Arunasalam, the films present individuals from Myanmar’s different religious communities and highlight the inter-faith connections and engagement that take place naturally around the country. Featuring stories of cooperation across religious and ethnic divides, as well as the capacity for peace leadership within the country, community leaders share analysis and insights into the threat of inter-communal violence and illustrate the capacity for peace leadership...The film series seeks to stimulate alternative narratives regarding ethnic and spiritual issues in Myanmar where tolerance and cooperation are highlighted, rather than conflict and persecution. Screened together with guided reflections, the films can be used as tools to stimulate exchanges of ideas about diversity and tolerance, and to create a space to foster acceptance and share visions for the future. The issues raised by individuals featured in the films can be used to generate discussions on Myanmar’s different religious communities and highlight the kinds of inter-faith connections and engagement that take place naturally around the country. A discussion and study guide is available for each video portrait, followed by suggested activities that can also be adapted to different learning environments. For each film, background is provided on the person and their context, followed by five discussion questions and extension activities..."
Language: English and Burmese
Source/publisher: Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies (CPCS)
Format/size: Vimeo player (6:09 minutes)
Alternate URLs: http://www.centrepeaceconflictstudies.org/interventions/myanmar-portraits-of-diversity/
Date of entry/update: 29 September 2015


Title: Myanmar: Portraits of Diversity: Venerable Tayzar Dipati (video)
Date of publication: April 2015
Description/subject: "Commissioned by CPCS, Myanmar: Portraits of Diversity is a series of short films seeking to stimulate discussion and move audiences towards recognizing, accepting, and celebrating religious diversity in Myanmar. Directed by Kannan Arunasalam, the films present individuals from Myanmar’s different religious communities and highlight the inter-faith connections and engagement that take place naturally around the country. Featuring stories of cooperation across religious and ethnic divides, as well as the capacity for peace leadership within the country, community leaders share analysis and insights into the threat of inter-communal violence and illustrate the capacity for peace leadership...The film series seeks to stimulate alternative narratives regarding ethnic and spiritual issues in Myanmar where tolerance and cooperation are highlighted, rather than conflict and persecution. Screened together with guided reflections, the films can be used as tools to stimulate exchanges of ideas about diversity and tolerance, and to create a space to foster acceptance and share visions for the future. The issues raised by individuals featured in the films can be used to generate discussions on Myanmar’s different religious communities and highlight the kinds of inter-faith connections and engagement that take place naturally around the country. A discussion and study guide is available for each video portrait, followed by suggested activities that can also be adapted to different learning environments. For each film, background is provided on the person and their context, followed by five discussion questions and extension activities..."
Language: English and Burmese
Source/publisher: Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies (CPCS)
Format/size: Vimeo player (4:57 minutes)
Alternate URLs: http://www.centrepeaceconflictstudies.org/interventions/myanmar-portraits-of-diversity/
Date of entry/update: 30 September 2015


Title: On The Land We Live - A film about land reform in Myanmar (video)
Date of publication: 17 March 2015
Description/subject: Documentary by the Land Core Group Myanmar, where 70% of the Myanmar population are smallholder farmers, about the challenges faced by poor farmers from land grabbing and land dispossession in rural Myanmar...Interviews with land activists and dispossessed farmers in different parts of the country... sections on: resistance to land-grabbing; Myanmar land law and policies (where customary tenure and women's land rights are not explicitly recognised); efficiency of smallholder practice...
Language: English, Burmese/ ျမန္မာဘာသာ (English voice-over and subtitles)
Source/publisher: Land Core Group of the Food Security Working Group
Format/size: Adobe Flash (20 minutes)
Alternate URLs: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xztU_f6QsrU&feature=youtu.be
Date of entry/update: 18 March 2015


Title: Working Together for a Better Kachin Landscape (Sound)
Date of publication: 2015
Description/subject: Forestry Water Management, Landscape Approach and Land Management in Kachin State, northern Myanmar.
Language: English
Source/publisher: CGIAR
Format/size: Windows Media Player (14MB)
Date of entry/update: 21 February 2016


Title: Al Jazeera Investigates - The Hidden Genocide (video)
Date of publication: 09 December 2012
Description/subject: "Earlier this year a Buddhist woman was raped and murdered in western Myanmar. The authorities charged three Muslim men. A week later, 10 Muslims were murdered in a revenge attack. What happened next was hidden from the outside world. Bloodshed pitted Buddhists against minority Rohingya Muslims. Many Rohingya fled their homes, which were burned down in what they said was a deliberate attempt by the predominantly Buddhist government to drive them out of the country. "They were shooting and we were also fighting. The fields were filled with bodies and soaked with blood," says Mohammed Islam, who fled with his family to Bangladesh. There are 400,000 Rohingya languishing in Bangladesh. For more than three decades, waves of refugees have fled Myanmar. But the government of Bangladesh considers the Rohingya to be illegal immigrants, as does the government of Myanmar. They have no legal rights and nowhere to go. This is a story of a people fleeing the land where they were born, of a people deprived of citizenship in their homeland. It is the story of the Rohingya of western Myanmar, whose very existence as a people is denied. Professor William Schabas, the former president of the International Association of Genocide Scholars, says: "When you see measures preventing births, trying to deny the identity of the people, hoping to see that they really are eventually, that they no longer exist; denying their history, denying the legitimacy of their right to live where they live, these are all warning signs that mean it's not frivolous to envisage the use of the term genocide."
Author/creator: Paul Rees
Language: Voice-over and sub-titles, English
Source/publisher: Al Jazeera via Youtube
Format/size: Adobe Flash (50 minutes)
Alternate URLs: http://www.aljazeera.com/programmes/aljazeerainvestigates/2012/12/2012125122215836351.html
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=54RzqiXLvnw&feature=youtube_gdata_player
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CqCcoXVb-fI
Date of entry/update: 10 December 2012


Title: Aung San Suu Kyi talks to Charlie Rose in New York (video)
Date of publication: 21 September 2012
Description/subject: in "Current Affairs"
Language: English
Source/publisher: Charlie Rose
Format/size: Adobe Flash (14 minutes)
Alternate URLs: http://www.charlierose.com/view/interview/12564
Date of entry/update: 25 September 2012


Title: Daw Aung San Suu Kyi accepts the Chatham House Prize 2011, (video)
Date of publication: 01 December 2011
Description/subject: Aung San Suu Kyi, Burmese democracy campaigner, has been voted the winner of the Chatham House Prize 2011. Madeleine Albright will receive the Prize on behalf of Aung San Suu Kyi at an award ceremony and dinner... Aung San Suu Kyi recorded a video message for Chatham House, in which she accepts the award (received on her behalf by Madeleine Albright) and discusses reform in Burma.... The alternate link leads to a video and transcripts: Opening Remarks, Dr Robin Niblett (video)... Award Presentation, Aung San Suu Kyi (video message) Award Presentation, Madeleine Albright (video)... Keynote Address, Malcolm Brinded (transcript)... Keynote Address, Lord Howell (transcript)... Keynote Address, Lord Ashdown (transcript)... Closing Remarks, DeAnne Julius (transcript.
Author/creator: Aung San Suu Kyi
Language: English
Source/publisher: Chatham House Videos via Youtube
Format/size: Adobe Flash, html (alternate link)
Alternate URLs: http://www.chathamhouse.org/chatham-house-prize/2011
Date of entry/update: 10 December 2011


Title: The world's longest ongoing war (video)
Date of publication: 11 August 2011
Description/subject: "For more than 60 years, Karen rebels have been fighting a civil war against the government of Myanmar...In February 1949, members of the Karen ethnic minority launched an armed insurrection against Myanmar's central government. In pictures: Sixty years of war. Over 60 years later, the conflict continues, with more than a dozen ethnic rebel groups waging war against the army in their fight for self-rule. Now, the war is entering a new and bloody stage. Myanmar is the only regime still regularly planting anti-personnel mines. But it is not only the army that uses them. Rebel groups also regularly use homemade landmines or mines seized from the military. As the conflict escalates, civilians are trapped in the middle of some of the worst fighting in decades. 101 East travels to Myanmar, home to the world's longest running civil war."
Language: English, Karen (English sub-titles)
Source/publisher: Al Jazeera (101 East)
Format/size: html, Adobe Flash (25 minutes)
Date of entry/update: 27 December 2011


Title: The Karen struggle (Video)
Date of publication: 21 February 2009
Description/subject: Untold stories in Myanmar obscured by the catastrophic Cyclone Nargis...based on a media trip organised by Burma Campaign UK
Author/creator: Simon Ostrovsky (Director)
Language: English
Source/publisher: Al-Jazeera (Listening Post) via Youtube
Format/size: Adobe Flash (9 minutes, 52 seconds)
Date of entry/update: 23 February 2009


Title: Obsolete ASEAN (video)
Date of publication: 12 February 2009
Description/subject: 2-part documentary on the abuse, push-backs and deaths of Rohingya boat-people arriving in Thailand, followed by a discussion on how ASEAN could help in such regional situations. The participants in the discussion were Surin Pitsuwan (Secretary-General of ASEAN), Bunn Nagara (Associate Editor of "The Star", Malaysia) and Dr Thitinan Pongsudirak, a Thai political analyst. There were references to the human rights components of the ASEAN Charter and the "Myanmar problem"
Language: English
Source/publisher: Aljazeera (101 EAST)
Format/size: Adobe Flash (2 parts: 22 minutes, 55 seconds, total)
Alternate URLs: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qMNbLmnKg38 (Part 1)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y1ilotE9Wmk (Part 2)
Date of entry/update: 13 February 2009


Title: "Burma in Spotlight" (video)
Date of publication: 11 May 2008
Description/subject: A deeper look into the aftermath of Cyclone Nargis.
Author/creator: Dan Rivers
Language: English
Source/publisher: CNN via SBS via Youtube
Format/size: Adobe Flash video (3minutes, 43 seconds)
Date of entry/update: 10 January 2009


Title: The Crisis in Burma: In Search of a Unified Response -- a Panel Discussion on the Crisis in Burma (video)
Date of publication: 11 May 2008
Description/subject: Join us as the Asia Society and Open Society Institute convene a panel discussion to revisit the situation in Burma in light of the military government's recently announced "roadmap to democracy," including its intention to conduct a national referendum to approve a new constitution in May, followed by a multiparty general election in 2010. How credible is this development given that the new constitution would effectively bar independent political leaders from participating in the process? The panel will also assess recent efforts at the international and regional levels to advance national reconciliation in Burma. What role can and should international actors such as the United Nations and the United States play together with ASEAN and Burma's influential neighbors?
Author/creator: Sean Turnell, Scot Marciel, and Thaung Htun
Language: English
Source/publisher: Asia Society, Open Society Institute
Format/size: Adobe Flash (1 hour, 33 minutes)
Date of entry/update: 12 January 2009


Title: Crackdown in the Heart of Burma (video)
Date of publication: October 2007
Description/subject: 2-part video...REPORTERS part2: In October 2007, thousands of monks and ordinary Burmese spoke out against more than 40 years of military rule. In November 2008, FRANCE 24's reporter Cyril Payen was awarded an Association of International Broadcasting prize for this report.
Author/creator: Cyril Payen
Language: English commentary, Burmese, Karen
Source/publisher: France 24
Format/size: Adobe Flash (17 minutes 25 seconds total)
Alternate URLs: http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x7e8ra_crackdown-in-the-heart-of-burma-par_news
Date of entry/update: 13 January 2009


Title: Histories of Burma with Thant Myint-U (video)
Date of publication: 22 February 2007
Description/subject: For nearly two decades Western governments and a growing activist community have been frustrated in their attempts to bring about a freer and more democratic Burma - through sanctions and tourist boycotts - only to see an apparent slide toward even harsher dictatorship. But what do we really know about Burma and its history and its struggles? In his new book, "The River of Lost Footsteps", Thant Myint-U tells the story of modern Burma, in part through a telling of his own family's history. His maternal grandfather, U Thant, rose from being the schoolmaster of a small town in Burma to become the UN secretary-general in the 1960s. Through their stories and others, he portrays Burma's rise and decline in the modern world, from the time of Portuguese pirates and renegade Mughal princes through the decades of British colonialism, and a sixty-year civil war that continues today and is the longest-running war anywhere in the world. The World Affairs Council was founded in 1947 out of the interest generated by the founding of the United Nations in San Francisco in 1945. With over 10,000 members, they are the largest international affairs organization on the west coast."
Author/creator: Thant Myint-U
Language: English
Source/publisher: World Affairs Council via fora.tv
Format/size: Adobe Flash (57 minutes)
Date of entry/update: 12 January 2009


Title: Steps to freedom (video)
Date of publication: 17 December 2006
Description/subject: The video records the activities of a team from Free Burma Rangers assisting IDPs in Karen and Karenni States. Assistance included mine-clearing, medical treatment, distribution of relief and educational supplies, treatment and transport of a landmine victim, protection of displaced villagers against Burma army units and escorting the villagers to a safer area. The team photographed attacked villages and conducted interviews.
Language: English commentary and sub-titles, Karen
Source/publisher: Free Burma Rangers
Format/size: Adobe Flash (18 minutes 33 seconds)
Alternate URLs: http://www.freeburmarangers.org
Date of entry/update: 13 January 2009


Title: "Shoot on Sight: The ongoing SPDC offensive against villages in northern Karen State" (video)
Date of publication: December 2006
Description/subject: "This video documents the horrendous situation that villagers in Toungoo, Nyaung Lay Bin and Muthraw Districts are facing and includes testimonies from villagers affected by this offensive. Throughout this military campaign, which began in November 2005 and is still continuing, villages have been shelled with mortars, looted and burnt to the ground. Crops and food supplies have been destroyed. Burmese soldiers are ordered to shoot on sight regardless of whether it is a combatant or a defenseless civilian. As a result more than 27,000 people have been forced from their homes, either hiding in the jungle or trying to find refuge in Thailand. The Burmese army continues to increase its military presence in these areas and carry out attacks against villagers. Thousands of lives have been affected by this offensive and many have been lost - all valuable and irreplaceable.... The video calls for increased cross border humanitarian assistance, for ASEAN to take a stronger stance against the regime and for a United Nations Security Council Resolution on Burma."
Language: English, Karen
Source/publisher: Burma Issues/Witness
Format/size: Adobe Flash video (Burma Issues version, 9,47 minutes; Youtube, 2 parts, 14 minutes total)
Alternate URLs: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VVQOLk_i5Ps&feature=PlayList&p=D740418AE9AFE4C8&playnext=1&index=52
http://hub.witness.org/shootonsight
Date of entry/update: 10 January 2009


Title: "Nightmare in Eastern Burma" (video)
Date of publication: 16 November 2006
Description/subject: Burmese forces are waging the largest military offensive against their own people in more than a decade, targeting the country's eastern ethnic groups with violence and destruction. Tens of thousands of refugees, mostly Karen minorities, are abandoning villages in search of safety in Thailand
Language: English commentary, Karen
Source/publisher: Travis Fox, Washington Post via Free Burma Rangers
Format/size: Adobe Flash (6 minutes, 29 seconds)
Date of entry/update: 12 January 2009


Title: "Burma: State of Fear" (video)
Date of publication: 31 October 2006
Description/subject: FRONTLINE/World reporter Evan Williams travels undercover to Burma to expose the violence and repression carried out by Burma's government against its own people....It's nighttime and FRONTLINE/World reporter Evan Williams is on a tense drive along the Thai/Burma border with members of the Karen National Union guerrilla army. The guerilla group has offered to take Williams into Burma, where they are working with a humanitarian group called the Free Burma Rangers to dispense aid. Several hundred thousand displaced people from Burma are hiding out in the jungle, driven from their villages by the country's brutal military regime. On foot, Williams travels under darkness to camps that have recently been attacked by government troops. The Karen foot soldiers know the territory well. Burma's military campaign against the Karen people has been going on for the past 50 years. The terrain is dangerous and heavily mined. The reporter is guided to the village of He Daw Kaw, where he meets Nah Pi. She used to be the village schoolteacher and tells Williams what happened to her home..."..... About half the video ijnvloves reporting, interviews and archival footage from Rangoon and other parts of Burma.....The Alternate URL has links to additional resources, political timeline, Aung San Suu Kyi, other voices of Burma etc......(This video is not to be confused with John Pilger's "Inside Burma, Land of Fear" qv in this section of OBL)
Author/creator: Evan Williams
Language: English commentary
Source/publisher: PBS Frontline/World
Format/size: Quicktime/Real Player (26 minutes)
Alternate URLs: http://www.pbs.org/frontlineworld/stories/burma601/video_index.html
Date of entry/update: 12 January 2009


Title: "In Hiding: A year of survival under the Burma Army 2004-2005" (video)
Date of publication: 29 November 2005
Description/subject: "In Hiding" is a detailed account of human rights abuses committed by the Burma Army against ethnic minorities inside Burma over a one year period. It is an unrelenting documentary of disturbing images and firsthand stories; unadulterated evidence that the brutal military dictatorship of Burma continues its tyranny. And yet the film shows a people who resist the Burma Army and who, despite incredible difficulty, have hope.
Language: English commentary, Karen
Source/publisher: Front Films / Free Burma Rangers via Google video
Format/size: Adobe Flash, (12 minutes, 42 seconds)
Date of entry/update: 12 January 2009


Title: "Always on the Run -- Internally Displaced People in Karen State" (video)
Date of publication: February 2005
Description/subject: "An estimated 540,000 people were internally displaced in eastern Burma, on the run, or living in forced relocation sites. In the video three internally displaced people (IDPs) talk about their hopes and fears for themselves and their children and the impact that being forced to flee for their lives has on their ability to nurture and care for their families. A week after the footage was filmed the offensive reached this area and these IDPs were forced to flee, again."
Language: Karen, (English sub-titles)
Source/publisher: Burma Issues
Format/size: Adobe Flash video (5:35 minutes)
Date of entry/update: 10 January 2009


Title: "Fear and Hope: Responding to Burma
Date of publication: 24 February 2004
Description/subject: Documentary about the plight of internally displaced people in Burma, and what's being done by the Free Burma Rangers to help
Language: English commentary, Karen
Source/publisher: Front Films / Free Burma Rangers via Google video
Format/size: Adobe Flash (6 minutes)
Date of entry/update: 12 January 2009


Title: Aung San Suu Kyi on non-violence (video)
Date of publication: 1999
Description/subject: In support of the current protests in Burma, the is an excerpt from an interview I shot in Rangoon in 1999. Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, the Nobel Peace Prize Winner currently under house arrest, and leader of the nonviolent movement for human rights and democracy in Burma speaks on the non-violent approach. Full interview (33 mins) available to Free Burma organizations.
Author/creator: Daw Aung San Suu Kyi
Language: English
Source/publisher: nancatube via Youtube
Format/size: Adobe Flash video (2 minutes 15 seconds)
Date of entry/update: 10 January 2009


Title: "Inside Burma Land of Fear" (video)
Date of publication: 1996
Description/subject: "John Pilger and David Munro go undercover in one of the world's most isolated, and extraordinary countries, Burma, which Amnesty International calls 'a prison without bars'. They discover slave labour preparing for tourism and foreign investment. International Actual Award for Risk Journalism, Barcelona, Spain, 1996; Bronze Plaque in the category of 'Social Issues - International Relations', The Chris Awards, Ohio, 1996; Gold Special Jury Award, 'Film & Video Production division', WorldFest-Charleston, 1996; Award for Best Factual Programme, RTS Midland Centre Awards, Birmingham, 1996; Gold Apple in the category 'Politics: Social organisations in other lands', National Educational Media Network Film & Video Competition at The 1997 NEMN Apple Awards, Oakland, California, 1997; the updated version won a Gold Special Jury Award in the 'Film & Video Production division', WorldFest-Houston, 1999."...The original version disappeared from the Internet. We retain the original metadata for this Youtube version [October 2017]
Author/creator: John Pilger, David Munro
Language: English
Source/publisher: Carlton Films (UK)
Format/size: Adobe Flash (51 minutes) Download and play unless you have a fast connection)
Date of entry/update: 24 October 2017


Title: WW2 Burma 1942 - 1944 (video)
Date of publication: 1974
Description/subject: The Burma Campaign of WW2. Mainly military action and jungle scenes. Video in 3 parts.
Language: English
Source/publisher: "The World at War" series
Format/size: Adobe Flash (3 parts: each of 16.21 minutes -- 48 minutes, 63 seconds total)
Alternate URLs: http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x3s6xx_ww2-burma-1942-1944-part-2_shortfilms
http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x3s6zc_ww2-burma-1942-1944-part-3_shortfilms
Date of entry/update: 12 January 2009