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Home > Main Library > Human Rights > Various Rights > National Human Rights Institutions > Theory and practice of national human rights institutions

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Theory and practice of national human rights institutions

Websites/Multiple Documents

Title: National Human Rights Institutions - UNHCHR page
Description/subject: GA and CHR reports and resolutions on NHRIs; links to: Paris Principles (October 1991), Rabat Declaration (April 2000), Lome Declaration (March 2001), Athens Declaration (November 2001) etc. Also, UN Fact sheet, "National Institutions for the Promotion and Protection of Human Rights".
Language: English (also available in Arabic, Chinese, French, Russian and Spanish)
Source/publisher: United Nations
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: The Paris Principles - From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Description/subject: "The Paris Principles were defined at the first International Workshop on National Institutions for the Promotion and Protection of Human Rights held in Paris on 7-9 October 1991. They were adopted by the United Nations Human Rights Commission by Resolution 1992/54 of 1992, and by the UN General Assembly in its Resolution 48/134 of 1993. The Paris Principles relate to the status and functioning of national institutions for the protection and promotion of human rights. In addition to exchanging views on existing arrangements, the workshop participants drew up a comprehensive series of recommendations on the role, composition, status and functions of national human rights institutions (NHRIs)... Five stipulations: The Paris Principles list a number of responsibilities for national institutions, which fall under five headings. First, the institution shall monitor any situation of violation of human rights which it decides to take up. Second, the institution shall be able to advise the Government, the Parliament and any other competent body on specific violations, on issues related to legislation and general compliance and implementation with international human rights instruments. Third, the institution shall relate to regional and international organizations. Fourth, the institution shall have a mandate to educate and inform in the field of human rights. Fifth, some institutions are given a quasi-judicial competence. "The key elements of the composition of a national institution are its independence and pluralism. In relation to the independence the only guidance in the Paris Principles is that the appointment of commissioners or other kinds of key personnel shall be given effect by an official Act, establishing the specific duration of the mandate, which may be renewable." Compliance with the Paris Principles is the central requirement of the accreditation process that regulates NHRI access to the United Nations Human Rights Council and other bodies. This is a peer review system operated by a subcommittee of the International Coordinating Committee of NHRIs..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Wikipedia
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 10 September 2011


Individual Documents

Title: Performance & legitimacy: national human rights institutions (2nd edition)
Date of publication: 2004
Description/subject: "Many national human rights commissions have been created in the last decade. This document summarises the findings of a research project to examine how successfully such institutions promote and protect human rights in their societies. It looks at what NHRIs have done well and, based on the experience of specific institutions in a range of countries, what they might do to be more effective..."
Author/creator: Richard Carver
Language: English
Source/publisher: International Council on Human Rights Policy
Format/size: pdf (1.13MB)
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: Principles relating to the Status of National Institutions (The Paris Principles)
Date of publication: 20 December 1993
Description/subject: Adopted by General Assembly resolution 48/134 of 20 December 1993 ...Five stipulations The Paris Principles list a number of responsibilities for national institutions, which fall under five headings. First, the institution shall monitor any situation of violation of human rights which it decides to take up. Second, the institution shall be able to advise the Government, the Parliament and any other competent body on specific violations, on issues related to legislation and general compliance and implementation with international human rights instruments. Third, the institution shall relate to regional and international organizations. Fourth, the institution shall have a mandate to educate and inform in the field of human rights. Fifth, some institutions are given a quasi-judicial competence. [2] "The key elements of the composition of a national institution are its independence and pluralism. In relation to the independence the only guidance in the Paris Principles is that the appointment of commissioners or other kinds of key personnel shall be given effect by an official Act, establishing the specific duration of the mandate, which may be renewable." [3] Compliance with the Paris Principles is the central requirement of the accreditation process that regulates NHRI access to the United Nations Human Rights Council and other bodies. This is a peer review system operated by a subcommittee of the International Coordinating Committee of NHRIs. (from the Wikipedia page on the Paris Principles)
Language: English (Arabic, Chinese,French, Russian and Spanish also avaialble)
Source/publisher: United Nations
Format/size: pdf (17K, 22K))
Alternate URLs: http://daccess-dds-ny.un.org/doc/UNDOC/GEN/N94/116/24/PDF/N9411624.pdf?OpenElement (A/RES/48/134)
Date of entry/update: 10 September 2011