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Climate Change - Burma/Myanmar: general

Websites/Multiple Documents

Title: Youtube search for Burma OR Myanmar Climate Change (videos)
Date of publication: 01 May 2018
Description/subject: About 38,500 results (May 2018)
Language: English, Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: Various sources via Youtube
Format/size: Adobe Flash or html5
Date of entry/update: 01 May 2018


Title: DEPARTMENT OF METEOROLOGY AND HYDROLOGY (MYANMAR)
Description/subject: "Objectives of the DMH is as follows: (1) To take precautionary measures against and minimize the effects of natural disasters (2) To promote safety, comfort, efficiency and regularity of air, land (rail & road), sea and inland water transportation. (3) To bring sustainable development of natural resources (hydro electric power, forest produce, water use, wind energy, etc.) (4) To promote agricultural and food production. (5) To ensure efficient operation, planning and development of activities in natural defense, industry, health, social welfare and all sectors of national economy. (6) To undertake international collaboration for all development activities and works of the DMH"
Language: English, Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: DEPARTMENT OF METEOROLOGY AND HYDROLOGY (MYANMAR)
Format/size: html
Alternate URLs: http://www.dmh.gov.mm/
Date of entry/update: 01 December 2016


Title: Global Climate Change Alliance (Myanmar)
Description/subject: See also the Myanmar Climate Change Alliance (Alternate URL, below)
Language: English, French
Source/publisher: Global Climate Change Alliance
Format/size: html
Alternate URLs: http://myanmarccalliance.org/en/home/
Date of entry/update: 26 April 2017


Title: Google search results for Burma OR Myanmar climate change
Description/subject: About 1,480,000 results (May 2018)
Language: English, Burmese
Source/publisher: Various sources via Google
Format/size: Adobe Flash or html5
Date of entry/update: 30 April 2018


Title: Myanmar - Climate Change
Description/subject: Thematic profiles and systems: AQUASTAT country profile - The AQUASTAT country profiles describe the state of water resources and agricultural water use in the respective country. Special attention is given to the water resource, irrigation, and drainage sub-sectors... FAO-GeoNetwork - FAO-GeoNetwork is a web based Geographic Data and Information Management System. It enables easy access to local and distributed geospatial information catalogues and makes available, data, graphics and documents for immediate download. FAO-GeoNetwork holds approximately 5000 standardized metadata records for digital and paper maps, most of them at the global, continent and national level... Reports and statistical data: AQUASTAT country fact sheet - AQUASTAT Long-term average annual renewable water resources by country - Forest area statistics - From Forestry Country Profiles Forest health statistics - From Forestry Country Profiles Growing stock statistics - From Forestry Country Profiles
Language: English
Source/publisher: Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO)
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 21 August 2012


Title: Myanmar Climate Change Alliance (MCCA)
Description/subject: "The Myanmar Climate Change Alliance (MCCA) was launched in 2013 with the support of the Global Climate Change Alliance (GCCA) and is being implemented by the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-Habitat) and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). The Programme works as a platform to mainstream climate change into the Myanmar policy development and reform agenda, but it also supports all on-going actions and activities on climate change from the National Government, Local Authorities, NGOs, Development partners, Civil Society and the Private Sector. This recognizes that climate change, as a global challenge, can only be addressed by an alliance of partners, from local to global level. MCCA is the key platform for this in Myanmar..."
Language: English, Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: Myanmar Climate Change Alliance (MCCA)
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 26 April 2017


Title: Myanmar Climate Change Watch
Description/subject: An apocalyptic series of earthquakes, cyclones, tsunamis and floods in the region has spooked everyone. Many people have turned to soothsayers and astrologers for advice about any impending natural disasters. But rather than consult the Mayan calender or a fortune-teller, The Irrawaddy reporter Min Naing Thu interviewed Dr Tun Lwin, the former director-general of Burma's Department of Meteorology and Hydrology (DMH). Since his resignation from the DMH in 2009, Tun Lwin has served as a technical adviser to the Regional Integrated Multi-hazard Early Warning System (RIMES) at the Asian Institute of Technology in Thailand. He also served as a consultant to the Myanmar Red Cross Society, CARE Myanmar, Action Aid Myanmar and Myanmar Egress's Network Activities Group. He has also been involved with the International Centre for Water Hazard and Risk Management (ICHARM), Myanmar Egress, World Vision Myanmar, Global Green and other organizations, focusing primarily on climate change and how to minimize damage caused by natural disasters. Tun Lwin posts many of his articles concerning meteorological issues on his website, Myanmar Climate Change Watch.
Language: Burmese, English
Source/publisher: Myanmar Climate Change Watch
Format/size: html
Alternate URLs: http://www.tunlwin.com/index.php?english
Date of entry/update: 26 March 2011


Title: WWF - results of a local search for Myanmar
Description/subject: About 440 results (9 November 2017)
Language: English
Source/publisher: World Wildlife Fund (WWF)
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 09 November 2017


Individual Documents

Title: Watch New Video Documentary: Warmer Days. Myanmar in the Age of Climate Change
Date of publication: 08 December 2017
Description/subject: "How is Climate Change affecting Myanmar? What are ways to adapt to Climate Change? Watch and find the answers in the new MCCA documentary: ‘Warmer Days: Myanmar in the Age of Climate Change’. The video-documentary was produced by the Yangon Film School for MCCA and the Ministry of Natural Resources and Environmental Conservation with the unbending support of the European Union..."
Language: English,Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: Myanmar Climate Change Alliance
Format/size: Adobe Flash,or html5
Date of entry/update: 17 January 2018


Title: Climate Change and Private Sector Resilience in Myanmar
Date of publication: December 2017
Description/subject: "This policy brief looks into climate risks to three selected industries (agribusinesses, garment industries, building businesses) in order to illustrate potential impacts on and key vulnerabilities of businesses in Myanmar, dominated by small and medium enterprises. Businesses and industries in Myanmar are already facing enormous losses and damages associated with climate change. In future, climate change will likely cause huge production losses and physical damages to farmers, agro-processing firms, retailers and other agribusinesses. The garment industry will face unreliable electricity supply, disruptions in all transport modes, physical damages to assets, and declining health and well-being of migrant workers. Building industries and businesses will be challenged by more frequent disruption of operations, as well as losses associated with long-term consequences of climate change on supply of materials, health of workers, quality of construction works and market demand. • To enhance the resilience of businesses and industries, Myanmar should: enforce environmental laws, regulations and safety standards legislation; mainstream climate change considerations into sectoral policies, labour health and safety standards, and social protection programmes; and develop tailored information services, stimulate research, raise awareness, support capacity-building of businesses, and improve early warning systems. Public institutions should work with the private sector to safeguard a resilient future of the nation and communities, including by engaging private sector actors in adaptation planning and implementation, and promoting public-private partnerships..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Myanmar Climate Change Alliance
Format/size: pdf (516K)
Alternate URLs: http://myanmarccalliance.org/mcca/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/CC-and-Private-Sector-Resilience_onlin...
http://myanmarccalliance.org/en/2017/12/climate-change-and-private-sector-resilience-in-myanmar/
Date of entry/update: 17 January 2018


Title: From Plan to Action: Implementing climate change action in Myanmar: A milestone!
Date of publication: 30 October 2017
Description/subject: "On 26 and 27 October 2017 the MCCA with Ministry of Natural Resources and Environmental Conservation (MoNREC) conducted a very important workshop to mainstream climate change into sectoral action. It can be considered a milestone The Myanmar Climate Change Strategy and Action Plan 2016-2030 (to be adopted soon) includes six sectoral outcomes – or pillars – to be achieved through six Sectoral Action Plans on: 1) Food Security; 2) Healthy Eco-System, 3) Sustainable and Resilient Transport, Industry and Energy; 4) Resilient Cities; 5) Health and DRR; 6) Education and Science..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Myanmar Climate Change Alliance
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 18 January 2018


Title: Climate-smart agriculture, fisheries and livestock for food security - Policy Guidance Brief 1
Date of publication: October 2017
Description/subject: "The agriculture sector (including livestock and fisheries) constitutes about 28 per cent of Myanmar’s gross domestic product and 61 per cent of the total employment. Moreover, 70 per cent of Myanmar’s population still lives in rural areas and remains highly dependent on small-scale agriculture (crops, livestock, fishing). Rural poor suffer insufficient access to food and nutrition. Climate change has already challenged the agriculture sector in Myanmar by affecting rice yields and livestock production, while disasters such as floods and cyclones have caused massive destruction in rural areas..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Myanmar Climate Change Alliance
Format/size: pdf (760K)
Alternate URLs: http://myanmarccalliance.org/mcca/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/Brief-1_web.pdf
Date of entry/update: 17 January 2018


Title: Climate Change: A Permanent Reality for Myanmar
Date of publication: 04 September 2017
Description/subject: "Reshmi Banerjee gives an overview of climate change-related risks for Myanmar...According to the 2016 Climate Risk Index, Myanmar is the second most vulnerable country in the world to the effects of climate change. The intensity and regularity with which cyclones make landfall have increased with every year, with the delta region affected by tropical storms and the dry zone impacted by debilitating droughts. Researchers at the Centre for Climate System Research at Columbia University, in collaboration with the Department of Hydrology and Meteorology, have stated that the county could see a rise in temperature by 1.3 and 2.7 degrees by the middle of the century along with increase in precipitation by 2%-12% in 2011-40, 6%-27% by 2041-70. This is evident from the 2010 severe drought, a year which saw temperatures rise up to 47.2 degrees Celsius, a sure sign of global warming hitting the country hard. Dry seasons have become longer with shorter rainy seasons, thus inviting hardships for people in the form of water shortages and flooding respectively..."
Author/creator: Reshmi Banerjee
Language: English
Source/publisher: teacircleoxford
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 04 September 2017


Title: ASSESSING CLIMATE RISK IN MYANMAR: Technical report 2017
Date of publication: March 2017
Description/subject: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: "Myanmar’s climate is projected to shift dramatically in the coming decades, having a lasting and significant impact on Myanmar’s ecosystems and, in turn, on human health, agriculture, food security, infrastructure, local livelihoods and the larger economy. The climate risk information in this report, developed in collaboration with the Department of Meteorology (DMH) and in consultation with other key stakeholders, can aid adaptation and resilience planning across many sectors. This report presents climate risk information including observed climate and future projections of temperature, rainfall, sea level rise and various extreme events, and outlines how this information can be used in decision-making. It also describes how climate change will affect biodiversity and ecosystem services, coastal zones, health, agriculture, infrastructure, water resources and urban areas. Finally, it documents how climate risk information is being used by the Myanmar Climate Change Alliance (MCCA) to support local ecosystem-based adaptation planning in the delta and Dry Zone towns of Labutta and Pakkoku. It should be seen as a contribution to the broader work on climate change and official projections on temperature and precipitation being carried out by DMH and the Regional Integrated Multi-Hazard Early Warning System for Africa and Asia (RIMES) due to be released in the near future."
Author/creator: Radley Horton, Manishka De Mel, Danielle Peters, Corey Lesk, Ryan Bartlett, Hanna Helsingen, Daniel Bader, Pasquale Capizzi, Shaun Martin and Cynthia Rosenzweig
Language: English
Source/publisher: World Wildlife Fund, Department of Meteorology and Hydrology Ministry of Transport, UN Habitat, Myanmar Climate Change Alliance, Center for Climate Systems Research
Format/size: pdf (1.8MB-reduced version; 4.35MB-original)
Alternate URLs: http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs23/Final_Technical_Report_-_Assessing_Climate_Risk_in_Myanmar-red.p...
Date of entry/update: 11 April 2017


Title: CLIMATE CHANGE RISK PROFILE BURMA - Fact Sheet
Date of publication: January 2017
Description/subject: COUNTRY OVERVIEW "Burma, also called Myanmar, is a mountainous country in Southeast Asia with an extensive coastline and an estimated population of 51.4 million people. The country is inherently prone to extreme weather events, including floods, cyclones , tsunami s , heavy monsoon rains, flood s , storm surges and drought . For example, t he 2008 Cy clone Nargis resulted in 138,000 fatalities. Climate change increases the frequency and severity of extreme weather events and poses new threats from rising seas, food and water insecuri ty, and public health outbreaks. The majority of Burma’s population an d principal economic activities are concentrated in coastal and low - lying zones vulnerable to sea level rise and increased storm surge . For example, if sea level were to rise by a half meter, the shoreline of the Ayeyarwad d y Delta – the country’s main rice producer – would recede by 10 km . Burma’s economy, largely dependent on natural resources (mining, forestry, fishing) and rice production , would also be at risk from higher temperatures and increased precipitation variability . Afte r 50 years of military rule , Burma transitioned to a civilian government in 2011 and is at a historic stage in its development , pursuing p olitical and econo mic reforms. Climate change, compounded by high levels of poverty, high exposure to natural hazards , and low capacity to respond to those hazards , could undermine the country’s development efforts and economic progress if not addressed..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: USAID - Fact Sheet
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 04 May 2018


Title: Assessing Climate Risk in Myanmar: Summary for Policymakers and Planners
Date of publication: 2017
Description/subject: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: "This brief aims to help decision-makers across sectors in Myanmar incorporate climate change risks into planning and investment decisions by summarising key messages from a detailed technical analysis of climate change in Myanmar that is released alongside this report."
Author/creator: Radley Horton, Manishka De Mel, Danielle Peters, Corey Lesk, Ryan Bartlett, Hanna Helsingen, Daniel Bader, Pasquale Capizzi, Shaun Martin, and Cynthia Rosenzweig.
Language: English
Source/publisher: Center for Climate Systems Research at Columbia University, WWF-US and WWF-Myanmar, UN-Habitat Myanmar.
Format/size: pdf (8.3MB-reduced version; 20MB-original)
Alternate URLs: https://reliefweb.int/sites/reliefweb.int/files/resources/climate_risk_assessment_summary_eng.pdf
Date of entry/update: 08 November 2017


Title: Myanmar ready for climate change?
Date of publication: 11 November 2016
Description/subject: "...According to the 2016 Climate Risk Index, Myanmar is the second-most-vulnerable country in the world to the effects of climate change. Joern Kristensen, director of the Myanmar Institute for Integrated Development (MIID), has experienced firsthand how new weather patterns are putting farmers under stress. His organisation runs a climate adaptation project in the highland areas of Nyaungshwe and Kalaw in Shan State. “What we can see there is, while precipitation has been more or less the same for the past 20 years, the rainy season has become shorter. Which means you have more rain over a shorter time and, subsequently, more flooding,” he said..."
Author/creator: Samuel Schlaefli
Language: English
Source/publisher: "Myanmar Times"
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 09 December 2017


Title: Energy and climate: A turning point looms
Date of publication: 06 August 2016
Description/subject: "...Second-guessing global policy over the next few years while trying to figure out the best way to adapt new infrastructure may in any case be something of a fool’s errand. Instead, planners and investors could reduce risk, as well as reducing social impacts, through design, by fundamentally rethinking electricity systems around the technological and environmental conditions of the 21st century. It is a golden opportunity for Myanmar, where so much electricity infrastructure is yet to be built. This is seemingly recognised in the National League for Democracy’s 2015 election manifesto. Technologies and principles are already well understood and being applied in rich and poor countries worldwide. Energy efficiency, batteries, solar modules and wind turbines are less vulnerable to climate change impacts and policy than conventional alternatives. Costs for renewable-energy technologies are falling fast. Meanwhile, the avoided health and environmental impacts will ensure people in Myanmar are better off with renewables. The key to luring investment is clear long-term policy. Get that right soon and whether or not a moratorium comes to pass Myanmar will be on the way to climate-resilient, accessible and affordable electricity."
Language: English
Source/publisher: "Frontier Myanmar"
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 09 August 2016


Title: Impact of Climate Change and the Case of Myanmar
Date of publication: August 2015
Description/subject: "In Myanmar, the observed evidence of change over the last 60 years includes a nationwide increase in temperature of on average around 0.08°C per decade and an increase in total rainfall (29-215 millimetres per decade). Importantly, changes in the duration of the monsoon season have been observed as well as the recurrence and severity of extreme weather events (NAPA 2012)..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Myanmar Climate Change Alliance
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 11 May 2018


Title: Burma one of countries most affected by climate change
Date of publication: 15 June 2015
Description/subject: "Burma has been ranked by a German think tank as the second worst country with regards to the effects of climate change between 1994 and 2013. The Global Climate Risk Index 2015, published by Germanwatch, listed Honduras as the country suffering most from the effects of extreme weather events in the 20-year period. Burma’s neighbours Bangladesh, Vietnam and Thailand were ranked as fourth, sixth and ninth worst affected, respectively. Burmese weather expert Tun Lwin said, “The index is based on not only the cost of life and property loss in natural disasters, but also on the [country’s] level of risk of natural disasters [occurring] as result of climate change and how well prepared this country is to deal with the disaster.”..."
Author/creator: TUN TUN THEIN
Language: English
Source/publisher: Democratic Voice of Burma (DVB)
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 16 June 2015


Title: Myanmar is one of the most vulnerable countries in the world
Date of publication: 2014
Description/subject: "Myanmar is highly vulnerable to climate change: according to some studies, even to the point as 2nd most vulnerable country in the world, in terms of vulnerability from extreme weather events related to climate change, in the 1991-2013 period, as in the latest updates in the Global Risk Index confirm the country ranks in second place (Check the document here). This is a serious threat to Myanmar’s sustainable development. Myanmar is committed to reduce its vulnerability and to play its role in the global community to combat climate change. Myanmar’s wealth, economy, and society are defined by and highly dependent on its environment, natural resources, climatic conditions and the health of its eco-system. Also, because of its geographic location and geo-morphology, Myanmar is regularly exposed to a series of natural events with potentially negative impacts. These events may be exacerbated by the changing climate, which can also have an effect on, for instance, seasons and rain patterns, and consequently on agriculture, the availability and quality of the water resources, the bio-diversity or the eco-system as a whole..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Myanmar Climate Change Alliance
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 11 May 2018


Title: Emissions Reduction Profile: Myanmar
Date of publication: June 2013
Description/subject: Economy, Growth and Emissions: "Burma, officially the Union of Myanmar, is the second largest country by geographical area in Southeast Asia. Burma's diverse population has played a major role in defining its politics, history, and demographics in modern times. The military has dominated government since General Ne Win led a coup in 1962 that toppled the civilian government of U Nu. Burma remains under the tight control of the military-led State Peace and Development Council. Burma is a resource-rich country. During World War II, the British destroyed the major oil wells, and mines for tungsten, tin, lead and silver to keep them from the Japanese. Under British administration, Burma was the second wealthiest country in Southeast Asia. It was the world's largest exporter of rice, and also had a wealth of natural and labour resources. It produced 75% of the world's teak, and had a highly literate population. However, since the reformations of 1962, the Burmese economy has become one of the least developed in the world--suffering from decades of stagnation, mismanagement and isolation. Now, the lack of an educated workforce contributes to the growing problems of the economy. Burma lacks adequate infrastructure. Energy shortages are common throughout the country, including in Yangon. Railways are old and rudimentary, with few repairs since their construction in the late 19th century. Highways are typically unpaved, except in the major cities. Burma’s GDP stands at $42.953 billion and now grows at an average rate of 2.9% annually.TheEU, United States and Canada, among others, have imposed economic sanctions on Burma. Burma is among the least emitting countries in the world, with 0.3 tCO2e per capita per year, and total annual GHG emissions of 12 million tCO2--excluding any methane emissions from agriculture, which has not been estimated (World Bank). In the WRI assessment, however, Myanmar has been attributed annual GHG emissions of 265 million tCO2e/year2, including all greenhouse gasses. This indicated significant emissions from agriculture. The growth in economy and emissions can be seen in the graphs below."
Language: English
Source/publisher: UNEP RISØ
Format/size: pdf (1M)
Date of entry/update: 12 June 2014


Title: Burma’s Global Warming Activists Turn Up the Heat on Govt
Date of publication: 06 May 2013
Description/subject: "RANGOON—As a water shortage hits several townships in Burma’s commercial capital and farmers nationwide anxiously await the upcoming rainy season, environmentalists are calling for more government support in the fight against climate change in this country of 60 million people. While Burma’s nominally civilian government has earned international praise for its program of political and economic reforms after decades of military rule, environmentalists say climate change is a pressing issue that has been pushed to the back burner for too long by the nation’s leaders. “The new government is trying to solve poverty and civil war, but unfortunately climate change has never been well acknowledged by our decision-makers,” meteorologist Dr. Tun Lwin said on Saturday in Rangoon at roundtable discussion about global warming in Burma, as temperatures in the country’s biggest city soared to 38 degrees Celsius..."
Author/creator: Kyaw Phyo Tha
Language: English
Source/publisher: "The Irrawaddy"
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 06 May 2013


Title: Global Climate Risk Index 2013
Date of publication: November 2012
Description/subject: Summary: "The Global Climate Risk Index 2013 analyses to what extent countries have been affected by the impacts of weather-related loss events (storms, floods, heat waves etc.). The most recent available data from 2011 as well as for the period 1992-2011 were taken into ac- count. Most affected countries in 2011 were Thailand, Cambodia, Pakistan, El Salvador and the Philippines. For the period 1992 to 2011, Honduras, Myanmar and Nicaragua rank highest. This year's 8th edition of the an alysis reconfirms that less developed countries are generally more affected than industrialis ed countries, according to the Climate Risk Index. With re- gard to future climate change, the Climate Ri sk Index can serve as a warning signal indicat- ing past vulnerability which may further increase in regions where extreme events will be- come more frequent or more severe through climate change. While some vulnerable devel- oping countries are frequently hit by extreme ev ents, there are also some where such disas- ters are a rarity..."
Author/creator: Sven Harmeling and David Eckstein
Language: English
Source/publisher: Germanwatch
Format/size: pdf (570K)
Date of entry/update: 07 May 2013


Title: The Man Who Foresees Storms
Date of publication: 28 March 2011
Description/subject: "An apocalyptic series of earthquakes, cyclones, tsunamis and floods in the region has spooked everyone. Many people have turned to soothsayers and astrologers for advice about any impending natural disasters. But rather than consult the Mayan calender or a fortune-teller, The Irrawaddy reporter Min Naing Thu interviewed Dr Tun Lwin, the former director-general of Burma's Department of Meteorology and Hydrology (DMH). Since his resignation from the DMH in 2009, Tun Lwin has served as a technical adviser to the Regional Integrated Multi-hazard Early Warning System (RIMES) at the Asian Institute of Technology in Thailand. He also served as a consultant to the Myanmar Red Cross Society, CARE Myanmar, Action Aid Myanmar and Myanmar Egress's Network Activities Group. He has also been involved with the International Centre for Water Hazard and Risk Management (ICHARM), Myanmar Egress, World Vision Myanmar, Global Green and other organizations, focusing primarily on climate change and how to minimize damage caused by natural disasters. Tun Lwin posts many of his articles concerning meteorological issues on his website, Myanmar Climate Change Watch..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: "The Irrawaddy"
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 28 March 2011


Title: COUNTRY REPORT ON SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN MYANMAR
Date of publication: 2011
Description/subject: INTRODUCTION: Myanmar Overview; Resources...SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK: National Plans; National Organisations...POLICY INSTRUMENTS IN MYANMAR: Overview of Policy Instruments; Policies and Initiatives; Building Rating System...BEST PRACTICE...APPENDIX 1: WEBSITE LINKS OF THE KEY NATIONAL PLANS AND ORGANISATIONS IN MYANMAR.., APPENDIX 2: WEBSITE LINKS OF THE KEY SUSTAINABLE BUILDING POLICIES AND INITIATIVES UNDER THE FOUR CATEGORIES IN MYANMAR
Language: English
Source/publisher: United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)
Format/size: http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs18/Energy%20efficiency%202011%20study%20UNEP.pdf
Date of entry/update: 09 June 2014


Title: Burma taking severe hit from climate change: watchdog
Date of publication: 09 December 2009
Description/subject: Burma is one of the countries worst affected by extreme weather resulting from climate change, according to a new report that assesses the impact of global warming over a period of nearly two decades. Published by the Berlin-based climate watchdog Germanwatch on Tuesday, the report, the Global Climate Risk Index, says that Bangladesh, Burma and Honduras were the countries most affected by extreme weather events from 1990 to 2008. The report was launched in the Danish capital of Copenhagen, where the United Nations Climate Change Conference is underway.
Author/creator: Wai Moe
Language: English
Source/publisher: The Irrawaddy
Format/size: html
Alternate URLs: http://www2.irrawaddy.org/print_article.php?art_id=17376
Date of entry/update: 21 September 2010