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Home > Main Library > Human Rights > Discrimination > Race or Ethnicity: Discrimination based on > Racial or ethnic discrimination in Burma: reports of violations > Racial or ethnic discrimination in Burma: reports of violations against several groups

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Racial or ethnic discrimination in Burma: reports of violations against several groups

Websites/Multiple Documents

Title: Human Rights Watch Burma page
Description/subject: Full text online reports from 1989 (events of 1988), though 1991 seems to be missing and 2004 has no section on Burma.
Language: English
Source/publisher: Human Rights Watch
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre (IDMC) - Myanmar page
Description/subject: Highly recommended. Well-organised site. In "list of sources used" are most of the main reports from 1995 bearing on IDPs (though the reports from 1995 to 1997 are missing - temporarily, one hopes) and more Burma pages updated June 2001. Go to the home page for links on IDPs, including the Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement.
Language: English
Source/publisher: IDMC
Format/size: html
Alternate URLs: http://www.internal-displacement.org/search?q=myanmar
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: Karen Human Rights Group (KHRG)
Description/subject: The largest body of high-quality reports on the civil war in Burma, especially focussed on the civilian victims - currently over 600 reports dating from 1992.
Language: English, Karen, Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: Karen Human Rights Group (KHRG)
Format/size: html, pdf
Alternate URLs: http://www.khrg.org/reports/karenlanguage/index.php
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: Karen Human Rights Group - photo & video
Description/subject: Several thousand photographs from 1993 covering different ethnic groups as well as a smaller number of videos.
Language: English
Source/publisher: Karen Human Rights Group (KHRG)
Format/size: html, jpeg
Date of entry/update: 24 November 2010


Title: Minorities at Risk Project
Description/subject: May be useful, but it needs SPSS to work with the database
Language: English
Alternate URLs: http://www.cidcm.umd.edu/projects/project.asp?id=17
Date of entry/update: 24 November 2010


Title: US Committee for Refugees
Language: English
Source/publisher: US Committee for Refugees (USCR)
Format/size: html
Alternate URLs: http://uscri.refugees.org/site/News2?page=NewsArticle&id=5119&security=1422&news_iv_ctr...
Date of entry/update: 24 November 2010


Individual Documents

Title: State of the World's Minorities and Indigenous Peoples 2013 (Burma/Myanmar section)
Date of publication: 24 September 2013
Description/subject: "State of the World’s Minorities and Indigenous Peoples 2013" presents a global picture of the health inequalities experienced by minorities and indigenous communities. The report finds that minorities and indigenous peoples suffer more ill-health and receive poorer quality of care. - See more at: http://www.minorityrights.org/12071/state-of-the-worlds-minorities/state-of-the-worlds-minorities-and-indigenous-peoples-2013.html#sthash.4jaxgXrf.dpuf
Language: English
Source/publisher: Minority Rights Group (MRG)
Format/size: pdf (153K)
Alternate URLs: http://www.minorityrights.org/12071/state-of-the-worlds-minorities/state-of-the-worlds-minorities-a...
Date of entry/update: 03 October 2013


Title: Ethnische Minderheiten im Würgegriff
Date of publication: 01 May 2008
Description/subject: Die ethnischen Minderheiten stellen rund 30 Prozent der 50 Millionen Bewohner Burmas. Sie leben überwiegend in den Bergregionen an den Grenzen zu den Nachbarländern. Seit 1948 ringen sie um mehr Selbstverwaltung und Menschenrechte. Während sich die internationale Gemeinschaft nun für die Freilassung der bei der Niederschlagung der Proteste in Rangun Festgenommenen einsetzt, nimmt kaum jemand wahr, dass in den Minderheitengebieten seit Jahren schwerste Menschenrechtsverletzungen andauern; Menschenrechtsverletzungen vor und nach 2007; Chin; Karen; Biosprit; Human rights violations before and after 2007; natural ressources, bio-fuels
Author/creator: Ulrich Delius
Language: German, Deutsch
Source/publisher: Gesellschaft für bedrohte Völker
Date of entry/update: 03 May 2008


Title: Unterdrückung durch die Militärjunta
Date of publication: January 2007
Description/subject: Mindestens 82 000 Angehörige von Minderheiten flohen in 2005 vor den schrecklichen Menschen-rechtsverletzungen in Burma. In Thailand sind mehr als 150 000 burmesische Flüchtlinge registriert, wobei sich dort Schätzungen zufolge mindestens 1,5 Millionen illegal aufhalten. Allein die Zahl Hilfe suchender Karen-Flüchtlinge ist um fast 60 Prozent auf 900 Neuankömmlinge pro Monat gestiegen. Zwei Drittel dieser Flüchtlinge sind Kinder. In Burma selbst leben nach offiziellen Angaben 500 000 Binnenflüchtlinge; die tatsächliche Zahl dürfte in Millionenhöhe liegen. Salween; Staudämme; Salween-River; dams
Author/creator: Anna Bucur
Language: German, Deutsch
Date of entry/update: 03 May 2008


Title: MYANMAR: LEAVING HOME
Date of publication: 08 September 2005
Description/subject: "...Amnesty International is concerned about a variety of human rights which are systematically denied to civilians by the Myanmar government, particularly those belonging to ethnic minorities. The routine military interference with the exercise of human rights includes forced labour; forcible relocation; extortion of food, money and other personal possessions; house destruction; and the denial of freedom of movement. During May and June 2004, Amnesty International interviewed 115 migrant workers in seven locations in Thailand who were either working or searching for work. They were members of the Mon, Kayin, Kayah, Shan, Rawang, Tavoyan and Bama ethnic groups, and followed the Buddhist, Muslim, or Christian faiths. They were employed mostly in the fishing, manufacturing, agricultural, construction, and domestic service industries. The interviews were conducted confidentially with the assistance of an independent Bama – English interpreter. Both the men and women who were interviewed were predominantly from rural areas, although some were from urban centres, including small towns, State and Division capitals, and Yangon. In the last decade hundreds of thousands of workers from Myanmar have migrated to neighbouring Thailand in search of jobs and other economic opportunities. Migrants interviewed by Amnesty International had left their homes in Myanmar for a variety of reasons, including the inability to find a job; confiscation of their houses and land by the military; and fear that if they remained they would be subjected to human rights violations, including forced labour. Many of the young people who were interviewed had come to work in Thailand in order to send money back to their families. However some of them could not save enough to send any money home, but were working in Thailand so as not to be a burden to their parents. Those who had fled from militarized areas in Myanmar were much more likely to have had direct experience of human rights violations at the hands of the Myanmar military. In some areas the vast majority of young people have left their villages in order to work in Thailand. One Mon man from Hpa’an township, Kayin State, told Amnesty International about the situation in his village: "Many people have been in Thailand for the last 15 years, and many more are leaving now. Prices are going up, the population is growing, people are having a hard time feeding themselves and have decided to leave."..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Amnesty International
Format/size: html
Alternate URLs: http://www.amnesty.org/en/library/asset/ASA16/023/2005/en/3ea6422f-d4c2-11dd-8a23-d58a49c0d652/asa1...
http://www.amnesty.org/en/library/asset/ASA16/023/2005/en/3b13cc29-d4c2-11dd-8a23-d58a49c0d652/asa1...
http://www.amnesty.org/en/library/info/ASA16/023/2005
Date of entry/update: 19 November 2010


Title: Burma's Dirty War - The humanitarian crisis in eastern Burma
Date of publication: 24 May 2004
Description/subject: "Up to a million people have fled their homes in eastern Burma in a crisis the world has largely ignored. Burma's refusal to release Aung San Suu Kyi from house arrest, and the boycotting of the constitutional convention this month by the main opposition, has thrust Burma into the spotlight again. But unseen and largely unremarked is the ongoing harrowing experience of hundreds of thousands of people in eastern Burma, hiding in the jungle or trapped in army-controlled relocation sites. Others are in refugee camps on the Thai-Burmese border. These people are victims in a counterinsurgency war in which they are the deliberate targets. As members of Burma's ethnic minorities - which make up 40 per cent of the population - they are trapped in a conflict between the Burmese army and ethnic minority armies. Surviving on caches of rice hidden in caves, or on roots and wild foods, families in eastern Burma face malaria, landmines, disease and starvation. They are hunted like animals by army patrols and starved into surrender. In interviews... refugees told Christian Aid of murder and rape, the torching of villages and shooting of family members as they lay huddled together in the fields. They recalled farmers who had been blown up by landmines laid by the army around their crops. This report, based on personal testimonies from refugees, tells the story of Burma's humanitarian crisis. On the brink of the Burmese government's announcement of a 'roadmap to democracy' for a new constitution, Burma's Dirty War argues that any new political settlement must include the crisis on the country's eastern borders. Burma's refusal to free Aung San Suu Kyi promises more intransigence and an even slower pace of change - with predictable human costs. This report calls on the UK and Irish governments, the EU and the UN to use what opportunity remains from the roadmap to democracy to press for an end to the conflict in negotiations with ethnic minorities. It also argues that the UN must gain access to the areas in crisis - despite the Burmese government ban on travel there by humanitarian agencies. Key recommendations include: * that the Burmese government cease human rights abuses, allow access to eastern Burma by humanitarian agencies including UN special representatives, and engage in dialogue with ethnic minority representatives * that the UK and Irish governments, the EU and the UN fund work with displaced people inside Burma and continue to support refugees in Thailand * that the UK and Irish governments, the EU and UN Security Council condemn Burma's human rights abuses against ethnic minorities, demand that it protect civilians from violence and insist that Burma allow access to humanitarian agencies The report argues that governments must seize the opportunity presented by the roadmap to push for genuine negotiations between the government, the National League for Democracy and ethnic minority organisations which can bring out a just and lasting peace..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Christian Aid
Format/size: pdf (760K)
Date of entry/update: 24 November 2010


Title: Burma Human Rights Yearbook 2002-03: Rights of Ethnic Minorities
Date of publication: October 2003
Description/subject: "Throughout its entire existence as an independent state Burma has experienced a complex set of conflicts between the central government and ethnic minority groups. More than half a century of civil war has caused immense suffering and devastation for Burma and its people. A series of ceasefires between the SPDC and armed ethnic opposition groups since the late 1980s have brought relief in some areas but no real solutions and fighting continues. The government’s determination to preserve a unified state remains the main justification for military rule, and armed conflict is a root cause of ongoing human rights abuses and a deepening humanitarian crisis in ethnic minority areas..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Human Rights Documentation Unit of the NCGUB
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 10 November 2003


Title: Burma Human Rights Yearbook 2001-2002: Rights of Ethnic Minorities
Date of publication: September 2002
Description/subject: "...Ethnic minorities, which make up more than one-third of the population of Burma, have long struggled for political rights and greater independence from the Rangoon government as a reaction to political isolation and oppression. As a result, the military junta has implemented a divide and rule policy in which divisions between and within ethnic groups are developed and encouraged and majority Burman troops in ethnic minority areas oppress the general population. Throughout the year, Burmese soldiers were responsible for a large number of documented abuses against minority peoples including killings, beatings, and rapes..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Human Rights Documentation Unit, NCGUB
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: Burma/Myanmar: Time for Change
Date of publication: 17 July 2002
Description/subject: "This timely report gives an overview of the major minority ethnic groups and their situation and prospects within Burma today. Major human rights issues are also discussed: extra-judicial killings, displacement of populations, forced labour, illegal use of landmines and child soldiers. The author considers the position of women, restrictions on freedom of expression and the challenges posed by HIV/AIDS and the trade in narcotics."
Author/creator: Martin Smith
Language: English
Source/publisher: Minority Rights Group
Format/size: PDF (640K) 48 pages
Date of entry/update: 24 November 2010


Title: A strategy of subjugation: The Situation in Ler Mu Lah Township, Tenasserim Division
Date of publication: 21 December 2001
Description/subject: "This report aims to provide an update on the situation in Tenasserim Division, Burma’s southernmost region. It is based primarily on interviews from Ler Mu Lah township in central Tenasserim Division, but also gives an overview of some background and developments in other parts of the Division. At the end of the report two maps are included: Map 1 showing the entire Division, and Map 2 showing the northern part of Tenasserim Division and the southern part of Karen State’s Dooplaya District. Many of the villages mentioned in the report and the interviews can be found on Map 1, while Map 2 includes some of the sites mentioned in relation to flows of refugees and their forced repatriation..." An update on the situation in central Tenasserim Division since the Burmese junta's mass offensive to capture the area in 1997. Unable to gain complete control of the region because of the rugged jungle, harassment by resistance forces and the staunch non-cooperation of the villagers, the SPDC regime has gradually flooded the area with 36 Battalions which have forced many villages into relocation sites where the villagers are used as forced labour to push more military roads into remote areas. Thousands continue to hide in the forests despite being hunted and having their food supplies destroyed by SPDC patrols. They have little choice, though, because if they flee to the Thai border they encounter the Thai Army 9th Division, which continues to force refugees back into Burma at gunpoint." Additional keywords: Tanintharyi, Burman, Mon, Karen, Tayoyan, road building, free-fire zones, destruction of villages, resistance groups, extortions, internal displacement, refoulement, forced repatriation, killing, torture, shooting, restrictions on movement, beating to death, shortage of food, 9th Division (Thai Army). ADDITIONAL KEYWORDS: forced resettlement, forced relocation, forced movement, forced displacement, forced migration, forced to move.
Language: English
Source/publisher: Karen Human Rights Group Regional & Thematic Reports (KHRG #2001-04)
Format/size: html, pdf (1.2 MB)
Alternate URLs: http://www.khrg.org/khrg2001/khrg0104.pdf
http://www.khrg.org/khrg2001/khrg0104.html
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: Burma Human Rights Yearbook 2000: Rights of Ethnic Minorities
Date of publication: October 2001
Description/subject: "...Burma is a country rich in ethnic diversity. Yet although the SPDC attempts to promote this diversity, and the existence of its 135 "national races" (SPDC term for the countrys ethnic minority groups), the rights of ethnic minority people remain in violation...n areas where cease-fire agreements have been reached, human rights abuses continue to take place. In fact, in these "national reconciliation" areas human rights abuses have increased rather than abated. There has been no move on the part of the SPDC to engage in political discussions with opposition groups to reinforce the military cease-fire agreements. Under the terms of the cease-fire, some ethnic groups have been allowed to keep their arms and soldiers, however, SPDC had vastly increased the number of its soldiers in those areas... The continuing armed conflicts in the Karen, Karenni, Shan and Chin States have been accompanied by massive human rights violations..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Human Rights Documentation Unit, NCGUB
Format/size: html
Alternate URLs: Main page of Yearbook: http://www.ibiblio.org/obl/docs/yearbooks/Main.htm
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: Valued Less Than A Milk Tin
Date of publication: August 2001
Description/subject: "When you speak another language, that is Burmese, you become Burman instead of Karen. When this happens you're already dead as a Karen person." "When they are portering, many Shan don't understand what the soldiers are ordering them to do, and so they may make mistakes and get beaten and tortured by the soldiers." On the eve of the World Conference Against Racism in South Africa, EarthRights International released this report, which documents a widespread pattern of brutal discrimination against ethnic minorities in Burma. The report was researched by EarthRights International staff who interviewed mainly Karen and Shan victims of government-sponsored discrimination, including forced labor, rape, destruction of identities and suppression of language. The report documents state-sponsored discrimination against minorities in schools and government institutions, discriminatory violence in conflict zones, and a pattern of targeting minorities for the worst abuses of forced labor..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: EarthRights International
Format/size: PDF (1840K)
Alternate URLs: http://www.earthrights.org/sites/default/files/publications/valued-less-than-a-milk-tin.pdf
Date of entry/update: 24 November 2010


Title: Myanmar: Torture of Ethnic Minority Women
Date of publication: 17 July 2001
Description/subject: Torture and other forms of cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment of men, women and children, both in ethnic minority areas and in central Myanmar, has taken place for decades. This report examines the torture and ill-treatment of women from ethnic minorities in particular by the tatmadaw (armed forces). Ethnic minorities, who make up a third of the country's population, mainly live in seven states in the country . . . Amnesty International has documented serious human rights violations by the tatmadaw: extra-judicial executions, "disappearances," torture and cruel treatment of ethnic minority civilians, including the rape and sexual abuse of women. Torture in ethnic minority areas generally takes place in the context of forced labour and portering; forced relocation, and in detention at army camps, military intelligence centres, in people's homes, fields and villages. Many individuals have died as a result of torture or been killed after being tortured. Force and the threat of force is regularly used to compel members of ethnic minorities to comply with military directives - which may range from orders for villages to relocate; to provide unpaid labourers to military forces; to not harvesting their crops. Torture, including rape, is particularly widespread in those states where armed resistance continues and the army is engaged in counter-insurgency operations against armed groups. ... ADDITIONAL KEYWORDS: forced resettlement, forced relocation, forced movement, forced displacement, forced migration, forced to move, displaced
Language: English,French
Source/publisher: Amnesty International
Format/size: html, pdf
Alternate URLs: http://www.amnesty.org/en/library/asset/ASA16/017/2001/en/ae5a6480-d90b-11dd-ad8c-f3d4445c118e/asa1...
http://www.amnesty.org/en/library/asset/ASA16/017/2001/en/ba1e04f0-d90b-11dd-ad8c-f3d4445c118e/asa1... (French)
http://www.amnesty.org/en/library/info/ASA16/017/2001/en
Date of entry/update: 19 November 2010


Title: Myanmar: Ethnic Minorities: Targets of Repression
Date of publication: 13 June 2001
Description/subject: Myanmar's ethnic minorities, comprising one third of the population, continue to suffer disproportionately from a wide variety of human rights violations compared to the majority Burman people. This is particularly true of minorities living in areas where ethnically-based armed opposition groups are fighting against the tatmadaw, or Myanmar army. These groups live primarily in the Tanintharyi Division and in the Shan, Mon, Kayah and Kayin States in the east of the country. The army maintains an increasingly large presence in these areas, particularly in the so-called "black" or "grey" zones where armed opposition groups are active. As troops move through the countryside they pass through farming villages searching for insurgents and seeking intelligence about their movements from the farmers. While on patrol troops steal villagers' livestock, rice, money, and personal possessions, seize them for forced labour duty, and sometimes torture or even kill them for imputed links with the armed opposition.These human rights violations have been occurring for decades, and in spite of some recent positive developments in Myanmar, continue to be perpetrated by the tatmadaw." KEYWORDS: ETHNIC GROUPS / DISPLACED PEOPLE / ARMED CONFLICT / EXTRAJUDICIAL EXECUTION / FORCED LABOUR / TORTURE/ILL-TREATMENT / HARASSMENT / FARMERS / RACIAL DISCRIMINATION / REFUGEES / NON-GOVERNMENTAL ENTITIES / MILITARY
Language: English
Source/publisher: Amnesty International
Format/size: html, pdf (9.8 KB)
Alternate URLs: http://www.amnesty.org/en/library/asset/ASA16/014/2001/en/9240d97e-d92a-11dd-ad8c-f3d4445c118e/asa1...
http://www.amnesty.org/en/library/asset/ASA16/015/2001/en/7b0ffc39-d927-11dd-ad8c-f3d4445c118e/asa1...
http://www.amnesty.org/en/library/info/ASA16/014/2001/en
Date of entry/update: 26 July 2010


Title: Papun and Nyaunglebin Districts: Internally displaced villagers cornered by 40 SPDC Battalions; Food shortages, disease, killings and life on the run.
Date of publication: 09 April 2001
Description/subject: Food shortages, disease, killings and life on the run.Based on new interviews and reports from KHRG field researchers, this update summarises the increasingly desperate situation for villagers in these two districts. In the hills, the people of several hundred villages are still in hiding, their villages destroyed by SPDC troops. Their survival situation is now desperate as 40 SPDC Battalions continue to systematically destroy their rice supplies and crops and landmine their fields, and shoot them on sight. In the villages under SPDC control, people suffer under an impossible burden of many kinds of forced labour and extortion.
Language: English
Source/publisher: Karen Human Rights Group (KHRG (Information Update #2001-U3)
Alternate URLs: http://www.khrg.org/khrg2001/khrg01u3.html
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: A Village on Fire: the Destruction of Rural Life in Southeastern Burma
Date of publication: 31 October 2000
Description/subject: "...Under military control, rural Burma's subsistence farming village is losing its viability as the basic unit of society. Internally displaced people are usually thought to have fled military battles in and around their villages, but this paradigm doesn't apply to Burma. In the thousands of interviews conducted by the Karen Human Rights Group with villagers who have fled their homes, approximately 95 percent say they have not fled military battles, but rather the systematic destruction of their ability to survive, caused by demands and retaliations inflicted on them by the SPDC military. Where there is fighting, it is fluid and sporadic, and most villagers can avoid it by hiding for short periods in the forest. Once the SPDC occupies the area around their village, however, the suffering is inescapable. Villages, rooted to the land, are defenseless and vulnerable, and villages can be burned -- destroying rural life in southeastern Burma. "
Author/creator: Kevin Heppner
Language: English
Source/publisher: "Cultural Survival Quarterly" Issue 24.3
Format/size: html
Alternate URLs: http://www.culturalsurvival.org/ourpublications/csq/article/a-village-fire-the-destruction-rural-li...'>http://www.culturalsurvival.org/ourpublications/csq/article/a-village-fire-the-destruction-rural-li...
http://www.culturalsurvival.org/ourpublications/csq/article/a-village-fire-the-destruction-rural-li...'>http://www.culturalsurvival.org/ourpublications/csq/article/a-village-fire-the-destruction-rural-li...
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: Burma: One of the World's Landmine "Black Spots"
Date of publication: October 2000
Description/subject: Stephen Goose, co-founder of Nobel Peace Prize-winning International Campaign to Ban Landmines, is one of the world's foremost authorities on the use of anti-personnel landmines. In this exclusive interview with The Irrawaddy, he describes the situation inside Burma, where, he says, there are an estimated 1,500 landmine casualties each year.
Author/creator: Stephen Goose
Language: English
Source/publisher: "The Irrawaddy", Vol. 8. No. 10
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: Burma Human Rights Yearbook 1999-2000: 08 - Extrajudicial Killing, Summary or Arbitrary Execution - table
Date of publication: August 2000
Description/subject: Table of people killed in Nyaunglebin District, Karen State (Pegu Division) by the Sathonlone (SSS) troops in 1999.
Language: English
Source/publisher: Human Rights Documentation Unit of the NCGUB
Format/size: pdf (7K)
Date of entry/update: 23 November 2003


Title: Burma Human Rights Yearbook 1999-2000: 14 - Rights of Minorities
Date of publication: August 2000
Language: English
Source/publisher: Human Rights Documentation Unit of the NCGUB
Format/size: pdf (16K)
Date of entry/update: 23 November 2003


Title: Burma Human Rights Yearbook 1999-2000: 15 - Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman, Degrading, Treatment or Punishment
Date of publication: August 2000
Language: English
Source/publisher: Human Rights Documentation Unit of the NCGUB
Format/size: pdf (39K)
Date of entry/update: 23 November 2003


Title: Unsung Heroines: the Women of Myanmar
Date of publication: 24 May 2000
Description/subject: Women in Myanmar have been subjected to a wide range of human rights violations, including political imprisonment, torture and rape, forced labour, and forcible relocation, all at the hands of the military authorities. At the same time women have played an active role in the political and economic life of the country. It is the women who manage the family finances and work alongside their male relatives on family farms and in small businesses. Women have been at the forefront of the pro-democracy movement which began in 1988, many of whom were also students or female leaders within opposition political parties. Burman and non-Burman women. List of women in prison.ADDITIONAL KEYWORDS: forced resettlement, forced relocation, forced movement, forced displacement, forced migration, forced to move, displaced
Language: English
Source/publisher: Amnesty International USA (ASA 16/04/00)
Format/size: html
Alternate URLs: http://www.amnesty.org/en/library/asset/ASA16/004/2000/en/e158503a-df28-11dd-a3b7-b978e1cb2058/asa1...
http://www.amnestyusa.org/document.php?lang=e&id=EA7452D0C7C763F9802568E80064E12E
http://www.amnesty.org/en/library/asset/ASA16/004/2000/en/e8ec29a6-df28-11dd-a3b7-b978e1cb2058/asa1... (Spanish)
http://www.amnesty.org/en/library/asset/ASA16/004/2000/en/ed205dae-df28-11dd-a3b7-b978e1cb2058/asa1... (French)
Date of entry/update: 25 November 2010


Title: Voice of the Hungry Nation
Date of publication: October 1999
Description/subject: This document presents the findings, conclusions and recommendations of the People's Tribunal on Food Scarcity and Militarization in Burma. The Tribunal’s work will appeal to all readers interested in human rights and social justice, as well as anyone with a particular interest in Burma. The Asian Human Rights Commission presents this report in order to stimulate discourse on human rights and democratization in Burma and around the world.
Language: English
Source/publisher: People's Tribunal on Food Scarcity and Militarization in Burma
Format/size: English version
Alternate URLs: http://www.burmadebate.org/archives/fall99bttm.html#hungry
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: Voice of the Hungry Nation
Date of publication: September 1999
Description/subject: an edited version of a report by the People's Tribunal on Food Scarcity and Militarization in Burma, which was published by the Asian Human Rights Commission (AHRC) in October 1999.
Author/creator: People
Language: English
Source/publisher: "Burma Debate", Vol. VI, No. 3
Format/size: html
Alternate URLs: http://www.burmadebate.org/archives/fall99bttm.html#hungry
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: Voice of the Hungry Nation
Date of publication: 1999
Description/subject: Burmese version
Language: Burmese
Source/publisher: People's Tribunal on Food Scarcity and Militarization in Burma
Format/size: html
Alternate URLs: http://www.burmaguide.net/res-en/BIG19_41_en/BIG_resource_view?b_start:int=30&-C=
http://www.google.co.th/url?sa=t&source=web&cd=1&ved=0CBQQFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ahrchk.net%2Fpu...
http://www.foodjustice.net/burma/1996-2000tribunal/burmese/index.htm
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: Forced Labour in Myanmar (Burma)
Date of publication: 02 July 1998
Description/subject: "Report of the Commission of Inquiry appointed under article 26 of the Constitution of the International Labour Organization to examine the observance by Myanmar of the Forced Labour Convention, 1930 (No. 29)"...Full Text (about 400 pages) The central ILO report on forced labour in Burma. Appendix III contains 246 interviews, largely with people from non-Burman ethnic groups - Chin, Rohingya, Arakanese, Karen, Karenni, Shan, Pa-O, Mon. The interviews cover forced labour, but also many other violations of human rights such as killings (executions), rape, torture, looting, forced relocation (forced displacement) violence against women, violence against children, looting. ADDITIONAL KEYWORDS: forced resettlement, forced relocation, forced movement, forced displacement, forced migration, forced to move, displaced
Language: English
Source/publisher: International Labour Office
Format/size: Main link (html by section); 2nd html link, complete text - for searching online (1800K); Word - for download (2010K)
Alternate URLs: http://www.ibiblio.org/obl/docs/myanmar-OBL.htm
http://www.ibiblio.org/obl/docs/myanmar-COI-OBL.doc
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: Myanmar: Ethnic Minority Rights under Attack
Date of publication: 22 July 1997
Description/subject: This report focuses . . . human rights violations against members of ethnic minority groups. These abuses, including extrajudicial executions; ill-treatment in the context of forced portering and labour; and intimidation during forcible relocations occur both in the context of counter-insurgency operations, and in areas where cease-fires hold. The State Law and Order Restoration Council SLORC, Myanmar's military government) continues to commit human rights violations in ethnic minority areas with complete impunity. This high level of human rights violations and the attendant political instability in Myanmar pose a major regional security issue for the country's new ASEAN partners. One dimension of this is the unprecedented numbers of refugees from Myanmar now in Thailand: a conservative estimate of some 200,000 refugees live in Thai cities and in camps along the Thai-Myanmar border. All of the refugees whom Amnesty International recently interviewed, and whose testimonies form the basis of this report, said that they had fled because they could no longer survive under the harsh forced labour and relocation practices of the SLORC. ... ADDITIONAL KEYWORDS: forced resettlement, forced relocation, forced movement, forced displacement, forced migration, forced to move, displaced
Language: English and French
Source/publisher: Amnesty International (ASA 16/20/97)
Format/size: html, pdf
Alternate URLs: http://www.amnesty.org/en/library/asset/ASA16/020/1997/en/ca9c92ae-ea43-11dd-8810-c1f7ccd3559e/asa1...
http://www.amnesty.org/en/library/info/ASA16/020/1997/en
http://www.amnesty.org/en/library/asset/ASA16/020/1997/en/cfed5a5a-ea43-11dd-8810-c1f7ccd3559e/asa1... (French)
Date of entry/update: 24 November 2010


Title: Thai-Burmese Border: Shan, Karen, Karenni (KHRG Commentary)
Date of publication: 18 July 1996
Description/subject: "The State Law & Order Restoration Council (SLORC) junta ruling Burma is now using mass forced relocations of entire geographic regions as a major element of military strategy. While this is not new to SLORC tactics, they have seldom or never done it to such an extent or so systematically before. The large-scale relocations began in Papun District of Karen State in December 1995 and January 1996, when up to 100 Karen villages were ordered to move within a week or be shot [see "Forced Relocation in Papun District", KHRG #96-11, 4/3/96]. These were all the villages in the region between Papun and the Salween River, an area about 50-60 km. north-south and 30 km. east-west. Most of them were ordered to move to sites beside military camps at Papun, Kaw Boke, Par Haik and Pa Hee Kyo, where SLORC was gathering people to do forced labour on the Papun-Bilin and Papun-Kyauk Nyat roads. However, the main reasons for the forced relocation were to cut off all possible support for Karen guerrilla columns in the area, most of which has only been SLORC-controlled since mid-1995, and to create a free-fire zone which would also block the flow of refugees from inside Karen State to the Thai border. Recently, though, SLORC troops in the area have limited their movements rather than combing the area, allowing some villagers to trickle back to their villages. This may be partly because of rainy season or because of the current SLORC-Karen National Union ceasefire talks, but it is probably largely because SLORC realised it could not control the result - people were fleeing into hiding in the jungle, some were fleeing to Thailand, but none were heading for the relocation camps..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Karen Human Rights Group (KHRG)
Format/size: html
Alternate URLs: http://www.khrg.org/khrg96/khrg96c3.html
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: Burma Human Rights Yearbook 1994: 13 - Protection of Minorities
Date of publication: September 1995
Language: English
Source/publisher: Human Rights Documentation Unit of the NCGUB
Format/size: html (11K)
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: Incoming Field Reports
Date of publication: 10 August 1994
Description/subject: "The following reports have recently been sent in by human rights monitors operating independently inside Karen areas. A few of the incidents were reported in radio messages from Karen frontline military units, and these are noted as such. Note that these field reports are not even close to a complete summary of all the killings and looting being done by SLORC troops -for every field report which is sent in, there are a hundred similar incidents which are not being reported..." Area: Mone Township, Nyaunglebin District, Thaton District, Toungoo District, Kya In Seik Gyi Township, Dooplaya District, Lu Thaw Township, Papun (Mudraw) District, Kyauk Kyi Township, Nyaunglebin District, Kyauk Kyi Township, Nyaunglebin District, Nyaunglebin District, Kyaikto Township, Mon State.
Language: English
Source/publisher: Karen Human Rights Group (KHRG)
Format/size: html
Alternate URLs: http://www.khrg.org/khrg94/94_08_10.html
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: BURMA: EXTRAJUDICIAL EXECUTION, TORTURE AND POLITICAL IMPRISONMENT OF MEMBERS OF THE SHAN AND OTHER ETHNIC MINORITIES
Date of publication: August 1988
Description/subject: "This document presents new evidence of a consistent pattern of unlawful killing and ill-treatment of members of Burma's ethnic minorities by security forces, including the army and police. It is a follow-up to a document published in May 1988, Burma: Extrajudicial Execution and Torture of Members of Ethnic Minorities. That document presented evidence of unlawful killings and torture of members of the Karen, Kachin and Mon ethnic minorities. This document provides information about allegations of similarly severe violations of the human rights of members of the Shan ethnic minority. It also describes the cases of two or three Shan who may be prisoners of conscience. There is information suggesting they may be imprisoned because of their ethnic background and their non-violent political opinions or peaceful exercise of the right to freedom of expression..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Amnesty International (ASA 16/10/88)
Format/size: pdf (158K)
Date of entry/update: 30 April 2006