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Other crops

Websites/Multiple Documents

Title: International Year of the Potato - 2008
Description/subject: "As wheat and rice prices surge, the humble potato is being rediscovered as a nutritious crop that could cheaply feed an increasingly hungry world."
Language: English,Francais, Russian, Espanol
Source/publisher: FAO
Format/size: html
Alternate URLs: http://www.potato2008.org/
Date of entry/update: 10 May 2008


Individual Documents

Title: Thaton Situation Update: Bilin Township, October 2015
Date of publication: 25 February 2016
Description/subject: "This Situation Update describes events occurring in Bilin Township, Thaton District in October 2015, including updates on the 2015 general election, education, and development projects. - Villages under the administration of the Burma/Myanmar government are able to vote in the 2015 general election. However, villages located in Karen National Union (KNU) controlled areas have not been adequately informed ahead of the election. - Local Karen teachers selected to teach in villages have had to resign after Burma/Myanmar government teachers were sent to teach in Bilin Township, sparking concerns that Karen language education will be given less attention and taught outside of school hours. - Heavy rain and floods damaged paddies, and, combined with an increase in the paddy price, caused livelihood concerns among some villagers. - The main roads that have been under construction in Bilin Township since 2013 will be completed during 2016. Although useful for the villagers, the road construction has caused problems for some villagers whose lands have been damaged..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Karen Human Rights Group (KHRG)
Format/size: pdf (502K)
Alternate URLs: http://khrg.org/2016/02/15-100-s1/thaton-situation-update-bilin-township-october-2015
Date of entry/update: 10 April 2016


Title: Myanmar Bio-Physical Characterization: Summary Findings and Issues to Explore
Date of publication: May 2013
Description/subject: This report provides a summary of key findings from research on food security and the agriculture sector in Myanmar. The focus is on material relevant for a bio-physical characterization of the country. As such, there is little emphasis on material primarily addressing socioeconomic, policy, or institutional aspects of agriculture and food security. This study is based solely on desk research, and it does not involve a field research component. The report is organized by topic, with each section including a bulleted list of significant summary points followed by a brief list of critical gaps or issues to explore during the field mission to Myanmar in November 2012.
Author/creator: Kye Baroang
Language: English
Source/publisher: Center on Globalization and Sustainable Development, Earth Institute at Columbia University
Format/size: pdf (1.8MB)
Date of entry/update: 12 April 2016


Title: Monopoly Tea Farms (Burmese)
Date of publication: 05 June 2011
Description/subject: "The Ta’ang (Palaung) people are traditionally tea cultivators, however, they currently face economic hardship due to a decline in the tea market in 2011. Although the tea price was good and many tea traders bought tea during the Shwe Pyi Oo (first harvest), one week later the price of tea fell and just a few traders were buying tea. After that the tea market was very weak and tea production almost came to a halt. The Shwe Pyi Oo tea season occurs over one month from the end of March to the end of April, and is an important time for the livelihoods of the Ta’ang people. The majority of Ta’ang people who produce tea live in Namhsam, Mantong, Namtu, Namkham, Kutkai, western Kyaukmae and Thipaw in Northern Shan State. Tea production is the main source of income for over (600,000) six hundred thousand Ta’ang people. Because the main source of income of the Ta’ang people is in crisis and the monopoly of the regime, the local population is facing many related economic, social, educational and health problems. The new Burma’s military regime and other organizations have not addressed the crisis that the Ta’ang people are facing as a result of the decline of the tea industry. Therefore, the Ta’ang (Palaung) working group has produced this briefing paper about the problems that Ta’ang tea cultivators are facing. Our objective is to inform people and to help solve the problems that Ta’ang tea cultivators are facing in the Palaung area..."
Language: Burmese
Source/publisher: Ta’ang (Palaung) Working Group - TSYO, PWO, PSLF
Format/size: pdf (396K-OBL version; 547K-original)
Alternate URLs: http://www.palaungland.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/Tea%20Briefing%20Paper%20by%20%20Burmese%20Ve...
Date of entry/update: 25 January 2012


Title: Monopoly Tea Farms (English)
Date of publication: 05 June 2011
Description/subject: The Ta’ang (Palaung) people are traditionally tea cultivators, however, they currently face economic hardship due to a decline in the tea market in 2011. Although the tea price was good and many tea traders bought tea during the Shwe Pyi Oo (first harvest), one week later the price of tea fell and just a few traders were buying tea. After that the tea market was very weak and tea production almost came to a halt. The Shwe Pyi Oo tea season occurs over one month from the end of March to the end of April, and is an important time for the livelihoods of the Ta’ang people. The majority of Ta’ang people who produce tea live in Namhsam, Mantong, Namtu, Namkham, Kutkai, western Kyaukmae and Thipaw in Northern Shan State. Tea production is the main source of income for over (600,000) six hundred thousand Ta’ang people. Because the main source of income of the Ta’ang people is in crisis and the monopoly of the regime, the local population is facing many related economic, social, educational and health problems. The new Burma’s military regime and other organizations have not addressed the crisis that the Ta’ang people are facing as a result of the decline of the tea industry. Therefore, the Ta’ang (Palaung) working group has produced this briefing paper about the problems that Ta’ang tea cultivators are facing. Our objective is to inform people and to help solve the problems that Ta’ang tea cultivators are facing in the Palaung area.
Language: English
Source/publisher: Ta’ang (Palaung) Working Group - TSYO, PWO, PSLF
Format/size: pdf (336K-OBL version; 503K-original))
Alternate URLs: http://www.palaungland.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/Tea%20Briefing%20Paper%20by%20%20English%20Ve...
Date of entry/update: 25 January 2012


Title: Tea Production On the Periphery of the British Empire
Date of publication: September 1991
Description/subject: The political economy of Shan tea under British colonial rule. "...Tawngpeng State, the major tea-producing area in the Federated Shan States, contained an area of 938 square miles. As of 1939 the population of Tawngpeng was 59,398 and it had a revenue of Rs. 645,634. The State was divided into 16 circles which corresponded as closely as possible to clan-divisions. Geographic features were characterised by hills ranging from five to seven thousand feet in height interspersed with valleys that averaged approximately ten miles in length and from a few hundred yards to a few miles in width. Maurice Collis, a former Burma civil servant, noted that upon approaching Namhsan, the capital of Tawngpeng which lies at the centre of the State at a height of six thousand feet, 'there is a vale and in the midst, ten miles away, is a ridge, on one end of which stands the town of Nam Hsan with the palace over it on a circular hill....The vale is one vast tea garden'. On the lower levels of the hillsides, Palaungs and Shans grow tea whilst higher up Kachins and Lisus practice shifting agriculture. Shans predominate in the valleys where rice is the staple crop..."
Author/creator: Robert Maule Department of History, University of Toronto
Language: English
Source/publisher: Thai-Yunnan Project Newsletter No. 14, September 1991
Alternate URLs: http://www.thedarjeelingtealady.com/tea/?p=17
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003