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The Internet - coverage

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Title: Podcasts from the 2013 Myanmar Update
Date of publication: 13 April 2013
Description/subject: "New Mandala readers who were unable to attend the March 2013 Myanmar Update Conference at the Australian National University will want to know that podcasts of the event are now available online. There are many hours of Myanmar-related discussion on a very wide range of different topics. More details on the event itself are posted here. And for those of you already looking forward to the next one, we tend to hold a Myanmar Update roughly every 18 months. More details will be posted when the time comes."
Author/creator: Nicholas Farrelly
Language: English
Source/publisher: "New Mandala"
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 16 July 2014


Title: Tweeting from Myanmar Update 2013
Date of publication: 15 March 2013
Description/subject: "New Mandala readers looking to follow the Myanmar Update Conference being held at the Australian National University on 15-16 March 2013 may enjoy the tweets accumulating under #MBU13. We also have a Facebook page. There will likely be a fair smattering of media coverage in the days ahead, especially on the back of President Thein Sein’s looming visit to Australia. Good to keep an eye out for all of the Myanmar action emanating from Canberra."
Author/creator: Nicholas Farrelly
Language: English
Source/publisher: "New Mandala"
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 16 July 2014


Individual Documents

Title: Mobile revolution lifts Myanmar out of telecom time warp
Date of publication: 27 July 2016
Description/subject: "Telecommunications in Myanmar has gone mobile at a phenomenal pace, driving down voice and data rates, with new entrants expected to heat up competition further. The Southeast Asian nation's mobile penetration rate has soared from 10% just two years ago to above 80%, or 43 million users, as of April. Virtually the entire population is expected to have coverage by the end of the year. The rapid rise stands out even among its Southeast Asian peers. Thailand and Indonesia took seven to eight years to go from 10% to 100%, while Vietnam made the jump in four years. Net mobile subscriber growth in the first quarter of 2016 totaled roughly 5 million. That equals roughly 10% of the population and the second-largest increase in the world, after India. Myanmar's mobile market is growing by leaps and bounds and has seen the most dramatic rise in data usage across Southeast Asia, according to Telenor Myanmar CEO Petter Furberg -- and this despite one of Asia's lowest per-capita nominal gross domestic products: $1,300 in 2015..."
Author/creator: Motokazu Matsui
Language: English
Source/publisher: Nikkei Asian Review
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 28 July 2016


Title: Furlongs on the road to digitopia
Date of publication: 24 June 2015
Description/subject: "Technological milestones – like the furlong posts on highways out of Yangon – help us to measure how far we have travelled. I recall vividly the first time I saw a tablet computer in Myanmar. It was early 2011 in Myitkyina and the Tatmadaw’s Northern Command was flexing its muscles, a prelude to the new Kachin war. The Kachin nationalists were disheartened that they had failed to get a viable slate of candidates up for the November 2010 election. Everyone was waiting for what would happen next. My conversations in Myitkyina were heavy with talk of the conflict to come. It was during one of these discussions that something caught my eye on the other side of the room: a flickering animated screen. Huddled around, a small group of teenagers expressed their amusement with, and their appreciation of, the high-tech marvel in their hands. Until then the only widely available computing facilities in places like Myitkyina were boisterous and ramshackle internet parlours. Most were full of young men and women. The boys tended to play shoot-’em-up games, while many of the women would spend their hours in chat rooms with friends from near and far. Some, of course, would use the internet for more serious surfing, for writing job applications and assignments, or for setting plans to make big moves to distant shores. But they were probably the minority. Back then, the country’s rickety internet infrastructure served as a distraction for kids with a bit of discretionary money and a whole lot of free time. Getting a seat in the most popular internet cafes could be a hassle for newcomers, but often somebody would make way for a dusty field researcher trying to check in on news from home. In such settings it was common to need layers of digital magic to get past Myanmar’s censors. Somewhere deep inside the Ministry of Information, faceless arbiters of political sentiment laboured to keep online rebellions in check..."
Author/creator: Nicholas Farrelly
Language: English
Source/publisher: "New Mandala"
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 15 July 2015


Title: Measuring the Information Society - 2013
Date of publication: 07 October 2013
Description/subject: Without Annex 4...."I am pleased to present to you the 2013 edition of Measuring the Information Society (MIS). Now in its fifth year, this annual report identifies key ICT developments and tracks the cost and affordability of ICT services, in accordance with internationally agreed methodologies. Its core feature is the ICT Development Index (IDI), which ranks countries’ performance with regard to ICT infrastructure and uptake. The report aims to provide an objective international performance evaluation based on quantitative indicators and benchmarks, as an essential input to the ICT policy debate in ITU Member States..."..."In Papua New Guinea, Myanmar, Eritrea and Niger, fewer than 2 per cent of the population is online..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Inernational Telecommunication Union (ITU)
Format/size: pdf (8.33MB; ICT Development Index - 2.1MB)
Alternate URLs: http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs16/MIS2013-ICT_Development_Index.pdf
Date of entry/update: 08 October 2013