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Home > Main Library > Education > Education in Burma/Myanmar > Education in Burma/Myanmar by levels of education > Tertiary (higher) education, training and capacity-building

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Tertiary (higher) education, training and capacity-building

Websites/Multiple Documents

Title: Inya Institute
Description/subject: "Inya Institute is a Yangon-based higher learning institute dedicated to advancing the social sciences, the arts and humanities as they are related to Myanmar. It is a non-political, non-religious, non-profit, and non-degree granting organisation. It seeks to build research and intellectual capacity for young local researchers, to foster scholarly exchange between local and international researchers, and to create original scholarship for international and local scholars. It further aims to raise the general public’s understanding of the country’s multi-faceted cultural legacy."....This site is in progress.
Language: English
Source/publisher: Inya Institute
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 03 September 2015


Title: Publications on "Vocational Training"
Description/subject: Article "Difficulties and prospects of vocational training in Africa" (pdf, 167 KB) MISEROR's experiences This article is also available in French (pdf, 180 KB)... Conference report "Training for (Self) Employment" (pdf, 239 KB) From an offer to a demand orientated vocational training... Guideline "Boarding Schools" (pdf, 18 KB) Essential considerations and suggestions regarding funding requests This guideline is also available in French (pdf, 14 KB)... Form “Follow-Up Statistics on Ex-Trainees” (pdf, 15 KB) This form can be printed out and used to fill in the actual data This form is also available in French (pdf, 22 KB)... Checklist "Elements to be included in an annual report" (pdf, 11 KB) Guideline for professional training projects This checklist is also available in French (pdf, 12 KB).
Language: English
Source/publisher: Misereor
Format/size: html, pdf
Date of entry/update: 25 March 2014


Title: Thabyay Education Foundation
Description/subject: "At Thabyay Education Foundation (TEF), we believe that quality education for all is the fulcrum for the development of peaceful, socially just, democratic and prosperous societies. Since we were founded in 1996, we have worked to support people from Myanmar to access the education and professional development opportunities that they need to help their society achieve these goals. The individuals and organizations that we support play prominent roles in the development of many keys sectors of Myanmar society, including education, healthcare, law, human rights, women's empowerment, environmental protection, community development, food security, livelihoods, social work, disability services and empowerment, peace building and reconciliation, media and journalism and youth development. Core Programs Thabyay Education Foundation consists of the following core programs: Kant Kaw Education Center, through which we offer English Classes for Exam Preparation (TOEFL and IELTS), Community Leadership and Social Studies Program and many other professional development courses. Curriculum Development – prepares and distributes context-appropriate curricular materials and teacher training. It focuses on preparing adult learners from marginalized communities in Myanmar. Thabyay E-Learning Platform, through Exam Preparation Outreach Program, offers online exam preparation packages. Scholarship and Student Support Department implements a number of scholarships - such as Open Society Foundation Network Scholarship, Prospect Burma - and provide essential support services to students studying abroad. Experiential Learning Program seeks to empower the civil society leaders and organizations in Myanmar."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Thabyay Education Foundation (TEF)
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 21 January 2016


Title: Universities in Myanmar
Language: English
Source/publisher: Wikipedia
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 02 June 2014


Title: University of Computer Studies, Yangon
Language: English
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 16 October 2012


Title: Yangon University of Distance Education
Description/subject: "ရည္ရြယ္ခ်က္ ေခတ္မီဖြံ႕ျဖိဳးတိုးတက္သည့္ ဒီမိုကေရစီ နိုင္ငံေတာ္သစ္ တည္ေဆာက္ရာတြင္ လိုအပ္သည့္ အရည္အခ်င္းျပည့္ဝေသာ ဥပေဒပညာရွင္မ်ား ေပၚထြန္းလာေစရန္ ဥပေဒပညာသာမက အဂၤလိပ္ဘာသာရပ္ နွင့္ နိုင္ငံတကာ အဆင့္မီ ေခတ္မီနည္းပညာ မ်ားကိုအသံုးခ်နိုင္သည့္ လူ့စြမ္းအား အရင္းအျမစ္မ်ား တိုးတက္ျဖစ္ေပၚလာေစရန္ အ‌ေဝးသင္တကၠသိုလ္မ်ား၏ေမွ်ာ္မွန္းခ်က္တြင္ပါဝင္သည့္ သင္ယူမႈအခြင့္အလမ္း (learning opportunities) မ်ားကို တိုးခ်ဲ႕ဖန္တီးေပးျခင္းျဖင့္ အရည္အေသြးျမင့္မားေသာလူ႕စြမ္းအား အရင္းအျမစ္မ်ားေမြးထုတ္ေပးရန္ ပညာေရးဝန္ၾကီးဌာနအေနျဖင့္ နိုင္ငံတကာအ‌ေဝးသင္တကၠသိုလ္ (open university) မ်ားနည္းတူ Online Education System ကိုအသံုးျပဳ၍ ဘြဲ ့ဒီဂရီသင္တန္းမ်ား ဖြင့္လွစ္ ပို႕ခ်ေနၿပီ ျဖစ္ေၾကာင္းျပသရန္ သင္တန္းအမ်ိဳးအစား ဥပေဒပညာဘြဲ႕ (LLB) သင္တန္း သင္တန္းဝင္ခြင့္အရည္အခ်င္း ၂၀၁၃ တကၠသိုလ္ဝင္စာေမးပြဲေအာင္ျမင္ျပီး ဥပေဒပညာသင္တန္း တက္ေရာက္ရန္ အမွတ္မီသူျဖစ္ရမည္။ တကၠသိုလ္တစ္ခုခုတြင္ ဒုတိယနွစ္ နွင့္အထက္ တက္ေရာက္လ်က္ရွိသူမ်ားျဖစ္ရမည္။ (တကၠသိုလ္ဝင္စာေမးပြဲေအာင္ျမင္သည့္ႏွစ္တြင္ ဥပေဒပညာသင္တန္း တက္ေရာက္ရန္ အမွတ္မီသူျဖစ္ရမည္။) တကၠသိုလ္တစ္ခုခုမွ ဘြဲ႕ရရွိျပီးသူျဖစ္ရမည္။ သင္တန္းသားဦးေရ သင္တန္းသားဦးေရ (၂၀ဝ) သင္တန္းကာလ သင္တန္းကာလ - ပထမနွစ္ မွ ပဥၥမနွစ္ထိ (၅) နွစ္ သင္တန္းနွစ္ တစ္နွစ္အတြက္ semester (၂) ခု ပထမနွစ္ဝက္ကာလ - နွစ္စဥ္ ဒီဇင္ဘာလ မွ မတ္လ အထိ (၄ - လ) ဒုတိယနွစ္ဝက္ကာလ - နွစ္စဥ္ ဇြန္လ မွ စက္တင္ဘာလ အထိ (၄ - လ)"...
Language: English
Source/publisher: Yangon University of Distance Education
Alternate URLs: http://www.yude.edu.mm/index.html
Date of entry/update: 27 September 2014


Individual Documents

Title: Making knowledge count
Date of publication: 17 August 2015
Description/subject: "Academic discussions sometimes get a bad rap. They are deemed tedious, even irrelevant, with unfocussed rambling on topics of only minor concern... The Myanmar people will want to see how academic ideas can be made useful in their lives. Such research is often best when it focuses on long-term considerations and the types of problems, like natural disasters, that cannot fit into daily news coverage. With good planning, Myanmar could create for itself an enviable array of knowledge that helps to secure its future. After the next election, making decisions about research priorities for the years ahead should be high on the agenda for Myanmar’s new government."
Author/creator: Nicholas Farrelly
Language: English
Source/publisher: "Myanmar Times"
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 25 August 2015


Title: An Overview of Higher Education Reform In Myanmar
Date of publication: 26 July 2015
Description/subject: Abstract: "The Education Reform especially in Higher Education has been started since 2011 when the shift of power from the military regime to the democratic one. Higher Education Institutes are governed mainly by the Minister of Education and other various Ministries. However, there is no much collaboration and coordination among Ministries. Moreover, the published policy or development plan which presents an overall strategy on higher education sector development is not formulated. There are some critical issues that the university sector that is serving only for elite students, in a country where the diversity of ethnicity, religion, language, and disabilities is challenging the state provision of education,moreover, in particular, language remains a dynamite issue in Myanmar. In Myanmar, there is also other financial challenge in Higher Education like the salaries of teachers and academics which leads to the negative consequence. Curriculum development is one of the considerable issues to be taken action. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of Higher Education Reform in Myanmar. This involved a detailed analysis of Higher Education Law, the system of administration, finance, and an example of recent change. A key question that emerged from the paper was what are the drawbacks and whether the recent change could lead to the development of Higher Education. This paper provides an initial attempt to analyze Higher Education Law and National Education Law and then leads to examining the extent to how much effective roles can the different actors take in educational changes and fits different complex educational changes by testing it out in the light of research studies of educational reform found largely, but not exclusively, within Myanmar. Moreover, this paper will compare the standard of curriculum and testing system with international Higher Education system. This paper will, first, presents the overview of Higher Education in Myanmar and combined with the model of complex educational change derived from the earlier study. Finally, conclusions will be drawn providing recommendations regarding the question of effectiveness and the development of Myanmar".....Paper delivered at the International Conference on Burma/Myanmar Studies: Burma/Myanmar in Transition: Connectivity, Changes and Challenges: University Academic Service Centre (UNISERV), Chiang Mai University, Thailand, 24-­26 July 2015.
Author/creator: Po Po Thaung Win
Language: English
Source/publisher: International Conference on Burma/Myanmar Studies: Burma/Myanmar in Transition: Connectivity, Changes and Challenges: University Academic Service Centre (UNISERV), Chiang Mai University, Thailand, 24-­26 July 2015
Format/size: pdf (459K)
Alternate URLs: http://rcsd.soc.cmu.ac.th/web/Burma/home.php#
Date of entry/update: 11 August 2015


Title: Language Choice in Higher Education - အဆင့္ျမင့္ပညာေရးတြင္ ဘာသာစကားေရြးခ်ယ္မႈ - စိန္ေခၚမႈမ်ားႏွင့္ အခြင့္အလမ္းမ်ာ
Date of publication: 14 February 2015
Description/subject: "အဆင့္ျမင့္ပညာေရးတြင္ ဘာသာစကားေရြးခ်ယ္မႈ - စိန္ေခၚမႈမ်ားႏွင့္ အခြင့္အလမ္းမ်ား ျမန္မာႏိုိင္ငံတြင္ အဆင့္ျမင့္ပညာေရးအတြက္ အေကာင္းဆံုးေသာ သင္ၾကားမႈဘာသာစကားမွာ အဂၤလိပ္စာ ျဖစ္ပါသလား။ အကယ္၍ ထိုသို႔ျဖစ္ခဲ့သည္ရွိေသာ္ မူလတန္းႏွင့္ အလယ္တန္းအဆင့္မ်ားတြင္ အဂၤလိပ္စာသင္ၾကားျခင္းကို ပို၍ အရွိန္ျမွင့္ အားသြန္ သင္ၾကားျခင္းသည္ ေဒသႏၲရတကၠသိုလ္မ်ားတြင္ ယခုလက္ရွိ ေတြ႔ႀကံဳေနရေသာ ျပႆနာမ်ားအတြက္ အေျဖျဖစ္လာမည္လား။ အထက္ပါေမးခြန္းမ်ားကို စဥ္းစားေဆြးေႏြးရန္ႏွင့္ အေရွ႕ေတာင္အာရွေဒသသာမက အျခားႏိုင္ငံမ်ားမွပါ ရရွိလာေသာ သင္ခန္းစာမ်ား မွ်ေဝမႈကို ျမႇင့္တင္ေပးရန္ ျမန္မာႏိုင္ငံ၊ ထိုင္းႏိုင္ငံ၊ မေလးရွားႏိုင္ငံ၊ ေဟာင္ေကာင္၊ ၾသစေၾတးလ်ႏိုင္ငံႏွင့္ ယူႏိုက္တက္ကင္းဒမ္းႏုိင္ငံတို႔မွ ပညာရွင္မ်ားကို ၿဗိတိသွ် အကယ္ဒမီႏွင့္ ျပင္သစ္ႏိုင္ငံအေရႇ႕တိုင္းပညာရပ္မ်ားေလ့လာေ ရးေက်ာင္းတို႔မွ ဖိတ္ေခၚခဲ့ပါသည္။ လက္ရွိ လုပ္ေဆာင္ေနဆဲျဖစ္ေသာ ျမန္မာႏိုင္ငံ၏ ဘက္စံုပါဝင္သည့္ ပညာေရးက႑ ျပန္လည္ သံုးသပ္ခ်က္ လုပ္ငန္းစဥ္အတြက္ အခ်က္အလက္မ်ား ပံ့ပိုးေပးရန္ဟူေသာ ရည္ရြယ္ခ်က္ျဖင့္ ဤအစီရင္ခံစာသည္ ေဆြးေႏြးမႈမ်ား၏ ရလာဒ္မ်ားကို အႏွစ္ခ်ဳပ္ တင္ျပထားသည့္အျပင္ ေပးအပ္လုိေသာ အဓိက သတင္းစကားမ်ားကိုလည္း ေဖာ္ထုတ္ထားပါသည္။..."
Language: Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: British Academy via Myanmar Information Management Unit (MIMU)
Format/size: pdf (2.19MB)
Alternate URLs: http://www.themimu.info/sector/education
http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs21/MIMU-2015-02-14-Language_Choice_in_Higher_Education-Challenges_a...
Date of entry/update: 30 September 2015


Title: Language Choice in Higher Education: Challenges and Opportunities
Date of publication: 14 February 2015
Description/subject: Introduction: "In Myanmar there have been several changes in policy relating to language choice in higher education over the past decades. Currently national law allows individual universities and departments to choose their preferred language of instruction, either English or Burmese, or some combination of the two. This has in practice resulted in virtually all higher education institutions in Myanmar adopting a policy whereby English is used as the sole medium of instruction, although ‘explanations’ of terminology and concepts may be given in Burmese. The prevalent view among local policy makers and university administrators when discussing the restructuring and revitalisation of the national education system is that instruction should be given in English. This reflects a widespread perception in Burmese society that English is the most important foreign language for university students to master, as it is seen as the dominant language of business, science and international affairs. The adoption of English in higher education institutions in Myanmar has, however, given rise to considerable challenges. On the one hand, the command of academic-level English among both students and lecturers is limited. On the other hand, the English- language teaching materials used are often decades out of date and many university departments are reluctant to rely on any Burmese language texts as auxiliary resources. Against this backdrop, the key questions which increasingly face local educators and policy makers are whether, at this juncture, English is the best medium of instruction for higher education in Myanmar, and, if so, whether the solution to existing problems lies in introducing more intensive English-language teaching at the primary and secondary levels..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: British Academy via Myanmar Information Management Unit (MIMU)
Format/size: pdf (2.61MB)
Alternate URLs: http://www.themimu.info/sector/education
http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs21/MIMU-2015-02-14-Language_Choice_in_Higher_Education-Challenges_a...
Date of entry/update: 30 September 2015


Title: Plan underway to open polytechnic schools and institutes
Date of publication: 22 December 2014
Description/subject: "...Union Minister at the President Office U Tin Naing Thein said that local authorities are to submit development plans to the regional governments and Hluttaws. He stressed the need to make arrangements to create job opportunities for growing number of population. He claimed that a plan is underway to open polytechnic schools and institutes for turning out technicians so as to meet the demand of skilled workers..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: "The Global New Light of Myanmar"
Format/size: pdf (71K)
Date of entry/update: 21 December 2014


Title: University Students Union Opposes Education Bill
Date of publication: 10 September 2014
Description/subject: "The University Students Union released a statement on Wednesday denouncing the National Education Bill; at the same time it launched an awareness campaign in front of the University for Computer Studies, 25km north of Rangoon. A spokesperson for the students’ union, commonly known in Burma as the ta-ka-tha, said the event was not a demonstration but rather “a gathering to raise awareness about the weaknesses of the education bill”, and that they had timed it to meet students who were entering the campus to sit for exams on Wednesday morning. The draft National Education Bill awaits the president’s signature since being approved by both houses of parliament in late July. Controversial from the outset, the bill’s detractors claim that it was drafted unilaterally and without enough transparency. Last month, a group of almost 100 students gathered at Mandalay’s Yadanabon University to voice opposition to certain aspects of the bill, claiming that it creates excessive restrictions on the formation of student unions and centralises Burma’s education system. Related Stories The All Burma Federation of Students Unions, or ba-ka-tha, has also released statements opposing the current draft of the Education Bill, as has the National Network for Education Reform, an independent oversight body. Burma has a high literacy rate – 93 percent, according to World Bank data released in 2012. However, the country’s education system was stymied under decades of military rule, and remains sorely short of highly-skilled instructors. The budget allocated for education in Burma is under six percent of national spending."
Author/creator: KAUNG HTET KYAW
Language: English
Source/publisher: Democratic Voice of Burma
Date of entry/update: 26 September 2014


Title: The Challenges Facing Higher Education in Myanmar
Date of publication: 25 August 2014
Description/subject: "It is not often that countries have the opportunity to undertake major development and reform of their higher education sectors, but that’s the position currently facing Myanmar. And inevitably there is a diversity of interested parties, both domestically and internationally, with firmly held views about what and how much to do. As is so often the case, there are rarely ‘right’ answers. With policy-makers in Myanmar approaching this challenge it is perhaps helpful to stand back and reflect on the role of tertiary education and think about what this might mean for the future development of the sector. The economic contribution of higher education usually features highly in any such reflection – whether because of its direct role in creating the highly skilled workforce that underpins longer term growth and development or because of its indirect role in driving economic growth through innovation. And of course the cases of Korea, China and the developed economies of the West are widely cited as exemplars in this respect. It is this economic contribution that fundamentally underpins what might be described as the ‘business case’ for investment in a country’s tertiary sector."
Author/creator: Christine Ennew
Language: English
Source/publisher: University World News
Alternate URLs: www.universityworldnews.com
Date of entry/update: 25 September 2014


Title: New law to see private universities use State curriculum
Date of publication: 03 July 2014
Description/subject: "Currently private universities are responsible for their own curriculum and many receive assistance in developing their courses from foreign universities. This will change after the National Educational Bill, which was submitted to parliament earlier this year, is enacted, said the official, who asked not to be named. “By the time the National Education Law is enacted, the curriculums of those private universities have to be [the same as] those of the state-owned universities,” the official said. He insisted that this would “not degrade” the standards of the private sector. “If they cannot teach it, we cannot recognise those schools. If every school teaches their own curriculum, we cannot know which school is better.” Private universities, of which there are more than 10 in Myanmar, say they are opposed to the provision in the draft law. U Nay Win Naing from Victoria College said students would lose out if the law is passed in its current form. “We are opening this university in this country and so we are going to follow this country’s law. However, the curriculum should not be degraded. If this happens, students will lose out,” he said. The NLD, which has been at the forefront of the push for education reform, is in favour of private universities being independent. It argues that rather than force private universities to adhere to the state curriculum, the state universities should raise their standards to those of the private sector."...
Author/creator: May Thinzar Naing
Language: English
Source/publisher: "Myanmar Times"
Format/size: html
Alternate URLs: http://www.mmtimes.com/
Date of entry/update: 26 September 2014


Title: Class Divide
Date of publication: 26 May 2014
Description/subject: "Since 2013, Ma Mya Mya Thet has been taking a one-year-and-five-month Master of Arts course in management and policy at the National Institute of Development Administration in Bangkok, Thailand, courtesy of a postgrad scholarship provided by the Thailand International Development Cooperation Agency (TICA). Her experience highlights the anxiety faced by many Myanmar students when it comes to teacher interactions in the classroom, at home or abroad. “My worst fear in the class is to ask questions and to be asked,” Ma Mya Mya Thet said in March following a TICA press conference at the Riva Surya Hotel about scholarships for Myanmar students. “It takes time for me to accustom myself to questioning the teachers in the class because we are not in the habit of asking questions,” said Ma Mya Mya Thet, who earned her bachelor degree in mechanical engineering from Pyay Government Technology College, then worked as a vice director at the Department of Labour under the Ministry of Labour, Employment and Social Security. “We used to learn by heart and take exams from what we memorised.” Now, she said, she’s working hard to adjust to a more open, dialogue-based classroom. “I try to get into the habit of asking questions if I don’t understand something. The pedagogy here encourages me to research and think for myself. It is a big difference,” she said. Ma Mya Mya Thet said Myanmar students on the whole are more motivated and disciplined than their foreign counterparts, and study very hard, with a serious attitude. They’re also better at writing in English than their Thai students, perhaps as a result of their diligent study habits. But she said Myanmar students tend to be weaker in English speaking, “because we don’t normally use the English language in the workplace.” That problem is compounded by the fact that they’re not used to raising their voices with confidence in the classroom."...
Author/creator: Zon Pann Pwint
Language: English
Source/publisher: http://www.mmtimes.com/index.php/special-features/182-education-2014/10500-class-divide.html
Date of entry/update: 26 September 2014


Title: Teaching Myanmar’s next generation of lawyers
Date of publication: 18 September 2013
Description/subject: Major changes have already been made to the legal system in Myanmar over the last two years... The next 10 years will be crucial to the country’s transition to a democratic legal system. As the reform process progresses, there is an urgent need for a new generation of law graduates capable of contributing to the development and consolidation of the law reform process..."
Author/creator: Melissa Crouch
Language: English
Source/publisher: East Asia Forum
Format/size: html
Alternate URLs: http://www.eaber.org/node/23614
Date of entry/update: 26 December 2014


Title: International Relations Course for Developing-world Higher Education
Date of publication: 14 September 2013
Description/subject: "The Institute of International Education, or IIE, has announced the launch of a new training course for ministry officials and university representatives in developing and transitioning countries on how to create and manage an effective international relations office. To be piloted in Myanmar over the next few months, the course “Connecting to the World: International relations for higher education institutions” is expected to meet a vital need identified during an IIE-led higher education delegation visit to the country earlier this year. It will also allow universities in Myanmar to link up with institutions in America and other countries so that they can increase institutional capacity and help prepare students to meet workforce needs and support rapid economic development, the IIE said in a statement. On a visit to Myanmar in February this year by a delegation of 10 universities, led by IIE CEO Allan Goodman, the country’s universities highlighted their need to develop existing internal processes and procedures to coordinate international relations and enter into productive partnerships as Myanmar reopens to the world. The IIE said that while the course was intended to address an immediate need in Myanmar, it would “shape similar initiatives that can be used in a number of other transitioning countries in the future”."...
Language: English
Source/publisher: University World News
Date of entry/update: 25 September 2014


Title: Reconstructing higher education in Myanmar
Date of publication: 26 July 2013
Description/subject: "The last time the world took notice of higher education in Myanmar, it was in the aftermath of the brutally repressed student uprising of August 1988, which resulted in thousands of deaths and arrests and stronger sanctions from the international community. The political transition that started in 2011 has triggered the resumption of international collaboration in the higher education sector and the launch of a comprehensive education sector review led by the government of Myanmar with strong support from development partners."...
Author/creator: Jamil Salmi
Language: English
Source/publisher: University World News
Alternate URLs: http://www.universityworldnews.com/search.php?query=Myanmar&type=all&mode=search
Date of entry/update: 25 September 2014


Title: Investing in the Future: Rebuilding Higher Education in Myanmar
Date of publication: April 2013
Description/subject: Key findings include: * In considering international educational cooperation, key contextual issues need to be taken into account, including the political context; the lack of social capital; the current lack of capacity to build international ties; the educational context; and the centralization/decentralization of bureaucracy and higher education. * The Myanmar government has made reform of the entire higher education system a national priority. One of the main drivers is the recognition of the important role of human capital to the economic development goals of the country. * There is a very high level of enthusiasm and energy for addressing Myanmar’s pressing needs in higher education among university administrators, faculty and students. However, the challenges and needs currently exceed the capacity of the political and economic system to respond effectively. * The needs of higher education in Myanmar are extensive, from physical infrastructure and information technology, to the academic curriculum, the upgrading of the quality of faculty, reform higher education administration and governance, and international engagement. * Despite the many challenges, small-scale interactions with higher education institutions in Myanmar will help not only to address a number of immediate needs, but also to create the partnerships that can lay the groundwork for larger engagements.... * Recommendations for short- to mid-term goals for U.S.-Myanmar higher education cooperation include: o Expanding person-to-person networks through faculty and staff exchanges; o Helping inform the vision of Myanmar higher education through cooperation in curriculum development and basic research methods, as well as exposure to modern teaching methodologies and organizational/administrative issues; o Assisting in infrastructure development, especially related to libraries and science facilities; o Enhancing English language capacity of academic staff to teach effectively in English; o Better coordination of resources and current efforts, to avoid redundancy, maximize leveraging from individual initiatives and provide the greatest possible benefit from those limited resources..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Institute of International Education
Format/size: pdf (656K)
Alternate URLs: http://www.iie.org/Research-and-Publications/Publications-and-Reports/IIE-Bookstore/Rebuilding-High...
Date of entry/update: 06 October 2014


Title: Historic Chance for Higher Education in Myanmar
Date of publication: 16 March 2013
Description/subject: "It was the largest delegation of US universities to travel to Myanmar, and we were accompanied by representatives of the US Embassy and the US Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs. We visited nine universities throughout Myanmar and engaged in in-depth discussions with several government ministries, including the Ministry of Education, Ministry of Science and Technology and Ministry of Health. As the first step to building deeper academic engagement between our two countries, the delegation members gave extremely well-received lectures and workshops for more than 1,000 faculty and students. We covered such topics as finding and making strategic partnerships, faculty development and accreditation processes and procedures. This is a critical juncture for engaging with Myanmar."...
Author/creator: Allan E Goodman
Language: English
Source/publisher: University World News
Alternate URLs: http://www.universityworldnews.com/search.php?query=Myanmar&type=all&mode=search
Date of entry/update: 25 September 2014


Title: Building Asia’s Platform for Student Mobility
Date of publication: 02 December 2012
Description/subject: "A time scale has been established for setting up a common credit transfer scheme between several South East Asian and neighbouring countries, which will be crucial for encouraging student mobility within Asia."... "In Malaysia and Thailand students’ credits are easily recognised by domestic and partner institutions. However, credit transfer is at an early stage in Myanmar, and students can only move within the country, rather than abroad."...
Author/creator: Hiep Pham
Language: English
Source/publisher: University World News
Date of entry/update: 25 September 2014


Title: Universities become independent bodies from Higher Education Department
Date of publication: 06 September 2012
Language: English
Source/publisher: Amyotha Hluttaw via "The New Light of Myanmar"
Format/size: pdf (69K)
Date of entry/update: 13 September 2012


Title: Capacity dilemma in Myanmar
Date of publication: 05 September 2012
Description/subject: "Profound disagreements among careful observers and participants on the Myanmar scene are still prevalent on President Thein Sein’s current reforms, including over their significance, extent, and likely longevity. These include pro and anti-sanctions groups, insiders on both sides of the reform fence, and various interested governments of distinct and distant preferences. Yet on one issue there is virtually unanimous agreement: the institutions of Myanmar lack sufficient capacity and institutions are essential if reforms are to take deep root. Thein Sein and opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, separately or together, are personally necessary for reforms to succeed. But their personalities alone are not sufficient. To implement reforms in any field and to build institutions, the need for training and the development of modern skills in traditional and emerging avenues are self evident. "Training" is the watchword of the day in Myanmar..."
Author/creator: David I Steinberg
Language: English
Source/publisher: "Asia Times Online"
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 12 September 2012


Title: Higher Education Bill Scrapped over Lack of University Autonomy
Date of publication: 26 August 2012
Description/subject: "In a major upset, the Education Ministry’s higher education bill was rejected during the final stages of its passage through Myanmar’s Hluttaw, or parliament, after opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi and other legislators criticised it. It is the first time that the lower house has scrapped an entire bill rather than amending it. A new bill to increase university autonomy and place institutions on the road to international competitiveness will be drafted by legislators after the proposed bill was thrown out on 31 July because it would not allow universities enough freedom. Amendments would not be sufficient, Aung San Suu Kyi said, requesting parliament “to bring about a bill that is more suitable, for this country, this era and this world”. Suspension of the ministry’s bill would “enable the Hluttaw to discuss a higher education bill that is more comprehensive, brings more benefit to the country and represents the voice of the students,” said Thein Nyunt, the MP responsible for putting forward the eleventh-hour motion to scrap the bill. Legislators said the ministry’s proposed bill simply mirrored the system set up by the previous military regime, and blamed government control of universities for the collapse of higher education standards in recent decades."...
Author/creator: Naw Say Phaw Waa
Language: English
Source/publisher: University World News
Date of entry/update: 25 September 2014


Title: Technology Institutes to Reopen after more than Two Decades
Date of publication: 19 August 2012
Description/subject: "In a bid to improve much-needed science and technology capacity in Myanmar, the government has announced that it will reopen two technological universities – in Yangon and Mandalay – that were closed by the military junta more than two decades ago. Myanmar’s Science and Technology Minister Aye Myint said the two universities, Yangon Technology University (YTU) and Mandalay Technology University (MTU), as well as the newer Yangon Computer University and Mandalay Computer University, would open before others under the country’s new Centres of Excellence programme to upgrade higher education institutions. YTU and MTU will reopen on their old campuses in the centre of Yangon and Mandalay respectively after being closed since 1988."...
Author/creator: Naw Say Phaw Waa
Language: English
Source/publisher: News and Periodicals Enterprise, Ministry of Information, Union of Myanmar
Date of entry/update: 25 September 2014


Title: Restoring Yangon University to Its Former Glory Captures Public Mood
Date of publication: 12 August 2012
Description/subject: "The campus of Yangon University, formerly Rangoon University, in the centre of the city, is semi-abandoned. Tall grass surrounds the old convocation hall still used by a number of universities for delivering degrees. But other structures, particularly the old student buildings, are in a dilapidated state. Some classes are still held for postgraduate and doctoral students but the main university, along with other Yangon universities, was relocated to the outskirts of town in the 1990s. With its history of student activism and dissent since British Colonial times, the military government relocated the university in part to quell student activism and prevent student demonstrations gaining support within the city. Ma Ei studied for a masters degree in international relations at the old campus in 2008. “It was very dirty, with old buildings and a lot of [overgrown] bushes. The environment was very poor,” she told University World News. In addition, the once-leafy campus lost many of its trees during Cyclone Nargis in 2008. “Many of the big trees were destroyed, almost all of the old trees are gone.” But now, as the Myanmar government looks to invest in four of its major universities as centres of excellence – part of its efforts to rebuild higher education – Yangon residents have been engaged in excited discussions over the future of the campus. This follows a suggestion by a senior presidential advisor that Yangon University be restored to its former glory as one of South East Asia’s top universities."...
Author/creator: Naw Say Phaw Waa
Language: English
Source/publisher: University World News
Alternate URLs: http://www.universityworldnews.com/
Date of entry/update: 25 September 2014


Title: International Help to Upgrade Burma's Neglected university Sector
Date of publication: 25 June 2012
Description/subject: "The United Kingdom has said it will help Burma improve its higher education sector, according to an announcement on Monday pledging support to education in Burma at both the school and post-school levels. “Plans are afoot in tertiary education aimed at strengthening higher education institutions,” said Martin Davidson, chief executive of the British Council, after a meeting in London with Burma’s opposition leader leader Aung San Suu Kyi. “We hope to provide support and opportunities for academic mobility and develop research and teaching links between academics and students in our two countries The British Council told Suu Kyi it would continue its work to develop Burma’s education system, which is seen as vital to generate stability and opportunities for the country’s future. Aung San Suu Kyi described education as key to Burma’s security and development in a speech to the UK parliament on 21 June, during an official visit which included collecting an honorary doctorate of civil law at Oxford University almost two decades after it was first awarded to her."...
Author/creator: Yojana Sharma
Language: English
Source/publisher: University World News
Alternate URLs: http://www.universityworldnews.com/search.php?query=Myanmar&type=all&mode=search
Date of entry/update: 25 September 2014


Title: End of Sanctions may Improve Prospects for Unemployed Graduates
Date of publication: 04 March 2012
Description/subject: "Than Myint said it was heartbreaking for her to see so few job opportunities for young graduates. But the problem is widespread. “I was shocked when I saw a classified advisement in front of a huge house. It said only a graduate is qualified for a job as a security guard,” said Yangon taxi driver U Thar Htet (54). Myanmar has around 616,500 students in higher education, according to 2009 figures, but chances of secure employment once they graduate are poor, and private sector salaries are low. The government does not publish figures on graduate unemployment, but the problem is now being openly aired. “I have learned that most of the graduates here are jobless,” National League for Democracy (NLD) leader Aung San Su Kyi told people in Waa Tin Ka village, 30 kilometres south of Yangon where she has been campaigning for a seat in by-elections that take place on 1 April. “I believe that we [the National League for Democracy] should consider as a first step to provide job opportunities for people who have graduated, not yet graduated, middle-age people and old people,” she said on 11 February."...
Author/creator: Naw Say Phaw Waa
Language: English
Source/publisher: University World News
Date of entry/update: 25 September 2014


Title: Education in Transition: A Preliminary Study of Capacity Development for Civil Society Actors in Burma/Myanmar
Date of publication: 21 February 2012
Description/subject: "Burma/Myanmar is currently in a transition with important ramifications for capacity development efforts. The present preliminary study explores some of the critical issues at stake for capacity development activities in order to better understand how the field as a whole can continue to undertake effective trainings and evolve to adapt to current trends. Of particular interest to the researchers is the question of how to teach human rights and social sciences in complex settings such as in Burma/Myanmar and how this field may evolve. The preliminary research has two research interests: contemporary issues of concern in capacity development which need to be addressed by the current stakeholders; and the interaction between the stakeholders within the capacity development network (including Burma/Myanmar participants, Burma/Myanmar organizations, universities, Thai based organizations, political groups, and so on). As a preliminary study, this report seeks to give some first impressions of the current situation of the capacity development field during a period of change in Burma/Myanmar. This research does not attempt to quantify the field or undertake a mapping of it. Rather, the preliminary study intends to draw out issues and concerns expressed by stakeholders in capacity development which can guide future directions of activity, development, and research. The capacity development field is large, yet there has been limited analysis of how this field works and few studies of how stakeholders adapt to current changes. This report wishes to contribute to the understanding of capacity development in the field of human rights and social sciences in three specific ways: • Understanding how and why young Myanmar people get involved in civil society activities. • Understanding how the capacity development field is structured and how it operates. • Understanding what organizational and quality concerns capacity development organizations should be addressing..."
Author/creator: Camilla Buzzi, Mike Hayes, Matthew Mullen
Language: English
Source/publisher: Institute for Human Rights and Peace Studies, Mahidol University
Format/size: pdf (404K - OBL version; 484K - original))
Alternate URLs: http://www.humanrights-mu.org/attachments/article/92/Education%20in%20Transition-IHRP.pdf
Date of entry/update: 21 February 2012


Title: University student condemns the SPDC’s education system
Date of publication: 05 May 2004
Description/subject: Akyab, May 5: "The ruling State Peace and Development Council’s (SPDC) international claim that it is focussing on the educational development of students living in the border areas is a lie, said a newly exiled Arakanese student in Bangladesh. He fled to Bangladesh after he graduated from Akyab University in Physics. The SPDC’s procedures are badly organised, said the student, Saw Bhone Tun..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Narinjara News
Format/size: html (7K)
Date of entry/update: 05 May 2004


Title: UNIVERSITIES, COLLEGES ORDERED CLOSED FROM MONDAY
Date of publication: 02 June 2003
Description/subject: Chittagong, June 02: "Universities and colleges in Burma have been ordered closed from Monday 2 June until further notice following the arrest by junta authorities of Daw Aung San Suu Kyi , according to AFP, Rangoon..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: AFP via KALADAN NEWS
Format/size: html (6K)
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: Universities, Colleges shut after Daw Suu detention in Burma
Date of publication: 02 June 2003
Description/subject: Dhaka, 2 June 03: "University and colleges in Burma have been closed indefinitely following the detention by military authorities of Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Aung Sann Suu Kyi, university sources said yesterday, According to today�s "The Independent"..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: "The Independent" (Dhaka) via Narinjara News
Format/size: html (5K)
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: Universities Opened and Closed Since 1988
Date of publication: January 2003
Description/subject: Dates Burmese universities opened and closed. Updated January 2003
Language: English
Source/publisher: "The Irrawaddy" Research Pages
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 17 September 2010


Title: When Universities Close
Date of publication: December 2001
Description/subject: The repeated closure of universities in Burma has left the country without much-needed medical expertise. How much can NGOs do to make up for lost time?..." "Now that Burma had had no doctors graduating for two years (except possibly military doctors from their own school) the government encouraged training of lay village health workers. Because we had done similar teaching in rural Thailand for another group, the organization had invited my wife and me to join the team. We came once in 1996 when they began their project, and again in 1998 to see how well the students could remember and use such teaching. By that time there were 500 who had taken the three-week training course; some of them were quite competent as far as their training went, each working with about thirty families in her home village. Others were woefully inadequate at making decisions, even though they could remember facts." ... "In Burma, elementary school itself is free, but many can't afford all the fees the teachers must charge. Children have to buy textbooks, uniforms, paper and pencils; they must often pay athletic fees, examination fees, buy cleaning supplies for the classroom - the expenses can go on and on. The government has invested very little in the education system. Most children drop out before middle school." He shrugged. "If you want an education, join the army."
Author/creator: Keith Dahlberg
Language: English
Source/publisher: "The Irrawaddy" Vol. 9, No. 9
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 17 September 2010