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Home > Main Library > Water, including dams > Water bodies (global. regional) > Human activities in, on and around Burma's water bodies > Threats to Burma's water bodies and their communities > Dams and other projects on specific rivers of Burma/Myanmar > Dams and other projects on the Salween and its tributories

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Dams and other projects on the Salween and its tributories

Websites/Multiple Documents

Title: Burma Rivers Network
Description/subject: Includes sections on the major rivers of Burma
Language: English
Source/publisher: Burma Rivers Network
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 19 July 2012


Title: Noung Pha and Man Taung Hydropower Project
Description/subject: Dam Specifications | Companies Involved | Finance | Project Status | Impacts |
Language: English
Source/publisher: Burma Rivers Network
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 05 August 2015


Individual Documents

Title: Documentary raises alarm over Shan region threatened by Salween dam
Date of publication: 29 September 2016
Description/subject: "Activists yesterday released a 30-minute documentary as part of a campaign against a mega-dam in central Shan State. The documentary, called Drowning a Thousand Islands, includes local people from the remote Kunhing area voicing their concerns that the proposed Mong Ton hydropower project will irrevocably damage the Salween River. Last month, the government announced they would continue with hydropower projects along the Salween, sparking fierce opposition from Shan political parties and armed groups. “We need to preserve the Pang River, a hidden gem of the Salween. This tributary is home to unique aquatic ecosystems. The Mong Ton project will destroy this wonderful natural heritage area,” said Sai Khur Hseng, an environmental activist. According to Action for Shan State Rivers, the film took six months to make. The Kunhing area of central Shan has been off-limits for years due to ethnic conflicts. From 1996-1998, the Tatmadaw engaged in a scorched earth campaign in the region, displacing over 300,000 people in central Shan and killing hundreds in Kunhing..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: "Myanmar Times"
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 30 September 2016


Title: Salween dams threaten river communities
Date of publication: 29 September 2016
Description/subject: "The Thai government's recent push to speed up its energy investment in Myanmar's Salween River contradicts its own efforts to warn Thai investors from operating overseas projects that violate human rights. A number of hydropower dams proposed for the Salween River, and co-invested in by the state-run Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (Egat) and companies in China and Myanmar, would force tens of thousands of ethnic minorities to leave their homes and undermine the current peace process in Myanmar. In May this year, the Thai government issued a cabinet resolution proposing measures that would require Thai investors to adhere to the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights wherever they operate overseas. The UN framework specifically highlights the threats to human rights posed by investment in conflict zones. But early this week, Thailand's permanent secretary for energy Areepong Bhoocha-oom, said the Ministry of Energy planned to meet its Myanmar counterpart to discuss the country's investment in proposed hydropower projects on the Salween River, along with a coal-fired power plant in the southern town of Myeik. The Salween River, known as Thanlwin in Myanmar, is one of Asia's last largely free-flowing rivers, running from China, through to Myanmar and Thailand. It is also the site of a planned cascade of six massive dams, including the Mong Ton Dam in Shan State and Hat Gyi Dam in Karen State. The majority of the electricity will be sold to Thailand..."
Author/creator: Pianporn Deetes
Language: English
Source/publisher: "Bangkok Post"
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 30 September 2016


Title: Drowning A Thousand Islands (Burmese version) - video
Date of publication: 28 September 2016
Description/subject: "A new documentary film launched by Action for Shan State Rivers (On 28 Sept 2016) reveals the unique natural beauty of the “Thousand Island” area along the Pang River tributary of the Salween, currently threatened by plans to build the giant Mong Ton dam in southern Shan State, Burma. The film, “Drowning a Thousand Islands,” takes viewers into the remote Kunhing area of central Shan State, out of bounds for decades due to the ongoing conflict. Drone footage provides bird’s eye panoramas of hitherto unseen waterfalls, rapids and ancient temples nestled among the countless islands in the Pang river. Local farmers and fisherfolk recount the area’s rich cultural history, and the devastating impacts of the Burma Army’s scorched earth campaigns over a decade ago, evidence of which is shown in rare archival footage. Refugees who fled to Thailand at that time, and still dare not return, are also interviewed."
Language: Shan (Burmese sub-titles)
Source/publisher: Action for Shan State Rivers via Youtube
Format/size: Adobe Flash (30 minutes)
Date of entry/update: 30 September 2016


Title: Drowning A Thousand Islands (English version) - video
Date of publication: 28 September 2016
Description/subject: "A new documentary film launched by Action for Shan State Rivers (28 Sept 2016) reveals the unique natural beauty of the “Thousand Island” area along the Pang River tributary of the Salween, currently threatened by plans to build the giant Mong Ton dam in southern Shan State. The film, “Drowning a Thousand Islands,” takes viewers into the remote Kunhing area of central Shan State, out of bounds for decades due to the ongoing conflict. Drone footage provides bird’s eye panoramas of hitherto unseen waterfalls, rapids and ancient temples nestled among the countless islands in the Pang river. Local farmers and fisherfolk recount the area’s rich cultural history, and the devastating impacts of the Burma Army’s scorched earth campaigns over a decade ago, evidence of which is shown in rare archival footage. Refugees who fled to Thailand at that time, and still dare not return, are also interviewed..."
Language: Shan, English sub-titles
Source/publisher: Action for Shan State Rivers via Youtube
Format/size: Adobe Flash (30 minutes)
Date of entry/update: 30 September 2016


Title: Concerns about the Naung Pha dam on the Salween River (English, Shan, Burmese, Thai))
Date of publication: 23 August 2016
Description/subject: "We are strongly opposed to any dams on the free-flowing Salween River, a vital artery sustaining millions of ethnic people in eastern Burma. Any blockage to its mighty flow would have far-reaching environmental and social impacts. However, the general perception in central Burma appears to be that the Salween is at a remote edge of the country, and dams will have little impact. In particular there is little public knowledge about the Salween in “remote” northeastern Shan State. We therefore wish to highlight some specific concerns about the Naung Pha Dam as follows:..."
Language: English, Shan, Burmese, Thai
Source/publisher: Action for Shan State Rivers
Format/size: pdf (1MB-English; 1.4MB-Shan; 1MB-Burmese; 1.1MB-Thai)
Alternate URLs: http://www.shanhumanrights.org/index.php/news-updates/252-concerns-about-the-naung-pha-dam-on-the-s...
http://www.shanhumanrights.org/images/stories/pdf/2016/August_2016/Briefing%20paper%20on%20the%20Na... (Shan)
http://www.shanhumanrights.org/images/stories/pdf/2016/August_2016/Briefing%20paper%20on%20the%20Na... (Burmese)
http://www.shanhumanrights.org/images/stories/pdf/2016/August_2016/Briefing%20paper%20on%20the%20Na... (Thai)
Date of entry/update: 25 August 2016


Title: Open letter from 26 Shan community groups to Daw Aung San Suu Kyi to cancel Salween dams
Date of publication: 17 August 2016
Description/subject: "...We are writing to express our great concern at your government's announcement on August 12 that you will proceed with hydropower dams on the Salween river, as the best option to meet Burma's energy needs. The Salween is a vital artery for millions of ethnic people in eastern Burma, Thailand and China, who will be irreparably impacted by blockage of its mighty flow. There has been consistent opposition to the Salween dams by communities in Shan, Karenni, Karen and Mon States, as well as other parts of Burma and neighbouring countries. We wish to remind you that the Salween river basin has been a conflict area for decades, where the Burma Army has been relentlessly expanding and committing systematic atrocities against villagers in its attempts to control ethnic lands and resources. Pushing ahead with these unpopular dams will inevitably lead to more Burma Army militarization, increased conflict, and ongoing atrocities..."
Language: English, Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: 26 Shan community groups
Format/size: pdf (97K-English; 152K-Burmese)
Alternate URLs: http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs22/Shan_groups-2016-08-17-Open_letter_to_ASSK_re_Salween_dams-bu.pdf
Date of entry/update: 18 August 2016


Title: SMEC defends role in assessing Myanmar dam
Date of publication: 04 August 2015
Description/subject: "The Snowy Mountains Engineering Corp has the tough task of carrying out the environmental assessment for a Myanmar dam that's opposed by local communities...The Snowy Mountains Engineering Corp has defended its role in drawing up an environmental impact assessment report for a controversial dam in Myanmar that faces strong local resistance. The 7,000 megawatt dam on the Salween River in eastern Myanmar is backed by Chinese, Myanmar and Thai companies, and will flood 676 square kilometres of low-lying farmland and forest. The dam, in eastern Shan State, is being funded by China Three Gorges Corporation and Thailand's Electricity Generating Authority, and is also known as the Mong Ton Hydropower Project. Despite strong resistance from local communities SMEC says it is undertaking the environmental and social impact assessments (EIA/SIA) and adhering to international best practice..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: AAP
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 05 August 2015


Title: Think Like a Mountain: Toward a Perspective for Interdisciplinary Ecosystem Research
Date of publication: 25 July 2015
Description/subject: Introduction: "This might refer to our relationship with the environment just as well as to that between a man and a woman. Our relationship with the environment requires careful attention for we must take care of it if we want it to reciprocate. Around the globe today, that relationship is being challenged. We are here in a wondrous and wonderful part of the world. This sketch of Asia’s major rivers flowing down from the Tibetan plateau illustrates just how central our location is, both geographically and in terms of the hundreds of millions of human lives and other biological phenomena impacted by the flow of these waters. The river of concern for me today is the Salween, in some locations called the Nu Jiang or the Thanlwin. Lately my focus has been on Myanmar (Burma) and its current struggles to emerge form a long period of difficult political and economic conditions. Many, dare I say all of us, desire to help this great country to achieve higher levels of prosperity and sustainable well-­being. One focal point for many has become the Salween..." .....Paper delivered at the International Conference on Burma/Myanmar Studies: Burma/Myanmar in Transition: Connectivity, Changes and Challenges: University Academic Service Centre (UNISERV), Chiang Mai University, Thailand, 24-­25 July 2015
Author/creator: James Lin Compton
Language: English
Source/publisher: International Conference on Burma/Myanmar Studies: Burma/Myanmar in Transition: Connectivity, Changes and Challenges: University Academic Service Centre (UNISERV), Chiang Mai University, Thailand, 24-­25 July 2015
Format/size: pdf (85K)
Date of entry/update: 06 August 2015


Title: Thanlwin dam still in the planning stages
Date of publication: 17 July 2015
Description/subject: "Planned hydropower projects on the Thanlwin river are still in the early stages, according to Ministry of Electric Power officials, disputing claims in Thai media that a memorandum of understanding for one project will be signed later this year. Thai newspaper The Nation reported on July 15 that Thailand, Myanmar and China are to sign a memorandum of understanding to develop a 7000 megawatt project on the upper Thanlwin at Mong Ton, citing Thai energy minister Narongchai Akrasanee. The article said Electricity Generation Authority of Thailand International and China’s Three Gorges would both hold 40 percent stakes, while the Myanmar government would hold the remaining 20pc. The plan was for 10pc of the output to kept in Myanmar and 90pc exported to Thailand, the article said. However, Myanmar authorities said projects on the Thanlwin – also known as the Salween – river have been delayed for a number of reasons, with several memorandums of understanding already signed but little progress having been made..."
Author/creator: Aung Shin
Language: English
Source/publisher: "Myanmar Times"
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 05 August 2015


Title: Our Rivers Are Not for Sale
Date of publication: 16 March 2015
Description/subject: "When the government in Naypyidaw looks at the Salween River and other rivers in Burma, they don’t see their beauty: they see Thai baht, Chinese yuan, US dollars and Indian rupees. For them, the rivers flowing through the lands of our ethnic communities are nothing more than a potential source of revenue. Not revenue for local people, but for the central government: they want to dam our rivers, sell most of the energy they generate to neighboring countries, and keep the money for themselves. This money will be partly used to continue the modernization of the Burmese military, which is expanding its presence in the country’s ethnic hinterlands and still committing human rights abuses. We ethnic peoples will still be sitting in the dark, and paying for our own repression...Economically, politically and environmentally, dams are not the right choice for Burma. They will continue to provoke conflict, human rights abuses, environmental destruction, and increased marginalization and impoverishment of affected communities. They will not help the development of our country; they will hinder it. Rather than selling our rivers in return for a meager financial reward, our country needs a long-term energy policy based on clean, renewable energy."
Author/creator: Hsa Moo
Language: English
Source/publisher: "The Irrawaddy"
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 16 March 2015


Title: Taming the wild Salween
Date of publication: 21 January 2015
Description/subject: "Time may be running out for Southeast Asia’s last major undammed river - the Salween, also known as the Nu in China and Thanlwin in Myanmar, which originates high in the mountains of Tibet and flowing south for 2,800 kilometers through the east of Myanmar into the Andaman Sea. There are plans to construct 19 dams along the length of the river and its tributaries. While visions of harnessing the river for hydropower are decades old, various setbacks including vocal opposition from environmental and human rights groups - over a dozen ethnic minority groups live along the river’s banks - as well as ongoing conflict in Myanmar’s restive eastern states, have so far prevented their realization. This could be set to change with the riparian governments’ increasing determination to bring the dream to fruition..."
Author/creator: Alec Forss
Language: English
Source/publisher: Asia Times Online
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 01 February 2015


Title: Damming Myanmar: Australian Involvement and the Shan’s Resistance
Date of publication: 2015
Description/subject: Australian involvement and the Shan’s resistance: "SMEC, an Australian-based services company that morphed out of the Snowy Mountains Engineering Corporation, was recently handed a petition containing 23,717 signatures opposing a giant dam on the upper Salween River at Mong Ton that would effectively divide Myanmar’s warshocked Shan state in half. It was not the first time it had been told the idea stinks. Undeterred, SMEC went back to the protest ing villages and continued its work. Later the Burma Army took five protesters, later releasing them. Some were beaten and slapped. SMEC is the public face of a consortium planning the dam. Its task, conducting the Environmental and Social Impact Assessments (EIAs and SIAs), takes it into potentially affected villages. SMEC finds itself heroically taking one for the gang: the disaster-prone Three Gorges Corporation; Sinohydro, which has been involved in several controversial dam projects in the past; the Myanmar Electricity Power Enterprise; and state energy monopsony Thai Electricity Generating Authority. There are rumours that a UK team of engineers, Malcolm Dunstan and Associates —involved in dam building in Myanmar in the past and, because of human-rights violations on the sites, placed on the UK Burma Campaign’s ‘Dirty Company’ list— might also be involved, but those could not be substantiated. SMEC has been meeting the people of Shan state, seeking agreement to build the Tasang dam at Mong Ton. It has faced serial rejection (a story detailing that rejection, with a critique of SMEC’s procedures, was removed from Asian Correspondent after legal threats from SMEC). Meetings have been cancelled due to local hostility. Shan women have risen to their feet, their voices rich and challenging, telling the SMEC representatives that, having survived years of war, they refuse to let their ancestral lands be drowned to produce unneeded electricity for China and Thailand..."
Author/creator: Melody Kemp
Language: English
Format/size: pdf (171K)
Date of entry/update: 31 January 2016


Title: Thai, Burmese Villagers Fear Secretive Salween Dam Project
Date of publication: 05 December 2014
Description/subject: "...Sob Moei is located 47 kms (30 miles) upstream from the site of the long-planned 1,360-megawatt Hatgyi dam in Burma. Environmental activists say Hatgyi, aimed at harnessing the power of the Salween, Southeast Asia’s second longest river, could displace thousands of people, block fish migration routes and reduce the food and jobs on which riverine people depend. Communities in the area are already marginalized—many are poor, uneducated ethnic and religious minorities living in remote places. General Baw Kyaw Heh, KNLA’s vice chief of staff, has said the Burmese troop deployment to the area threatens to derail peace negotiations between the government and ethnic armed groups. Burmese also object to the fact that most of the electricity to be generated will go to Thailand, leaving little for energy-starved Burma. Hatgyi is being developed jointly by Chinese, Thai and Burmese investors, including the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT) and IGE, a Burmese company dealing in timber, oil, gas and mining..."
Author/creator: Thin Lei Win, rEITERS
Language: English
Source/publisher: "The Irrawaddy"
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 05 December 2014


Title: Karen Army Leader Links Current Fighting To Burma Government’s Mega Development Projects
Date of publication: 24 October 2014
Description/subject: General Ner Dah Bo Mya, the head of the Karen National Defence Organisation told Karen News that armed conflict this month in Burma is linked to plans to build hydropower dams on the Salween River. In an exclusive interview General Ner Dah explains to Karen News why he has placed his troops are on high alert. General Ner Dah said that fighting between the government’s militia, the Border guard Force and the Democratic Karen Benevolent Army (DKBA) has sent warning signals to the Karen armed groups that the government is planning to reinforce it military in the region. “The current situation that we have in our area right now is that we have to be alert because there are fighting between BGF and the DKBA. We have to be alert because we can see that the Burmese [army] are reinforcing their military in most of their base camps that are also close to our base camps.” General Ner Dah said that his organization is aware that the government intends to clamp down on any opposition to its plans to build ‘development projects’ in Karen State...
Language: English
Source/publisher: Karen News
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 30 October 2014


Title: Negative impacts of dam building and drug use in Paingkyon and Nabu townships, Hpa-an District, May 2014
Date of publication: 14 July 2014
Description/subject: This News Bulletin describes concerns raised by villagers In Paingkyon and Nabu townships regarding the planned construction of a dam, logging activities, problems related to increased drug use in local communities and the lack of a complaints mechanism by which to raise these concerns with leaders of local armed actors. Villagers living near the site of a proposed hydroelectric dam on the Pa Ta River have raised serious concerns regarding the project’s potentially huge environmental and other impacts, and say they have not been properly informed or consulted about the plans. They fear that if construction of the dam goes ahead, homes, land vital for livelihoods and religious sites will be destroyed, affecting approximately 40 villages. Villagers also reported that the wide spread sale and use of drugs has led to a number of problems, such as addiction and mental health issues, poverty and drug related violence. In response, thousands of villagers held consultation meetings and launched a petition calling on the leaders of local armed actors to work together to address their concerns.
Language: English
Source/publisher: Karen Human Rights Group (KHRG)
Format/size: html, pdf (597K text; 2.7MB map)
Alternate URLs: http://www.khrg.org/sites/default/files/14-4-nb1_wb_2.pdf
http://www.khrg.org/sites/default/files/pata_dam_construction_locaston_0.pdf
http://www.burmalibrary.org/KHRG/KHRG%202014/KHRG-2014-07-14-Negative_impacts_of_dam_building_%20Na...
http://www.burmalibrary.org/KHRG/KHRG%202014/KHRG-2014-07-14-Negative_impacts_of_dam_building_%20Na...
Date of entry/update: 05 December 2014


Title: Hatgyi Dam update and consultation concerns, December 2011 to May 2013
Date of publication: 27 June 2014
Description/subject: This News Bulletin provides an update on the Hatgyi Dam{Utgyi Dam}project in Bu Tho Township, Hpapun District between December 2011 and May 2013. During this period, the company in charge of the dam’s construction held consultation meetings with the affected community to explain the benefits of the project, such as the provision of electricity generated by hydro-power, but also explained that approximately 300 or 400 villagers in certain areas would need to be relocated due to the flooding that would occur during construction. This bulletin highlights local concerns related to the consultation process carried out by the company. In one meeting that had been facilitated by a local Border Guard Force commander, a presentation about the project was delivered by representatives from the dam construction company in Burmese, which could not be fully understood by the Karen-speaking attendees. One villager also stated that, if necessary, they would relocate downriver of the dam in Hpa-an District, while the company designated a different area in Bago town for relocation. Villagers reported that they felt they could not oppose the KNU’s approval of the project, while the BGF commander informed KHRG that the consent of the local community is necessary.
Language: English
Source/publisher: Karen Human Rights Group (KHRG)
Format/size: html, pdf (690K)
Alternate URLs: http://www.khrg.org/sites/default/files/13-7-nb1_pdf.pdf
http://www.burmalibrary.org/KHRG/KHRG%202014/KHRG-2014-06-27-Hatgyi_Dam_update_and_consultation_con...
Date of entry/update: 08 December 2014


Title: Current Status of Dam Projects on Burma’s Salween River
Date of publication: 13 March 2013
Description/subject: "In late February 2013, Burma’s Deputy Minister of Electric Power informed Parliament that six dam projects on the Salween River in Shan State, Kayah State (Karenni) and Karen State had gained approval. With a combined installed capacity of 15,000 MW, the projects will include the Upper Salween or Kunlong Dam, Mai Tong or Tasang Dam, Nong Pha Dam, Mantawng Dam (on a tributary), Ywathit Dam, and Hatgyi Dam. The investment will come from five Chinese corporations, Thailand’s Electricity Generation Authority of Thailand (EGAT) International Co. Ltd and three Burmese corporations. Originating in the Tibetan Himalayas, the Salween River fl ows for 2,800 kilometers through China’s Yunnan province, into Burma and Thailand, and down to the Andaman Sea. One of the last largely Current Status of Dam Projects on Burma’s Salween River free- fl owing rivers in the world, the Salween River boasts one of the richest ecological hubs in the region and is home to at least 13 indigenous groups including the Nu, Lisu, Shan, Karen, Pa-o, Karenni and Mon. Over the past decade, numerous dam projects have been planned on the Salween River: thirteen in the upper reaches of the Salween in China, and six along the lower reaches in Burma and along the Thailand-Burma border. The projects in Burma are proceeding in areas where conflict is continuing between ethnic resistance forces and the Burmese Army, and are shrouded in secrecy. Salween Watch has compiled available information about these projects in this brief update..."
Language: English, Thai
Source/publisher: Salween Watch
Format/size: pdf (609K-English; 718K-Thai)
Alternate URLs: http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs15/salween_dams-2013-03-th-red.pdf
Date of entry/update: 24 March 2013


Title: Water Grabbing/Land Grabbing in Shared Water Basins: The Case of Salween River Hatgyi Dam
Date of publication: 2013
Description/subject: Abstract: "Land grabbing by foreign governments and international companies is on the rise. Faced by population growth and an ever-decreasing availability of useable/affordable land in populace states, many are looking to buy land where it is available, predominantly for agricultural and industrial purposes. But land alone is not sufficient for either of these uses. The availability of useable water resources is also a prerequisite to each land purchase. To buy land is to own its green water and have access to any blue water available to it. The development of hydropower projects, however, endeavours to buy the use of blue water, and must also come with a purchase/lease of the surrounding lands. Thus, it can also be seen as a type of ‘water grabbing’. Where the locally affected, vulnerable, pre-existing stakeholders are against the project and the loss of livelihood and rights it engenders, a hydropower project may be labelled as a vehicle for water and land grabbing. For an international river, a part of a shared basin, the water grabbing affects stakeholders living under various political regimes and with disparate local power relations. The effects of the project on both sides of a border may be the same; however, the manner in which the two governments handle the effects will be different. The Case of the Hatgyi Dam development on the Salween River, a joint project between China, Myanmar and Thailand, is an example of the above. As a controversial dam being built on an international, border river, the Hatgyi Dam case study exemplifies many of the issues to be found in similar developments across the developing world."
Author/creator: E. Zerrouk
Language: English
Source/publisher: Journal of Water Resources and Ocean Science. Vol. 2, No. 5, 2013, pp. 68-78
Format/size: pdf (403K-original)
Alternate URLs: http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs21/JWROS-2013-Water_Grabbing-Land_Grabbing-in_Shared_Water_Basins-e...
Date of entry/update: 29 February 2016


Title: Karenni people oppose new Salween dam plans by SPDC and Chinese investors
Date of publication: 09 August 2010
Description/subject: Statement by the Karenni Development Research Group (KDRG) Karenni people oppose new Salween dam plans by SPDC and Chinese investors
Language: Burmese, English
Source/publisher: Burma Rivers Network
Format/size: pdf (28.46 KB)
Alternate URLs: http://www.burmariversnetwork.org/burmese/images/stories/petition-press-release/KDRG%20statement%20...
Date of entry/update: 20 September 2010


Title: Stop the Dam Offensive Against the Karenni
Date of publication: 2010
Description/subject: "The Karenni, one of Burma’s main ethnic groups, have been suffering for over half a century from military aggression and abuses by successive ruling juntas. Now they are facing a new threat: the damming of rivers across their state by Chinese investors. In January 2010, the state-owned Datang Corporation of China signed a Memorandum of Understanding with Burma’s regime to build three dams in Karenni State, including a 600 Megawatt dam on the mainstream Salween, and two others on its tributaries, the Pawn and Thabet rivers. Plans by Chinese and Thai companies to build dams on the Salween in Burma have been highly controversial for years for their human costs and potential environmental impact. The seven planned dams are all sited in confl ict zones; dam workers have been killed by land mines and artillery. Military offensives in the area of the southernmost planned dam have recently caused thousands of refugees to fl ee to Thailand. In Karenni State, engineers guarded by armed soldiers are currently surveying for both the Ywathit Dam on the Salween and the Pawn River Dam. The Pawn Dam is likely to be built fi rst to power construction at Ywathit and will be devastating for the Yintale people who live along the Pawn River and now number just 1,000..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Karenni Development Research Group (KDRG)
Format/size: pdf (1.4MB-reduced version; 2MB-original)
Alternate URLs: http://burmariversnetwork.org/images/stories/publications/english/KarenniBriefer%20-%20English.pdf
http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs21/KDRG-2010-Stop_the_Dam_Offensive_Against_the_Karenni-en.pdf
Date of entry/update: 29 February 2016


Title: Stop the Dam Offensive Against the Karenni (Burmese ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Date of publication: 2010
Description/subject: "The Karenni, one of Burma’s main ethnic groups, have been suffering for over half a century from military aggression and abuses by successive ruling juntas. Now they are facing a new threat: the damming of rivers across their state by Chinese investors. In January 2010, the state-owned Datang Corporation of China signed a Memorandum of Understanding with Burma’s regime to build three dams in Karenni State, including a 600 Megawatt dam on the mainstream Salween, and two others on its tributaries, the Pawn and Thabet rivers. Plans by Chinese and Thai companies to build dams on the Salween in Burma have been highly controversial for years for their human costs and potential environmental impact. The seven planned dams are all sited in confl ict zones; dam workers have been killed by land mines and artillery. Military offensives in the area of the southernmost planned dam have recently caused thousands of refugees to fl ee to Thailand. In Karenni State, engineers guarded by armed soldiers are currently surveying for both the Ywathit Dam on the Salween and the Pawn River Dam. The Pawn Dam is likely to be built fi rst to power construction at Ywathit and will be devastating for the Yintale people who live along the Pawn River and now number just 1,000..."
Language: Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: Karenni Development Research Group (KDRG)
Format/size: pdf (1.3MB-reduced version; 1.8MB-original)
Alternate URLs: http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs21/KDRG-2010-Stop_the_Dam_Offensive_Against_the_Karenni-red-bu.pdf
http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs21/KDRG-2010-Stop_the_Dam_Offensive_Against_the_Karenni-bu.pdf
Date of entry/update: 29 February 2016


Title: Roots and Resilience - Tasang dam threatens war-torn Shan communities
Date of publication: July 2009
Description/subject: 'The report “Roots and Resilience” by the Shan Sapawa Environment Organization focuses on the ecologically unique area of Keng Kham, a community of 15,000 that was forcibly relocated over ten years ago; the majority have fled to Thailand. Today the estimated 3,000 that remain are managing to maintain their livelihoods and culture despite the constant threats of the Burma Army and the impending Tasang dam. Indigenous Shan cultural practices, river-fed farms, sacred cave temples and pristine waterfalls are depicted in photos from this isolated war-zone, together with updated information about the dam project, which has been shrouded in secrecy. The 7,110 MW Tasang Dam is the biggest of five dams planned on the Salween River; the majority of the power from the dam will be sold to Thailand. Project investors include the Thai MDX Company and China’s Gezhouba Group Company. Thailand’s support for the controversial dam was recently reiterated when the project was included in its national Power Development Plan. Military tension has escalated in recent months in Shan State as the Burmese regime has been putting pressure on the United Wa State Army to transform into a “Border Guard Force.” Abuses linked to anti-insurgency campaigns are also on the rise.'
Language: English, Thai
Source/publisher: Shan Sapawa Environmental Organization
Format/size: pdf (1.8-reduced version, 4.68MB-original- English; 6.58MB - Thai)
Alternate URLs: http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs21/SSEO-2009-Roots_and_Resilience-Tasang_Dam_Threatens_War-Torn_Sha...
http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs21/SSEO-2009-Roots_and_Resilience-Tasang_Dam_Threatens_War-Torn_Sha...
http://salweenwatch.org/images/PDF/rootsandresiliencethai.pdf
Date of entry/update: 05 October 2009


Title: KungLong Dam (Upper Thanlwin Dam)
Date of publication: 18 August 2008
Description/subject: Dam specifications | Companies Involved | Finance | Project Status | Impacts | EIA....."The Upper Thanlwin Dam is one of five dams planned on the Salween River in eastern Burma. In April 2007, two Chinese companies signed an MOU with the Burmese government for an “Upper Thanlwin” dam in northern Shan State..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Burma Rivers Watch
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 05 August 2015


Title: Mong Tom Dam(Tasang Dam)
Date of publication: 2008
Description/subject: The Tasang Dam is the biggest of the five proposed for the Salween River. If built it will be the highest dam in Southeast Asia, taller than China’s massive Three Gorges Dam. Burma’s military regime initially signed deals with Thailand’s MDX Group for implementation of the Tasang Dam in Shan State. Amidst rumors of dissatisfaction with MDX, the China Gezhouba Group Co. won a contract for initial dam construction in early 2007. In mid-2008, Sinohydro, China Southern Power Grid Co., and China Three Gorges Project Corporation signed an agreement for the development of the Salween River Basin in Burma, mentioning the Tasang Dam in particular.{highslide type="img" url="maps/salweendams.jpg" width=150 display=none} [Click to enlarge the map] Click to enlarge the map {/highslide} Dam Specifications Height: 228 meters Installed capacity: 7,110 MW Annual production: 35,446 Ghw Location: Mong Ton township, Northern Shan Stat...."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Burma Rivers Network
Format/size: html, pdf
Date of entry/update: 05 August 2015


Title: In the Balance: Salween dams threaten downstream communities in Burma
Date of publication: May 2007
Description/subject: Summary: " The Salween is Southeast Asia's longest free flowing river and one of Burma's most important waterways. For the half a million people living where the river meets the Andaman Sea, the Salween is a way of life interlinked with its seasonal flows and daily tides. However, Burma's military dictatorship, together with Thai and Chinese investors, is moving ahead with plans to dam the Salween. The communities living downstream have not been informed or consulted about the dam plans or their potential impacts, even though their lives stand to be permanently altered. This report describes the unique geography and ecology of the downstream estuary, where salt water meets fresh and the mainstream Salween and its two main tributaries are tidal for up to 75 kilometers inland. Numerous islands, some of them seasonal and some of them culturally sacred, are rich with fertile sediment that flows down the Salween each year. The delicate mix of salt and fresh water created by the seasonal flow of the river and the rise and fall of the tides determines daily life. Local people collect fresh water at high tide and store it in community pools for drinking and household use, and manage a system of canals to irrigate fields with fresh water and protect crops from salt water. In this way, villages subsist and provide farm produce to the capital city of Mon State and the five townships at the mouth of the Salween. Natural seasonal floods irrigate and replenish fields, and support the migration of fish species that use flooded habitats as spawning grounds before returning to the sea. Fisher folk carefully follow the migration patterns of countless species to make their catch and provide fish paste, one of the essential ingredients of Mon food. Wild plants that grow in the unique mix of salt and fresh water of the estuary are used as medicines and food. If the dams are built, the downstream effects, as studied elsewhere in the world, stand to alter the lives of over half a million people. These effects include altered river flows that cause higher concentrations of salt water to travel further inland. Changes in water quality, salinity, or seasonal flows are likely to make community water pools undrinkable and affect agricultural crops. Sudden and unnatural water surges increase erosion, destroy islands, and make the river dangerous to local communities. In addition, the decreased amount of sediment reaching downstream damages agriculture. A decline in fish catches due to interrupted migrations will impact the protein source of the local diet. Any one of these changes to the river would tip the balance fine-tuned over generations between self-reliant communities and their environment. Lastly, the proposed dams lie on active earthquake fault lines; dam breaks would be a disaster. Yet, despite all these concerns and potential problems, those living downstream have not even been informed of the project and unknown to them, their future is left hanging in the balance. The suppression of free media and arrests, beatings, and extra-judicial killings of anyone that challenges the regime in Burma make it impossible to access adequate information or to question the projects. Any dam project needs to take into consideration the social and environmental impacts on those living downstream and, most importantly, allow for their informed consent. This is impossible under the military dictatorship in Burma. The Mon Youth Progressive Organization therefore calls on all parties to halt their investments and stop the Salween dam projects."
Language: English, Burmese, Thai, Chinese.
Source/publisher: Mon Youth Progressive Organization
Format/size: pdf (English, 623K-reduced version, 743K-original; Burmese, 1MB-reduced version, 1.2MB-original; Thai, 920K-reduced version; 1MB-original; Chinese, 83K)
Alternate URLs: http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs21/MYPO-2007-05-In-the-Balance-Salween_dams_threaten_downstream_com...
http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs21/MYPO-2007-05-In-the-Balance-Salween_dams_threaten_downstream_com...
http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs21/MYPO-2007-05-In-the-Balance-Salween_dams_threaten_downstream_com...
http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs21/MYPO-2007-05-In-the-Balance-Salween_dams_threaten_downstream_com...
http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs21/MYPO-2007-05-In-the-Balance-Salween_dams_threaten_downstream_com...
http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs21/MYPO-2007-05-In-the-Balance-Salween_dams_threaten_downstream_com...
http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs21/MYPO-2007-05-In-the-Balance-Salween_dams_threaten_downstream_com...
http://www.burmariversnetwork.org/images/stories/publications/burmese/inthebalanceburmese.pdf (Burmese)
http://www.burmariversnetwork.org/images/stories/publications/thai/inthebalancethai.pdf (Thai)
http://www.burmariversnetwork.org/images/stories/publications/chinese/in_the_balance_cn_final.pdf (Chinese)
Date of entry/update: 07 May 2007


Title: Salween - Extracts from WWF Rivers report, 2007
Date of publication: 22 March 2007
Description/subject: "The Salween river basin is more than twice the size of England, the second largest river basin in southeast Asia and one of the last free-flowing international rivers in Asia..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: WWF
Format/size: pdf (38K)
Date of entry/update: 22 March 2007


Title: Warning Signs - An update on plans to dam the Salween in Burmas Shan State
Date of publication: 15 September 2006
Description/subject: A new report “Warning Signs: An update on plans to dam the Salween in Burmas Shan State” by the Shan Sapawa Organization launched today details how preparations for a giant hydropower dam at Tasang on the Salween River in southern Shan State have been continuing. Among the four dams being planned on the Salween River, preparations for the Tasang Dam, 130 kms north of Chiang Mai, are the most advanced. The report, reveals how, despite a dearth of public information about the dam plans, the Thai contracting company MDX has been building roads, staff buildings and local power generating facilities near the site of the 228-meter-high dam, which will have the largest installed capacity as well as being the tallest in Southeast Asia. The dam site is located in the main area of conflict in Shan State. In the past ten years, the Burma Army has tripled the number of battalions around Tasang, and over 60,000 villagers have been forcibly relocated from areas adjoining the dam site and the projected flood zone. Villagers found in hiding have been tortured, raped and killed. The majority have fled to Thailand. In lieu of consultation with the remaining villagers in the flood zone, MDX have simply been hiring doctors to provide health services to villagers south of the dam-site along the proposed route of the electricity transmission lines to Thailand. MDX signed a Memorandum of Agreement with the Burmese Department of Hydroelectric Power in April 2006 for joint development of a 7,110 megawatt dam at Tasang at an estimated cost of US$6 billion. Sapawa is urging an immediate end to the Tasang dam project. “We want the Thai government and Thai investors to stop supporting a project which will permanently displace thousands of our people, including Shan refugees in Thailand who will have no home to return to,” said Sapawa spokesperson Sai Sai.
Language: English
Source/publisher: Shan Sapawa Environmental organisation (Sapawa) via Burma Rivers Network
Format/size: pdf (731K-reduced version; 884K-original)
Alternate URLs: http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs21/Sapawa-2006-Warning_Signs-An_Update_on_Plans_to_Dam-the_Salween_...
http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs21/Sapawa-2006-Warning_Signs-An_Update_on_Plans_to_Dam-the_Salween_...
Date of entry/update: 21 September 2006


Title: Dammed by Burma's Generals -- The Karenni Experience with Hydropower Development, from Lawpita to the Salween
Date of publication: 14 March 2006
Description/subject: " Threatened with plans by Burma’s generals to dam the Salween River and submerge vast tracts of their homelands, the Karenni are releasing a new report today which exposes the parallels between the devastating impacts of Burma’s first large scale hydropower project, built in their state, and those of the planned Salween dams. The report highlights the destructive mix of development and military rule in Burma. The report by the Karenni Development Research Group (KDRG), Dammed by Burma’s Generals, chronicles the impacts of the Lawpita hydropower project since the early 1960s. Promised abundant electricity and irrigation, the local population instead suffered from forced displacement, water shortages, increased militarization, human rights abuses, and thousands of landmines planted to secure the project. Most of the power was sent directly to Rangoon; still today 80% of the Karenni are without electricity. One of four dams planned for the Salween, the Weigyi Dam, will flood over 640 square kilometers in Karenni State, submerging an area three times the size of the Lawpita reservoir. The report details how twenty-eight towns and villages, including a historical capital of the Karenni, will be inundated, impacting approximately 30,000 people. An entire tribe – the Yintalai, who now number a mere 1,000 – will permanently lose all their homelands. Irreversible environmental damage will be caused by inundation of forests internationally recognized for their outstanding biodiversity. Under an agreement signed in December 2005 between Thailand and Burma’s regime, construction on the Salween dams is slated to begin in 2007. With likely investment from China, the dams will provide electricity for Thailand and revenue for the ruling military regime. As Pascal Khoo Thwe, the Karenni author of From the Land of Green Ghosts says in his foreword to the report: “There is no better way to destroy a country than by the combined power of bulldozers and guns.” Civil war continues in Karenni State, leaving an estimated one third of the population internally displaced and over 22,000 Karenni refugees registered in camps in Thailand. If the Salween dams go ahead, many of these people will never be able to return home. The report urges that the Salween dam projects be scrapped. As KDRG researcher Aung Ngeh states: “We know from bitter experience what hydropower development means under a military dictatorship. It is not about electricity or irrigation for the people. It is about subjugation and control. The Salween dams will mean more soldiers, more landmines, and the gradual annihilation of our people.”"
Language: English
Source/publisher: Karenni Development Research Group
Format/size: pdf (2.64MB) 80 pages
Alternate URLs: http://www.salweenwatch.org/downloads/Dammed.pdf
Date of entry/update: 14 March 2006


Title: Eine kostbare Ressource mit Konfliktpotential
Date of publication: 01 January 2006
Description/subject: Wasser in Südostasien, Konflikte um Wassernutzung, Pak Mun Staudamm, Nam Theun II Damm, Salween Staudammprojekt; Water in Southeast Asia, Salween Dam
Author/creator: Yvonne Klöpper
Language: Deutsch, German
Source/publisher: Südostasien Informationsstelle Asienhaus
Format/size: Pdf/ 2708K
Date of entry/update: 10 August 2006


Title: Flooding the Future: Hydropower and Cultural Survival in the Salween River Basin
Date of publication: 02 May 2005
Description/subject: "...After years of speculation, the Royal Thai Government and the State Peace and Development Council (SPDC), the military regime ruling Burma, appear poised to begin major construction on a series of large hydro-powered dams in the Salween River basin. In April 2004, Thailand’s Energy Ministry and Burma’s Ministry of Electric Power agreed to develop four of the proposed projects. Joint feasibility studies began this past fall, prompting representatives from several different Burmese ethnic groups to urge Thailand to reconsider. Their concerns emphasized the environmental costs of these dams and the fact that electricity produced from them would be exported abroad instead of supplying local populations who endure serious energy shortages.Their pleas appear to have fallen on deaf ears. Fortunately, the arrest of Khin Nyunt in October 2004 has fomented rather than ended the power struggle between different factions within the SPDC. As a result, the ongoing political turmoil inside the country has created a brief window of opportunity. But constructive action is needed quickly...While hydropower projects have brought economic benefits, they have also adversely affected millions of people worldwide who depend upon rivers for their survival. These projects have irreversibly damaged ecosystems and led to the loss of livelihoods, cultures, and the rights of populations displaced by dams. All of the dam projects proposed for the Salween River basin in Burma fail to meet the standards established by the World Commission in Dams, particularly those related to open and transparent decision-making.27 In every instance, advocates for the dams have failed to include the affected communities in the decision-making process, which raises concerns that profits are again being put before local interests and needs. The projects also fail to meet the basic principle of distributive justice, which is embedded in the notion of sustainable development and other rights-based approaches. Sustainability, according to the 1980 World Commission on Environment and Development, cannot be achieved if policies do not consider the ramifications of resource accessibility and the equitable distribution of benefits and burdens across all affected stakeholders, including non-human ones.28 Current conditions inside Burma do not permit any of the above principles to be honored. For these reasons, further construction should be halted until other, less destructive options, can be explored, discussed, and agreed upon by all the stakeholders..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: EarthRights International
Format/size: html (104K)
Date of entry/update: 03 May 2005


Title: Damming at Gunpoint (Burmese)
Date of publication: November 2004
Description/subject: BURMA ARMY ATROCITIES PAVE THE WAY FOR SALWEEN DAMS IN KAREN STATE... "As Thailand proceeds with plans to join Burma’s military regime in building a series of dams on the Salween River to gain “cheap” electricity, this report reveals the atrocities being inflicted on the people of Northern Karen State to pave the way for two of the planned dams. The Upper Salween (Wei Gyi) Dam and Lower Salween (Dar Gwin) Dam are planned to be built on the river where it forms the border between Thailand’s Mae Hong Son province and Burma’s Karen State. Together they will produce about 5,300 MW of electricity. It is estimated that the reservoir for the Upper Dam will stretch for 380 kilometers inside Karen and Karenni States of Burma. Both dams are located at the eastern edge of Papun district in Karen State. Once a Karen liberated area, during the last decade Papun has been the site of repeated military offensives and anti-insurgency campaigns by the regime’s troops to crush the Karen resistance. Before 1992, there were only ten Burma Army garrisons in Papun district. Today there are fifty-four garrisons, including twelve along the Salween river bank, fortified with heavy artillery. The military campaigns have decimated the local population. 210 villages have been destroyed, and villagers forcibly relocated to 31 relocation sites, where movement has been strictly controlled, and villagers are subject to forced labour and other human rights abuses. Tens of thousands of villagers have fled to Thailand as refugees; others live in hiding in the jungle, where they live in constant fear of being found and tortured or killed. In 1992, there were estimated to be about 107,000 people in Papun district. Now this has been halved to about 54,000, of whom about 35,000, or 60%, are internally displaced in the jungles. The rest have fled to Thailand or other parts of Burma. Out of 85 original villages in the mountainous area of Eastern Papun directly adjoining the planned dam sites, only a quarter remain. Most of the communities who had farmed and traded along the Salween River have fled to Thailand, and many farms in the fertile tributary valleys have been lying fallow for over a decade. Over 5,000 villagers remain hiding in the jungle, facing severe food shortages and health problems. Roads to the planned dam sites have been built using forced labour, and landmines have been planted alongside the roads. There has been no consultation with local communities about the dam plans. If the dams are built, the floodwaters will permanently displace many of the communities currently in hiding or living as refugees in Thailand. The increased military security for the dam sites will also inevitably mean further abuses against local populations. The Salween dams fit into the ongoing strategy of the Burmese military regime to use “development” projects to gain funding and collusion from neighbouring countries to subjugate ethnic resistance movements, and exploit the natural resources in the ethnic areas. Karen Rivers Watch makes the following recommendations:..."
Language: Burmese
Source/publisher: Karen Rivers Watch
Format/size: pdf (1.4MB - OBL version; 3.23MB - original)
Alternate URLs: http://www.burmariversnetwork.org/images/stories/publications/burmese/dammingatgunpoint.pdf
Date of entry/update: 23 February 2012


Title: The Salween Under Threat: Damming the Longest Free River in Southeast Asia
Date of publication: October 2004
Description/subject: CHAPTER 1: Livelihoods and Ecosystems along the Salween; CHAPTER 2: Politics and Power Behind Dam Building; CHAPTER 3: Conditions in Burma; CHAPTER 4: Tasang Dam: CHAPTER 5: Wei Gyi and Dagwin Dams: CHAPTER 6: Salween Water Diversion Projects; CHAPTER 7: Avoiding Tragedy..."...This book calls for efforts to prevent destructive large scale hydro-power development on the Salween, and also to find low-impact models of development that can ensure a rising standard of living for the communities it supports. Our hope is that the international community will support the campaign to protect the Salween and its peoples in both Thailand and Burma...Among the major river systems in mainland Southeast Asia, the dam-building industry has successfully promoted construction of numerous dams on the Mekong River and its tributaries, causing the destruction of the environment and loss of livelihoods for millions of people. By contrast, the Salween River, which like the Mekong originates in the Himalayas and runs parallel to the Mekong for several hundred miles, remains the longest river in mainland Southeast Asia that flows freely, uninterrupted by dams. 3 This does not mean that the Salween River has been free from efforts to construct dams in its basin. In fact, hydro-power developers and dam builders from countries such as Japan, China, Australia, and Thailand have long been attracted to the Salween River basin, along with public institutions that have a history of financing hydro-power development and dam construction such as the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank (ADB), and the Japan Bank for International Cooperation (JBIC). Feasibility studies already have been conducted at many sites, and the promoters of the dams are geared to start construction at any moment without either consulting the local peoples or considering the social and environmental impacts the dams will have. If current trends continue, it is only a matter of time before the Salween will forever cease to flow freely. As with dam building in any other part of the world, the drive behind the plans to build dams on the Salween River does not necessarily stem from the quest for social or public welfare. While hydro-power may generate needed electricity, much of the push to dam comes from the ambitions of dam builders who stand to benefit from the consultancies, provision of equipment and building contracts. Chapter 2 examines the political and economic motives behind the plans to dam the Salween River. Dams’ Harmful Impacts Construction of large dams in any part of the world is known to inflict severe, negative effects on the environment and the livelihoods of the local people, and the planned dam and diversion projects in the Salween River system are no exception. Moreover, the current situation in Burma will certainly further aggravate such impacts for those communities living in the project areas in Burma. Chapters 1 and 3 describe the situation along the Salween where the dams are proposed. Given the negative impacts that are certain to occur, alternative energy and water management options should be considered before final decisions are made to dam the Salween River. Chapter 7 examines the alternative options that are available, and presents recommendations to the international community..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Salween Watch, Southeast Asia Rivers Network, Center for Social Development Studies, Chulalongkorn University
Format/size: pdf (1.9MB)
Date of entry/update: 16 December 2004


Title: Verbrannte Erde und Überflutungen: Staudammprojekte am Salween in Burma
Date of publication: October 2003
Description/subject: Ein Artikel über die Aktivitäten der ADB in Burma, Staudammprojekte am Salween, Umweltkatastrophen, ölkologische Folgen der Staudammprojekte. activities of the ADB concerning Burma; environmental, ecological and sicial consequences of dam-projects
Author/creator: Daniel Apolinarski
Language: Deutsch, German
Source/publisher: Burma Initiative Asienhaus
Format/size: pdf (99K)
Date of entry/update: 05 December 2003


Title: Fatally flawed - The Tasang Dam on the Salween River
Date of publication: 07 May 2003
Description/subject: "Far from the public spotlight in northeast Burma lies Shan State, home to indigenous groups, diverse forests and animals, and Southeast Asia’s longest undammed river, the Salween. In this remote zone of civil war and conflict over resources, the Burmese military and an energy company from Thailand are developing the Tasang Dam, slated to be the tallest dam in Southeast Asia. Given the Burmese regime’s predilection for violence and disregard for human rights and environmental standards, the Tasang Dam, if built, would provoke forced labor, forced relocations, environmental destruction, and suppression of dissent. To date, public participation has been absent surrounding the project, and forced labor and portering have already been linked to the project and its security. The Tasang Dam project would be not only destructive but entirely unnecessary, a boondoggle that would benefit the Burmese generals and a few private companies while doing nothing to provide for the needs and aspirations of the people of Burma or Thailand. An inspiring resistance to the Tasang Dam in Burma is active, if underground, despite the notorious repression of the Burmese military regime. It is not too late to stop the Tasang Dam. It is not to late to save the Salween..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: EarthRights International
Format/size: pdf (460K)
Date of entry/update: 11 July 2012


Title: Tasang Dam Update (World Water Forum version)
Date of publication: March 2003
Description/subject: Current updates of hydroelectric power projects on the Salween River. Mainly based on wired reports in English.
Author/creator: Yuki Akimoto
Language: Japanese
Source/publisher: BurmaInfo
Format/size: html (20K), pdf (43K)
Alternate URLs: http://www.burmainfo.org/env/tasangupdate-3wwwf.html
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: Tasang Dam Update #2
Date of publication: 29 January 2003
Description/subject: Current updates of hydroelectric power projects on the Salween River. Mainly based on wired reports in English.
Author/creator: Yuki Akimoto
Language: Japanese
Source/publisher: BurmaInfo
Format/size: html
Alternate URLs: http://www.burmainfo.org (home page of publisher)
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: Tasang Dam Update #1
Date of publication: 23 December 2002
Description/subject: Current updates of hydroelectric power projects on the Salween River. Mainly based on wire reports in English.
Author/creator: Yuki Akimoto
Language: Japanese
Source/publisher: BurmaInfo
Format/size: html
Alternate URLs: http://www.ibiblio.org/obl/show.php?cat=2976&lo=d&sl=1
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: MDX plans dam on Salween
Date of publication: 13 December 2002
Description/subject: "MDX Plc, a local major construction group, is set to sign a memorandum of understanding with Rangoon for the construction of a 3,600-megawatt hydro-power dam on the Salween River..."
Author/creator: Yuthana Praiwan. Translator Tetz Hakoda (BurmaInfo)
Language: Japanese, English
Source/publisher: Bangkok Post (Business News)
Format/size: html, pdf
Alternate URLs: http://journal.probeinternational.org/2002/12/13/mdx-plans-dam-salween/
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: Zwangsumsiedlung für Staudammbau in Burma
Date of publication: December 2001
Description/subject: Für den Energieexport nach Thailand will Burmas Militärregierung einen Großstaudamm bauen, für den Tausende Angehörige der Shan umgesiedelt werden sollen. Der Tasang Staudamm soll am Fluss Salween im zentralen Shan Bundesstaat entstehen. Teile des Gebietes sind bereits entvölkert. Überblick der Geselschaft für bedrohte Völker über die Pläne zum Bau des Tasang-Staudamms und die Konsequenzen für die einheimische Bevölkerung und die Umwelt. key words: Tasang-dam, forced relocation, consequences for local population, environment
Language: Deutsch, German
Source/publisher: Gesellschaft für bedrohte Völker
Format/size: html (6,5K)
Alternate URLs: http://www.gfbv.de/fset_druck.php?doctype=inhaltsDok&docid=323
Date of entry/update: 08 January 2004