VL.png The World-Wide Web Virtual Library
[WWW VL database || WWW VL search]
donations.gif asia-wwwvl.gif

Online Burma/Myanmar Library

Full-Text Search | Database Search | What's New | Alphabetical List of Subjects | Main Library | Reading Room | Burma Press Summary

Home > Main Library > Economy > Industry > Extractive industries > Mining > Mining of iron and other metals

Order links by: Reverse Date Title

Mining of iron and other metals
Iron, tungsten (wolfram), molybdenum, titanium, platinum, antimony, chromite, nickel, tin etc

Individual Documents

Title: Maw Chee Mining Report (Karenni State)
Date of publication: 26 February 2016
Description/subject: A Free Burma Rangers (FBR) team travelled to the town of Maw Chee [Mawchi] to get information about the Burma Army and mining activities in that area. Mining operations in Maw Chee began at the time of the British occupation of Burma. Over the years it has increased with both Burmese and Chinese companies coming into this area to mine ore. Primarily the mines in the Maw Chee area extract tin...When looking at Maw Chee one can see scars all over the hill sides from where the mining operations have dumped debris and caused landslides. In October 2015, a large landslide killed 24 people when part of the mountain over Maw Chee came loose and destroyed 38 houses. This landslide was not directly linked to any one mine, but was caused by heavy rains and roadways built along the hillside. Myint Aung Hlaing came by helicopter, and the Burma Army – along with many other organizations – came to provide relief for the victims of the landslide..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Free Burma Rangers
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 26 February 2016


Title: Have the Wa Cornered the Global Tin Trade?
Date of publication: 25 February 2016
Description/subject: "A recent paper published in the journal "Resources Policy" concludes that a new tin mining operation located in a corner of northern Shan State controlled by the United Wa State Army (UWSA) appears to be responsible for elevating Burma in just a few years from being a bit player in the global tin industry “to the status of the World’s third largest tin producing country.” What the authors call a potential “black swan event” represents a 4900.00 percent increase in tin production over a five year period, from 2009 to 2014, according to figures provided by the UK based International Tin Research Institute (ITRI), a not for profit group with close ties to the mining industry..."
Author/creator: Seamus Martov
Language: English
Source/publisher: "The Irrawaddy"
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 29 February 2016


Title: Tin Mining in Myanmar: Production and Potential
Date of publication: 05 October 2015
Description/subject: "... In 2014, Myanmar(Burma)confounded industry analysts by emerging to become the World's third biggest tin producer, experiencing a 5-year tin production increase of ca.4900%. This surprise emergence of Myanmar as a major tin producer is a possible Black Swan event that potentially has significant re-percussions both for the future of global tin production, and for the economic development of Myanmar. This is a disruptive event that has likely contributed to a substantial drop in tin prices in 2015. The Myanmar production increase came from a new minesite in Wa State, and not from the traditional tin-producing areas in the South. We discuss tin mining and potential in Myanmar and consider whether it could provide a foundation for the economic rehabilitation of the country..."
Author/creator: Nicholas J. Gardiner, JohnP.Sykes, AllanTrench, LaurenceJ.Robb
Language: English
Source/publisher: Department of Earth Sciences, University of Oxford
Format/size: pdf (1.9MB)
Date of entry/update: 15 April 2016


Title: Chin urge transparency on Mwe Taung mining project
Date of publication: 20 September 2014
Description/subject: "Chin political parties and residents are calling for transparency over a Chinese-backed project, with some warning that the project could lead to a repeat of the unrest seen at the Letpadaung copper mine. Geological studies of the Mwe Taung Phar Taung area – on the border of Chin State’s Tiddim township and Sagaing Region’s Kale township – show three deposits of mixed nickel and iron capable of providing nearly 17,000 tonnes of pure nickel annually. A survey carried out by Chin political parties, civil societies and MPsfrom September 2 to 9, however, shows that many residents in the area are concerned about the potential impact on their businesses and the environment..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: "Myanmar Times"
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 21 December 2014


Title: Dawei Village to Sue Thai Mining Firm Over Environmental Impacts
Date of publication: 17 March 2014
Description/subject: "Villagers in Tenasserim Division’s Dawei District announced they will file a legal complaint against a Thai company and a Burmese government firm operating the Heinda tin mine, in order to seek compensation for severe environmental damage to their farmlands caused by the mine’s wastewater. In a press release Sunday, disseminated by US campaign group Earth Rights International, residents of Myaung Pyo village said they would complain to Dawei District Court over the operations of Thailand’s Myanmar Pongpipat Company and state-owned Mining Enterprise 2, which falls under the Ministry of Mining. The inhabitants of the ethnic Dawei village said their lands have been affected by increasing amounts of wastewater ever since Myanmar Pongpipat took over the Heinda mine. The Thai firm signed a production-sharing contract with Mining Enterprise 2 in 1999 and reportedly holds rights to 65 percent of produced tin and tungsten, which is transported to nearby Thailand for processing..."
Author/creator: Paul Vrieze
Language: English
Source/publisher: "The Irrawaddy"
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 21 December 2014


Title: Arakan State Govt Backs Mining Projects in Strife-Torn North
Date of publication: 07 October 2013
Description/subject: "A Chinese and a Luxembourg-registered firm have obtained Arakan State government approval to begin mining aluminum and titanium deposits located on beaches in the north of the state, said Arakan State Minister of Electricity and Industry Aung Than Tin. He added that final approval from Naypyidaw for the projects, which are located in strife-torn parts of the state, was expected soon..."
Author/creator: Nyein Nyein
Language: English
Source/publisher: "The Irrawaddy"
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 21 December 2014


Title: Karenni ceasefire fuels mining exploitation: NGOs
Date of publication: 07 October 2013
Description/subject: "Two Karenni NGOs have called on the Burmese government to suspend all mining licences issued since March 2012 for the eastern state until there is constitutional reform granting ethnic states the right to control and manage their own natural resources. In a joint-statement issued last week, the Molo Women Mining Watch Network and Karenni Civil Society Network (KCSN) strongly condemned the Burmese government’s practice of granting mining contracts in conflict zones in Karenni state. According to the groups, since the Karenni National Progressive Party signed a ceasefire with the Burmese government some 18 months ago, the number of mines in Karenni state has risen from three to 16. “Tin and tungsten mines in Mawchi mining town have been expanded, and new antimony, coal, galena and gold mines are being mined throughout Karenni state,” said the report.
Language: English
Source/publisher: Democratic Voice of Burma (DVB)
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 21 December 2014


Title: Dooplaya Situation Update: Kya In Seik Kyi Township, September 2012
Date of publication: 07 June 2013
Description/subject: This report includes a situation update submitted to KHRG in September 2012 by a community member describing events occurring in Dooplaya District, during September 2012. Specifically detailed is the situation and location of armed groups (Tatmadaw, DKBA and BGF); the villagers’ situation and opinions of the KNLA; and development projects in the area. This report also contains information about Tatmadaw practices such as the killing of villager’s livestock without permission or compensation; forcing villagers to be guides; and use of villagers’ tractors; villagers were however, given payment for this. The report also describes villagers’ difficulties associated with the payment of government-required motorbike licenses, as well as difficulties regarding the education system. The lack of healthcare in local villages is described, as well as the ailments that villagers suffer from. Further, this report includes information about antimony mining projects in the area carried out by companies such as San Mya Yadana Company and Thu Wana Myay Zi Lwar That Tuh Too Paw Yay owned by Hkin Zaw. Antimony mining is reported to have been going on for four years and the presence of mining companies is reported to have led to food price increases in the area. The community member describes how large mining companies have contributed water pipes and money to a village school. The biggest mining project in the region led by Hkin Maung is discussed and it is reported that mining companies working in the area have permission from the KNU and pay taxes to the KNU. This report and others, was published in March 2013 in Appendix 1: Raw Data Testimony of KHRG’s thematic report: Losing Ground: Land Conflicts and collective action in eastern Myanmar.
Language: English
Source/publisher: Karen Human Rights Group (KHRG)
Format/size: html, pdf (135K)
Alternate URLs: http://www.khrg.org/sites/default/files/khrg13b32.pdf
http://www.burmalibrary.org/KHRG/KHRG%202013/KHRG-2013-06-07-Dooplaya_Situation_Update_Kya_In_Seik_...
Date of entry/update: 27 July 2013


Title: Lost Paradise - Damaging Impact of Mawchi Tin Mines in Burma's Karenni State
Date of publication: 11 December 2012
Description/subject: This report documents the increased militarization around the Mawchi mines, as well as the different social and environmental impacts they have had on the local community...... 1. Introduction... 2. Ancestral lands and water sources to be lost from extension of Mawchi mines... 3. Tin production for export and domestic use... 4. Villagers suffer impacts of Heinda tin mine in Tenasserim... 5. Background history of Mawchi tin mine... 6. Timeline of Mawchi mines... 7. Relations between tin mining companies... 8. Military security for Mawchi mine... 9. Social impacts of tin mining: 9/1 . Health problems caused by tin mining; 9/2 . Pollution from mining waste; 9/3. Drinking water problems; 9/4. Health problems downstream from the mines; 9/5. Living conditions and safety of mine workers; 9/6 . Gender disparity... 10 . An old woman from the Mawchi area recounts her experience... 11 . Environmental impacts of tin mining: 11/1 . Deforestation; 11/2 . Landslides... 12 . Who benefits from tin mining?... 13. Conclusion and recommendations.
Language: English
Source/publisher: Molo Women Mining Watch Network
Format/size: pdf (490K-OBL version; 757K-original)
Alternate URLs: http://burmacampaign.org.uk/media/LostParadise-MawchiMining-English-.pdf
Date of entry/update: 17 December 2012


Title: Grab for white gold - platinum mining in Eastern Shan State (Burmese ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Date of publication: 08 May 2012
Description/subject: အစီရင္ခံစာအက်ဥ္းခ်ဳပ္ ရွမ္းျပည္နယ္ အေရွ႔ပိုင္း တာခ်ီလိတ္ၿမိဳ ၏႔ ေျမာက္ဖက္ ေတာင္တန္းေဒမ်ားတြင္ ေဒသခံမ်ားကို ထိခိုကေ္ စသည့္ ေရႊျဖဴတူးေဖာ္ျခင္းလုပ္ငန္းကို ၂၀၀၇ခုႏွစ္မွ စတင္ခဲ့ကာ ယင္းေၾကာင့္ လားဟူ၊ အာခါႏွင့္ ရွမ္းရြာ ၈ရြာမွာ လူေပါင္း ၂၀၀၀ေက်ာ္ကို ထိခိုက္ေစခဲ့သည္။ ေရႊျဖဴတူးေဖာ္မႈကို ျမန္မာကုမၸဏီမ်ားက ေဆာင္ရြက္ေနၿပီး တရုတ္ႏွင့္ ထုိင္းႏိုင္ငံသို႔ တင္ပို႔လွ်က္ရိွသည္။ တာခ်လီ တိ ၿ္မဳိ ႔ ေျမာကဖ္ က ္ ၁၃ကလီ မို တီ ာအကြာရ ွိအားရဲေခၚ အာခါရြာအနီးတငြ ္ကမု ဏၸ ၅ီ ခကု လပု င္ န္း လပု က္ ငို လ္ ်ွကရ္ သွိ ည။္ ထကို မု ဏၸ မီ ်ားက ရြာသားမ်ားပငို ဆ္ ငို သ္ ည ့္ပစညၥ ္းမ်ားႏငွ ့္ ေျမယာမ်ားက ိုအတင္းအက်ပဖ္ အိ ားေပး၍ ေစ်းႏမိွ ္ေရာင္းခ်ေစသကသဲ့ ႔ ို ေျမယာအခ်ိဳ က႔ ို ေလွ်ာ္ေၾကးမေပးဘဲ အဓမၼသိမး္ ယူ ခဲ့ၾကသည္။ ေထာင္ေပါင္းမ်ားစြာေသာ စိုက္ပိ်ဳးေျမဧကမ်ားႏွင့္ သစ္ေတာမ်ားကို ကုမၸဏီက သိမ္းယူေနၿပီး အခ်ိဳ႔ေသာေျမယာမ်ားသည္ သတၱဳတြင္းမွ အညစ္အေၾကးမ်ားစြန္႔ပစ္ေသာေၾကာင့္ ပ်ကဆ္ ီးလ်ွကရ္ သွိ ည။္ ရြာသရူ ြာသားမ်ား အသုံးျပဳသည ့္အေ၀းေျပးလမ္းသ ႔ိုသြားေရာကရ္ ာလမ္းမွာလည္း သတဳၱတူးေဖာသ္ ည ့္ ကုန္တင္ကားမ်ား၊ စက္ယႏၱယားႀကီးမ်ား ျဖတ္သန္းသြားျခင္းေၾကာင့္ ပ်က္ဆီးၾကရသည္။ သတဳၱတူးေဖာျ္ခင္းေၾကာင ့္ ရြာသားမ်ား အဓကိ အသုံးျပဳေနေသာ ေရအရင္းအျမစ ္ညစည္ မ္းလ်ွကရ္ ၿွိပီး ေရစီးေၾကာင္းမ်ားလည္း ေျပာင္းလဲကုန္သည္။ ယင္းအေျခအေနမ်ားက ေဒသခံအမ်ိဳးသမီးမ်ားကို ႀကီးမားေသာ အခက္အခဲမ်ားျဖစ္ေပၚေစသည္။ အေၾကာင္းမွာ ေရရရိွရန္အတြက္ အလြန္ေ၀းကြာေသာခရီးကို ေျခလ်င္ လမ္းေလွ်ာက္သြားရေသာေၾကာင့္ ျဖစ္သည္။ ထို႔အတူ သတၱဳတူးေဖာ္ရာလုပ္ငန္းသို႔ အမ်ိဳးသားေရႊ႔ေျပာင္းအလုပ္သမားမ်ား အစုလုိက္အၿပံဳလုိက္ ေရာက္ရိွ လာျခင္းေၾကာင့္ ထိုေနရာတ၀ိုက္တြင္ေနထိုင္သည့္ အမ်ိဳးသမီးမ်ား၏ လံုၿခံဳေရးမွာ အႏၱရာယ္ က်ေရာက္ လွ်က္ရိွသည္။ စိုက္ခင္းသို႔ သြားသည့္အမ်ိဳးသမီးမ်ားမွာ လိင္ပိုင္းဆုိင္ရာ ထိပါးေႏွာင့္ယွက္မႈမ်ားကို ႀကံဳေတြ႔ ေနရသည္။ အမ်ိဳးသမီးငယ္မ်ားမွာ သတၱဳတြင္းအလုပ္သမားမ်ား၏ မယားငယ္မ်ားအျဖစ္ သိမ္းယူခံရသကဲ့သို႔ အခ်ိဳ႔ အမ်ိဳးသမီးငယ္မ်ားမွာ ျပည္႔တန္ဆာမ်ား ျဖစ္ၾကရသည္။ သတၱဳတြင္း၀န္ထမ္းမ်ားက ေဒသခံ အမ်ိဳးသမီးငယ္မ်ားကို လူကုန္ကူးရာတြင္ ပါ၀င္ပတ္သက္ေနၾကသည္။ ရြာသ၊ူ ရြာသားမ်ား၏ အခငြ အ့္ ေရးက ိုကာကြယ္ေပးသည ့္ ဥပေဒစိုးမိုးမလႈ ည္း ကင္းမဲ့ေနသည။္ ျမနမ္ ာစစတ္ ပမ္ ွအရာရမွိ ်ားအား လာဘ္ထုိးျခင္းအားျဖင့္ သတၱဳတူးေဖာ္သည့္ ကုမၸဏီမ်ားသည္ လူမႈေရးႏွင့္ သဘာ၀ပတ္၀န္းက်င္ဆုိင္ရာ စံသတ္မွတ္ခ်က္မ်ားကို လိုက္နာရန္မလိုဘဲ လုပ္ငန္းလုပ္ကိုင္ႏိုင္ၾကသည္။ ထုိ႔ေၾကာင့္ သတၱဳတူးေဖာ္သည့္ကုမၸဏီမ်ားႏွင့္ အိမ္နီးခ်င္းႏိုင္ငံမွ ေရႊျဖဴ၀ယ္ယူသူတုိ႔သည္ လူမႈေရးႏွင့္ သဘာ၀ပတ္၀န္းက်င္ ထိန္းသိမ္းေရးဆုိင္ရာ တာ၀န္မ်ားကို ေရွာင္ရွားျခင္းျဖင့္ သတၱဳတူးေဖာ္ျခင္း လုပ္ငန္းမွ အျမတ္ေငြ မ်ားႏိုင္သမွ် မ်ားမ်ားရေအာင္ ေဆာင္ရြက္ေနၾကသည္။ ထုိ႔ေၾကာင့္ လားဟူ အမ်ိဳးသမီးအဖဲြ႔က ေဒသတြင္းဖံြ႔ၿဖိဳးတုိးတက္မႈကို မျဖစ္ေစဘဲ ဆင္းရဲမဲြေတမႈႏွင့္ သဘာ၀ပတ္၀န္းက်င္ ပ်က္ဆီးမႈကိုသာျဖစ္ေစသည့္ သတၱဳတူးေဖာ္ျခင္းလုပ္ငန္းကို ခ်က္ခ်င္း ရပ္တန္႔ရန္ ျမန္မာအစိုးရအား ေတာင္းဆုိသည္။
Language: Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: Lahu Women's Organization
Format/size: pdf (2.3MB)
Alternate URLs: http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs13/Grab_for_White_Gold-PR(bu).pdf (Press Release, Burmese)
Date of entry/update: 14 May 2012


Title: Grab for white gold - platinum mining in Eastern Shan State (English)
Date of publication: 08 May 2012
Description/subject: Burmese and Chinese companies are pushing aside Akha, Lahu and Shan villagers in eastern Shan State in a grab for platinum (“white gold” in Burmese). Women are facing particular hardship due to the loss of livelihood and the contamination of water sources. The Lahu Women Organization is calling for an immediate halt to these damaging mining operations....Summary Since 2007, destructive platinum mining has been taking place in the hills north of Tachilek, eastern Shan State, impacting about 2,000 people from eight Lahu, Akha and Shan villages. The platinum is being extracted by Burmese mining companies and exported to China and Thailand. Five companies are currently operating around the Akha village of Ah Yeh, 13 kilometers north of Tachilek. They have forced villagers to sell property and land at cheap prices, and confiscated other lands without compensation. Hundreds of acres of farms and forestland have been seized, or destroyed by dumping of mining waste. The villagers’ access road to the main highway has been ruined by the passage of heavy mining trucks and machinery. The main water source for local villagers has been diverted and contaminated by the mining, causing tremendous hardship for local women, who must now walk long distances to do their washing. Women are also facing increased security risks from the influx of migrant male miners into the area. There is regular sexual harassment of women going to their fields. Young women are being taken as minor wives by the miners; some are also becoming sex workers. Mining staff have also been involved in trafficking of local women. There is no rule of law protecting the rights of the local villagers. By paying off the local Burmese military, mining companies are able to carry out operations without adhering to any social or environmental standards. The companies and platinum buyers in neighbouring countries are therefore maximizing profits by avoiding responsibility for the social and environmental costs of the mines. The Lahu Women’s Organisation therefore calls on the Burmese government to put an immediate stop to these destructive mining operations, which are not contributing to local development, but are causing poverty and environmental degradation..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: Lahu Women's Organization
Format/size: pdf (1.8MB)
Alternate URLs: http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs13/Grab_for_White_Gold%28en%29-op100-mr-red.pdf
Date of entry/update: 14 May 2012


Title: Grab for white gold - platinum mining in Eastern Shan State (Lahu)
Date of publication: 08 May 2012
Description/subject: Summary: Since 2007, destructive platinum mining has been taking place in the hills north of Tachilek, eastern Shan State, impacting about 2,000 people from eight Lahu, Akha and Shan villages. The platinum is being extracted by Burmese mining companies and exported to China and Thailand. Five companies are currently operating around the Akha village of Ah Yeh, 13 kilometers north of Tachilek. They have forced villagers to sell property and land at cheap prices, and confiscated other lands without compensation. Hundreds of acres of farms and forestland have been seized, or destroyed by dumping of mining waste. The villagers’ access road to the main highway has been ruined by the passage of heavy mining trucks and machinery. The main water source for local villagers has been diverted and contaminated by the mining, causing tremendous hardship for local women, who must now walk long distances to do their washing. Women are also facing increased security risks from the influx of migrant male miners into the area. There is regular sexual harassment of women going to their fields. Young women are being taken as minor wives by the miners; some are also becoming sex workers. Mining staff have also been involved in trafficking of local women. There is no rule of law protecting the rights of the local villagers. By paying off the local Burmese military, mining companies are able to carry out operations without adhering to any social or environmental standards. The companies and platinum buyers in neighbouring countries are therefore maximizing profits by avoiding responsibility for the social and environmental costs of the mines. The Lahu Women’s Organisation therefore calls on the Burmese government to put an immediate stop to these destructive mining operations, which are not contributing to local development, but are causing poverty and environmental degradation.
Language: Lahu (Metadata: English)
Source/publisher: Lahu Women's Organization
Format/size: pdf (1.6MB)
Alternate URLs: https://democracyforburma.wordpress.com/2012/05/11/lahu-women-report-grab-for-white-gold-impacts-of...
Date of entry/update: 14 May 2012


Title: Japan's Itochu joins the charge of the mining brigade in to Burma
Date of publication: 04 May 2012
Description/subject: "It is reported in the Japanese press today that Itochu Corp has begun a feasibility study in the country to isolate specialty metals including tungsten and molybdenum. This follows approaches by Japanese officials last year trying to get a deal with Burma for access to rare earths, the elements vital to Japanese industry’s high tech and hybrid car programs. South Korea has also been lobbying the Burmese over rare earths. Chinese companies have also been eyeing projects in the country. In 2008, China National Petroleum Corp signed a 30-year gas agreement covering production from three blocks in the Bay of Bengal. But this is only the beginning. The country will be a big target because it has bountiful resources in close proximity to resource-hungry India and China..."
Author/creator: Robin Bromby
Language: English
Source/publisher: "The Australian"
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 06 May 2012


Title: Pa-Oh youth launch campaign to oppose damaging impacts of Burma’s largest iron mine (text and video)
Date of publication: 27 October 2010
Description/subject: "Save our Mountain, Save out Future": Pinpet Iron Mine and Steel Mill plant, near Taunggyi..."The Pa-Oh Youth Organisation (PYO) has produced a video and leaflets showing the destruction already caused by the mining project, due to start next year, including loss of farmlands, pollution of waterways, and abuses committed by the Burmese regime’s troops providing security for the project. Hundreds of copies of the video have already been distributed in the affected areas. Construction of the massive iron factory, jointly funded by Russian state-owned Tyazhpromexport company, is almost complete. 100 villagers are now being ordered out of the project area, among 7,000 people slated for relocation once Pinpet mountain starts being leveled for open pit mining. A further 35,000 villagers will be impacted by pollution of the Thabet Stream, which has been diverted to clean and process the iron ore. Affected communities have appealed to local authorities to stop the land confiscation and forced relocation, but so far to no avail. “There is a news black-out about the Pinpet project in Burma. We want to raise awareness about the damage being caused and support community efforts to oppose the project,” said PYO spokesperson Khun Chan Khe..." To see the video and an update on the project, see http://pyo-org.blogspot.com/ ..... ပအိုဝ်းလူငယ်လှုပ်ရှားတက်ကြွသူများက ရှမ်းပြည်နယ် တောင်ကြီးမြို့နယ်ရှိ မြန်မာပြည်၏ အကြီးဆုံး ပင်းပက် သံသတ္တုမိုင်းမှ ထိခိုက်ဆိုးကျိုးများအား ဆန့်ကျင်ကန့်ကွက်နေသည့် ဒေသခံပြည်သူများ အားဝိုင်းဝန်း ထောက်ခံအားပေးရေးအတွက် ယနေ့ လှုပ်ရှားမှုကို ကျင်းပပြုလုပ်ခြင်း ဖြစ်ပါသည်။ လှုပ်ရှားမှုနှင့်ပတ်သက်၍သတ္တုမိုင်း စီမံကိန်းကြောင့် ထိခိုက်ဖျက်ဆီးခံရမှုများကို ဗွီဒီယို၊ လက်ကမ်းစာစောင်များ အား မှတ်တမ်းတင်ထုတ်ဝေသည်။ ထိခိုက်ဖျက်ဆီးခံရမှုတွင် စီမံကိန်းလုံခြုံရေးကြောင့် ဒေသခံအာဏာပိုင်များက ကျူးလွန်ခဲ့သည့် လူ့အခွင့်အရေး ချိုးဖောက်ခံရမှုများ၊ ဒေသခံပြည်သူများမှ လယ်ယာမြေများ လက်လွတ်ဆုံးရှုံးရမှု၊ ရေထုညစ်ညမ်းမှုများ ကြုံတွေ့နေရပါသည်။ ထို့သို့ ထိခိုက် နစ်နာခဲ့ရသည့် ဒေသခံပြည်သူများပုံရိပ်ကို ပအိုဝ်းလူငယ် အစည်းအရုံးမှ ဓါတ်ပုံဗွီဒီယိုမှတ်တမ်း အနေဖြင့် ဖြန့်ဖြူး ထုတ်ဝေပါသည်။
Language: English, Burmese
Source/publisher: Pa_Oh Youth Organization (PYO)
Format/size: Adobe Flash; pdf (4K)
Alternate URLs: http://pyo-org.blogspot.com/
http://www.iphrdefenders.net/country-updates/myanmar/71-burma
Date of entry/update: 28 October 2010


Title: Save our Mountain Save our Future -- an update from Burma’s largest iron mine
Date of publication: October 2010
Description/subject: Pinpet Mountain under imminent threat as iron project speeds ahead.... "Excavation of Burma’s second largest iron deposit located in southern Shan State is imminent as bulldozers begin preparatory clearing on the iconic Pinpet Mountain, home to 7,000 people. The 300 residents in Pang Ngo village are in immediate danger from falling rocks and landslides as machines uproot trees, clear brush and remove top soil on the west side of the mountain. Farm fi elds at the foot of the mountain may be covered with toxic waste soils once the excavation starts as ore samples at the site have tested high for arsenic content. Construction activities at the secretive iron factory compound are also racing ahead. Underground bunkers are now complete and a massive new crushing facility (see inside) now towers above the compound walls. Surveys for uranium conducted on the mountain in the past continue to fuel persistent concerns that this project is linked to Burma’s nuclear plans. Meanwhile according to authorities the forced relocation of nearby villages will begin after the military regime’s sham elections, beginning with the extraction of a community graveyard in December. Land confi scation continues unabated. Local villagers are calling to stop the project, protect the mountain and save the main waterway for the entire Hopone valley from toxic pollution before it’s too late..." This briefing is an update of PYO’s report, "Robbing the Future published in June 2009".
Language: English, Burmese
Source/publisher: Pa-Oh Youth Organization (PYO)
Format/size: pdf (2.2MB - English; 2.2MB - Burmese)
Alternate URLs: http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs11/Pinpet_Updated_Broucher(bu).pdf
Date of entry/update: 03 February 2011


Title: Robbing the Future - Russian-backed Mining Project Threatens Pa-O Communities in Shan State, Burma
Date of publication: June 2009
Description/subject: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: "The transformation of Mount Pinpet, or "Pine Tree Mountain," in Burma's war-torn Shan State, for the excavation and refinement of the country's second largest iron ore deposit is changing the very nature of life there, and if not stopped could permanently destroy the home of more than 7,000 primarily ethnic Pa-O residents. Since 2004 Russian and Burmese companies have been preparing to develop the deposit and are currently building an iron processing plant and a cement factory on a total of 11,000 acres of lands. An Italian company is also believed to be involved in the project. Although there has been a ceasefire in the area since 1991, the military ruling Burma has established three sizeable battalion camps and two military universities in or around the nearby towns of Taunggyi and Hopone. Fighting has flared up south of the project site and has led to recent torture and killing of villagers by the Burma Army. Twenty-five villages, a total of 7,000 people, could be permanently displaced from their homes and farmlands by the projects. A further 35,000 people rely on the watershed of the Thabet Stream in the valley east of the mountain. Fifty people have already been forced to move and were not adequately compensated. The confiscation of vital farmlands has begun, leaving over 100 families without the primary source of their livelihood and sustenance. Travel restrictions have closed down a major road and prohibited villagers from collecting firewood, food, and shelter materials on the mountain. The entire mountain of Pinpet will be excavated for this project, irrevocably changing the landscape and environment of the area. Pollution from mine tailings and erosion of mine heaps threaten the main water source of Hopone Valley. Ancient pagodas have been cracked and may be demolished altogether by explosions to prepare construction sites and begin excavation. Local communities have not been informed or consulted about project plans and complaints to authorities about the confiscation of lands and lack of compensation have not been addressed. No assessments of the projects have been made public and mining authorities are pushing ahead by using the force of armed local military to relocate families, confiscate lands, restrict movements, and intimidate communities. The lack of information is compounded by persistent speculation that the mining operation is in fact being set up to exploit and refine uranium, not only iron ore and limestone. These fears are fueled by Burma's announcement in 2007 that Russia is to build a nuclear reactor in the country. The companies responsible for these projects should stop all activity and first conduct thorough and transparent assessments of the projects' environmental and social impacts; adequate compensation should be provided for those who have already lost their homes and lands; to assuage fears, all nuclear and uranium mining plans should be made public; and, such projects should not be conducted under the force of military power. The Pa-O Youth Organization stands with its community to protect livelihoods, land ownership, and cultural heritage, and calls on regional and international actors to inspect the Pinpet projects and use their influence to ensure respect for the rights of affected communities."
Language: English, Burmese
Source/publisher: Pa-O Youth Organization (PYO)
Format/size: pdf (English, 3.5MB; Burmese 4.1MB)
Alternate URLs: http://www.burmalibrary.org/docs07/Robbing_the_Future(bu).pdf
Date of entry/update: 02 July 2009


Title: ECONOMIC NON-VIABILITY, HUNGER AND MIGRATION: THE CASE OF MAWCHI TOWNSHIP
Date of publication: 14 May 2003
Description/subject: "Mawchi is a township in Northwest Karenni that was once a successful mining town. It was often referred to as 'little England' because of the life style on display there and its accompanying standards of living. Private British business interests developed the mines in Mawchi between the world wars, but the local economy began to decline, with the rest of Burma, with Ne Win’s Burmese Way to Socialism. The economy of Mawchi, and the standard of living for people in the Township, has continued to decline across successive military governments. The latest and the most severe economic crisis in Mawchi is the result of the regime's 1996 forced relocation campaign. This program led to the total collapse of agricultural production in the area and the subsequent collapse of the rest of the economy. All the villagers from the surrounding areas were forced to move into the town of Mawchi. The cessation of agricultural production brought about a massive increase in the price of food and a large increase in unemployment. Now most people are more or less constantly hungry and spend their days scrounging around looking for food. All the children in the city are engaged in helping their parents obtain food - collecting birds, worms, frogs and insects to eat. Hardly any rice produced gets to market as it is kept for the family to eat and to pay back debts. The small amount of rice that does reach the market, which most cannot afford, is of the lowest quality and fit only for being boiled. This has caused most people to leave the township for Thailand and a number of the cease-fire areas..."
Author/creator: Alison Vicary
Language: English
Source/publisher: BURMA ECONOMIC WATCH
Format/size: html (86K)
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003