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Religion in Burma - general

Websites/Multiple Documents

Title: "BurmaNet News" Religion archive
Language: English
Source/publisher: Various sources via "BurmaNet News"
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 08 March 2015


Individual Documents

Title: A Study of Saddhamma Saṅgaha Treatise
Date of publication: 26 July 2015
Description/subject: Introduction: "The Saddhamma Sangaha is a work of 14 century AD on the history of Buddhist religion and Pali Literature. The author of Saddhamma Saṅ gaha is Venerable dhammakitti. He was a Thai native who, being desirous of coming to Ceylon traveled to that country and after performing meritorious deeds he received ordination under the chief monk. While he was staying in Ceylon he composed this work by Pāḷi and then returns to his native land and lived in Thailand. This work is mentioned as Thai Pāḷi Text by H. Saddhātissa’s Pāḷi Literature of Thailand (1979). His work is a History of Buddhism in Ceylon. It has eleven chapters and contains the five Buddhist Council, how Buddha Sāsanā arrived in Ceylon, the life and literary works of distinguished commentator Mahā Buddhaghosa, the accounts of Tīkās and Ganthantara treatises and the advantage of writing Piṭaka Scriptures and advantage of listing to the discourses. It was published in Roman Characters edited by N. Saddhānanda of 1961. In Myanmar no manuscript of it is found and the text has not yet been studied. It is assumed that once, the text was well acknowledged by the Myanmar Buddhist of Kongbound period for the stanza beginning with “Akkharā ekamekaňca.....” was quoted in the writings on the cords of palm leaf manuscripts belonging to that period. This stanza of the Saddhamma Saṅgaha is found nowhere in the treatise of Pāli Literature. This research paper will be described in the five sub titles as follows.".....Paper delivered at the International Conference on Burma/Myanmar Studies: Burma/Myanmar in Transition: Connectivity, Changes and Challenges: University Academic Service Centre (UNISERV), Chiang Mai University, Thailand, 24-­26 July 2015.
Author/creator: San San Wai
Language: English
Source/publisher: International Conference on Burma/Myanmar Studies: Burma/Myanmar in Transition: Connectivity, Changes and Challenges: University Academic Service Centre (UNISERV), Chiang Mai University, Thailand, 24-­26 July 2015
Format/size: pdf (164K)
Alternate URLs: http://rcsd.soc.cmu.ac.th/web/Burma/home.php#
Date of entry/update: 21 August 2015


Title: Dhamma Predication and Political Transition
Date of publication: 26 July 2015
Description/subject: "For those who have observed Burmese religious life long enough, one striking evolution of the last decades has been the growing place of Buddhist preaching in the practice of many monks and in the public space . While until the late eighties dhamma predication was hardly to be seen on the public scene, from the beginning of the nineties onward, it started to become more and more visible. Traditional ly monks were requested to preach on private or communal ritual occasions such as funerals, noviciation or offerings made at the monastery at the end of the rain retreat season (kahteinbwe). The large public performance of «dhamma talks» by monks invited by laypeople independently of any ritual occasion contrasts sharply with these previous practices. They are c alled in Burmese taya bwe, the “feast of Law”, they are held at night and usually last around an hour, or more. As stated by Mahinda Deegalle in his study on Sri Lanka (2006), the development of public predication, known as the bana tradition in that context, particularly from the beginning of the eighteen th century onward, corresponds to the will of consolidating Buddhist communities through popularization of Buddhist teachings. In Burma, resorting to mass preaching to educate the public at large has its own genealogy starting in the early nineteenth century with the famous addresses of Thingaza Hsayadaw and those not less famous of Ledi Hsayadaw towards the end of the nineteenth century. Mass preaching had its heyday in the 1920s, when it was used as a tool to initiate reform among the public and contest the colonial rule by young activist monks such as Ottama and Wisara. It had continued until the 1960 s when it drastically decreased, after Ne Win’s military coup, because expressions of religious life then tended to be relegated to the p rivate sphere. The large public dhamma talks were to re-emerge only in the 1990s, at the joint initiative of local communities and the authorities, to become the highly popular events prevailing today...".....Paper delivered at the International Conference on Burma/Myanmar Studies: Burma/Myanmar in Transition: Connectivity, Changes and Challenges: University Academic Service Centre (UNISERV), Chiang Mai University, Thailand, 24-­26 July 2015.
Author/creator: Brac de la Perrière Bénédicte
Language: English
Source/publisher: International Conference on Burma/Myanmar Studies: Burma/Myanmar in Transition: Connectivity, Changes and Challenges: University Academic Service Centre (UNISERV), Chiang Mai University, Thailand, 24-­26 July 2015
Format/size: pdf (711K)
Alternate URLs: http://rcsd.soc.cmu.ac.th/web/Burma/home.php#
Date of entry/update: 10 August 2015


Title: Nat and Nat Kadaw : The Existence of the Local Cult in Myanmar Tradition
Date of publication: 26 July 2015
Description/subject: Introduction: "Myanmar has had the prosperous religion, traditional, and other forms of culture in their ways of life. Regarding of the religion, the long-­‐standing and extensive belief in holy and tutelary spirits (Nat) among Myanmese could be generally cited as the Myanmar’s tradition prior the Theravada. Then Buddhism has become to the official faith since King Anawrahta of Bagan dynasty instituted Theravada– a school of Buddhism– to be the principal religion in 11th century. Like Myanmar, other societies in Southeast-­‐Asia and all where the ancient belief and religion is respected and followed by those local people. Among the several Myanmar primitive cults, this article would like to raise the topic of the existence of colorful ritual which fully contains of high respect; Nat and Nat Kadaw (spirit and spirit medium). Actually, this traditional belief has been gradually illustrated by the scholars in different aspects, the classic one was written by the American anthropologist; Melford E. Spiro (1967). Three decades later, the specifically ritual book about the well-­‐known Myanmar local festival was completed by Yves Rodrigue (1995) and other views such as the intensive of this ritual, spirit and spirit medium have been still described by Bénédicte Brac de la Perrière (2009) and the other authors. This attractive cult, however, has still remained interesting phenomenon because the existence of the local be lief and rite has closely been in Myanmese ways of life from Buddhism belief, strict Buddhists and non-­‐Buddhist alliances. In addition, some interesting aspects are that how the Myanmar’s socio-­‐economic changing into the modern society effects to their local belief and spirit worship, how their social transition would affect to the people appealing, and how the Nat Kadaws play their roles and have relations under this context.".....Paper delivered at the International Conference on Burma/Myanmar Studies: Burma/Myanmar in Transition: Connectivity, Changes and Challenges: University Academic Service Centre (UNISERV), Chiang Mai University, Thailand, 24-­26 July 2015.
Author/creator: Patchareepan Ravangban
Language: English
Source/publisher: International Conference on Burma/Myanmar Studies: Burma/Myanmar in Transition: Connectivity, Changes and Challenges: University Academic Service Centre (UNISERV), Chiang Mai University, Thailand, 24-­26 July 2015
Format/size: pdf (184K)
Alternate URLs: http://rcsd.soc.cmu.ac.th/web/Burma/home.php#
Date of entry/update: 21 August 2015


Title: Myanmar: Portraits of Diversity: U Nay Win (video)
Date of publication: April 2015
Description/subject: "Commissioned by CPCS, Myanmar: Portraits of Diversity is a series of short films seeking to stimulate discussion and move audiences towards recognizing, accepting, and celebrating religious diversity in Myanmar. Directed by Kannan Arunasalam, the films present individuals from Myanmar’s different religious communities and highlight the inter-faith connections and engagement that take place naturally around the country. Featuring stories of cooperation across religious and ethnic divides, as well as the capacity for peace leadership within the country, community leaders share analysis and insights into the threat of inter-communal violence and illustrate the capacity for peace leadership...The film series seeks to stimulate alternative narratives regarding ethnic and spiritual issues in Myanmar where tolerance and cooperation are highlighted, rather than conflict and persecution. Screened together with guided reflections, the films can be used as tools to stimulate exchanges of ideas about diversity and tolerance, and to create a space to foster acceptance and share visions for the future. The issues raised by individuals featured in the films can be used to generate discussions on Myanmar’s different religious communities and highlight the kinds of inter-faith connections and engagement that take place naturally around the country. A discussion and study guide is available for each video portrait, followed by suggested activities that can also be adapted to different learning environments. For each film, background is provided on the person and their context, followed by five discussion questions and extension activities..."
Language: English and Burmese
Source/publisher: Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies (CPCS)
Format/size: Vimeo player (6:09 minutes)
Alternate URLs: http://www.centrepeaceconflictstudies.org/interventions/myanmar-portraits-of-diversity/
Date of entry/update: 29 September 2015


Title: The Faiths and Traditional Beliefs of the Karen People (ကညီဖိတဖၣ်အတၢ်ဘူၣ်တၢ်ဘါဒီးတၢ်စူၢ်တၢ်နာ်)
Date of publication: March 2007
Language: Karen (ကရင္ဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: http://www.drumpublications.org/download/karenfaithsk.pdf
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 13 May 2015