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The Secretary-General's reports on the situation of human rights in Myanmar (English)

Websites/Multiple Documents

Title: UN human rights documents on Burma (Myanmar), by year (from 1991)
Description/subject: Resolutions of the General Assembly and Commission on Human Rights; reports by the Secretary-General and the Special Rapporteur on Myanmar; written statements by NGOs; reports with references to Myanmar by the Working Group on Arbitrary Detention, Special Rapporteur on toxic wastes, Special Rapporteur on Torture, Report of the High Commissioner on human rights and mass exoduses, Report of the Secretary-General on the rights of persons belonging to national or ethnic, religious and linguistic minorities, Report of the Secretary-General on the national practices related to the right to a fair trial.
Language: Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Russian, Spanish
Source/publisher: Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights
Format/size: html, pdf
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Individual Documents

Title: GA 2014 (69th Session): Report of the Secretary-General on the Situation of Human Rights in Myanmar (English)
Date of publication: 29 August 2014
Description/subject: Summary: "The present report, submitted pursuant to paragraph 16 of General Assembly resolution 68/242 , covers the period from 11 August 2013 to 6 August 2014. During the reporting period, Myanmar continued the reform agenda while the country geared up for the 2015 elections. Parliament enacted fresh laws reflecting popular needs and ensuring popular accountability. Efforts continued for a nationwide cease fire and for building the framework for a political dialogue. The tension in Rakhine did not lessen, causing widespread concern and alarm both domestically and internationally. Myanmar assumed the chairmanship of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations on 1 January 2014. The United Nations continued its wide - ranging engagement with and provision of support to Myanmar."
Language: English
Source/publisher: United Nations General Assembly (A/69/362)
Format/size: pdf (292K)
Alternate URLs: http://documents-dds-ny.un.org/doc/UNDOC/GEN/N14/522/28/pdf/N1452228.pdf?OpenElement
Date of entry/update: 10 October 2014


Title: GA 2013 (68th Session): Report of the Secretary-General on the Situation of Human Rights in Myanmar (English)
Date of publication: 19 August 2013
Description/subject: Summary: "The present report, submitted pursuant to paragraph 21 of General Assembly resolution 67/233 , covers the period from 25 August 2012 to 10 August 2013. During that period, Myanmar witnessed dramatic changes as the reform measures initiated in 2011 continued to be pursued through the building of new institutions and the enactment of new laws in active sessions of the national parliament and regional assemblies, while steady progress was ach ieved in national reconciliation through negotiations with erstwhile ethnic armed groups and encouragement of the voluntary return and resettlement of displaced p opulations. The Government carried out a series of reform measures aimed at transforming the economy into an increasingly market-oriented economy, opened new sector s to foreign investment and trade and introduced measures to ensure greater transparency and to combat corruption. As the country’s engagements with the outside world expanded widely, new challenges arose. The increased communal tensions and violent incidents around the country raised doubts as to whether they could undermine the reform process under way. The United Nations continued its wi de-ranging engagement with and provision of support to Myanmar"
Language: English
Source/publisher: United Nations General Assembly (A/68/331)
Format/size: pdf (93K)
Alternate URLs: http://documents-dds-ny.un.org/doc/UNDOC/GEN/N13/431/10/pdf/N1343110.pdf?OpenElement
Date of entry/update: 23 September 2013


Title: GA 2012 (67th Session): Report of the Secretary-General on the Situation of Human Rights in Myanmar (English)
Date of publication: 24 August 2012
Description/subject: Summary: "The present report is submitted pursuant to paragraph 32 of General Assembly resolution 66/230 and covers the period from August 2011 to July 2012. It has been a remarkable year of promise and change in Myanmar. Building on its initial efforts in the first half of 2011, the new civilian Government headed by President Thein Sein undertook dramatic and significant reform measures to consolidate democracy by building new institutions; enacting new laws in active sessions of the national parliament and regional assemblies; reaching out to various ethnic groups to promote peace and national reconciliation through inclusive consultation, and encouraging the voluntary return and resettlement of displaced populations; releasing significant numbers of political prisoners, including some of the most prominent figures; and taking measures to carry out economic reforms aimed at transforming the largely centralized economy into an increasingly market-oriented one that is open to foreign investment and trade. The changed political environment, following the meeting between President Thein Sein and Daw Aung San Suu Kyi in August 2011, resulted in the revision of the electoral laws that has enabled the National League for Democracy to return to the electoral fold after more than 20 years and to convincingly win 43 of the 45 seats in the by-election held on 1 April 2012. The past year has also witnessed a step change in the engagement between Myanmar and the international community. The member States of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) agreed to Myanmar’s hosting of the 2014 ASEAN summit. In the same period, the resumption of high-level bilateral engagement with Myanmar by the United States of America, the European Union and other interested countries brought about major shifts in their policies, including the review, suspension or lifting of their sanctions against Myanmar. With the United Nations, there was a new expansion in relations that enabled engagement on the normalization of restricted programmes and greater cooperation with the various agencies of the Organization in support of the country’s all-round political and socioeconomic development and in meeting humanitarian needs. I visited Myanmar from 29 April to 1 May 2012, which was my third visit to the country as Secretary-General."
Language: English
Source/publisher: United Nations General Assembly (A/67/333)
Format/size: pdf (91K)
Alternate URLs: http://daccess-ods.un.org/access.nsf/Get?OpenAgent&DS=A/67/333&Lang=E
Date of entry/update: 02 October 2012


Title: GA 2011 (66th Session) : Report of the Secretary-General on the Situation of Human Rights in Myanmar (English)
Date of publication: 05 August 2011
Description/subject: Summary: "The present report is submitted pursuant to paragraph 30 of General Assembly resolution 65/241 and covers the period from 26 August 2010 to 4 August 2011. During the reporting period, the remaining steps of the political road map led by the State Peace and Development Council were implemented, namely, the holding of general elections on 7 November 2010; the convening of the new Parliament in January 2011; and the transfer of power from the Council to the new Government on 30 March 2011. In the process, the Council was officially dissolved. On 13 November 2010, one week after the election, Daw Aung San Suu Kyi was released after seven years of house arrest."
Language: English
Source/publisher: United Nations (A/66/267)
Format/size: pdf (87K)
Date of entry/update: 08 September 2011


Title: GA 2010 (65th Session): Report of the Secretary-General on the Situation of Human Rights in Myanmar (English)
Date of publication: 14 September 2010
Description/subject: Summary: "The present report is submitted pursuant to General Assembly resolution 64/238 and covers the period from 26 August 2009 to 25 August 2010. Upon the reassignment of Ibrahim Gambari on 1 January 2010, I designated my Chef de Cabinet, Vijay Nambiar, as Special Adviser to oversee the good offices mandate. Since my last visit to Myanmar in July 2009, there have been some signs of flexibility from the Myanmar authorities in response to my proposals, such as the release, on 17 September 2009, of over 130 political prisoners as part of a broader amnesty. However, the detention of other political prisoners and the continued house arrest of Daw Aung San Suu Kyi remain of grave concern. It is regrettable that further opportunities to advance meaningful political dialogue among key stakeholders have not been pursued. Throughout the reporting period, continuous efforts were made to engage the Myanmar authorities and key stakeholders, in order to pursue the objectives of the good offices mandate. However, the Government, has not extended an invitation to my Special Adviser to engage further with the authorities and other concerned parties in the country since my last visit. This lack of meaningful engagement is disappointing. It is also a lost opportunity for Myanmar. Member States have an interest and responsibility to actively ensure that Myanmar extends the necessary cooperation. The upcoming elections, the country’s first in 20 years, present a major test of the prospects of peace, democracy and prosperity in the country. Myanmar’s senior leaders have made repeated statements of commitment to free and fair elections. The Government has issued electoral laws, appointed an 18-member Union Electoral Commission and announced an election date of 7 November 2010. As at 25 August, the Commission had approved the registration of 42 out of 47 political parties to contest the elections, including 5 of the 10 parties that had contested the 1990 elections and had re-registered. While this suggests that political space may have opened up by the standards of the past two decades, it is all the more necessary for the authorities to ensure that the elections are conducted in an inclusive, credible, participatory and transparent manner. In this regard, I reiterate my call for the release of all political prisoners, including Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, as the clearest signal of such commitments. During the reporting period, the Special Adviser exerted efforts to engage at the senior level with relevant United Nations offices, such as the interdepartmental working group on Myanmar, where a number of system-wide priorities were identified. The Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) continued a wide-ranging policy dialogue with the Government aimed at addressing the country’s developmental priorities and challenges. The United Nations country team and the Government reached agreement on a two-year joint humanitarian initiative on Northern Rakhine State. Two years after the establishment of the Tripartite Core Group mechanism by the Government, the United Nations and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), its mandate was concluded on 31 July 2010, with recognition and gratitude expressed by the Myanmar authorities. Myanmar must make progress in overcoming its twin legacies of political deadlock and armed conflict. Addressing the parallel challenges of respect for human rights, national reconciliation and democratization is an essential goal that remains to be fulfilled. It is critical to pursue dialogue and cooperation among all stakeholders, as well as greater political, social and economic openness. I am committed to continuing cooperation with the Government and people of Myanmar to enable their efforts to make a successful transition to a credible civilian and democratic Government. Myanmar stands to benefit greatly from the wideranging experiences of the United Nations and its efforts to assist in the humanitarian and socio-economic areas. I reiterate my call for unity of purpose and unity of action among key interested Member States, regional entities, multilateral development actors and international financial institutions, to encourage all domestic stakeholders to contribute to positive change in the national interest of Myanmar."
Language: English (also available in Arabic, Chinese, French, Russian and Spanish)
Source/publisher: United Nations General Assembly (A/65/367)
Format/size: pdf (86 K)
Date of entry/update: 27 October 2010


Title: GA 2008 (63rd Session) : Report of the Secretary-General on the Situation of Human Rights in Myanmar
Date of publication: 17 September 2008
Description/subject: Summary: The present report is submitted pursuant to paragraph 6 of General Assembly resolution 62/222. On 22 May 2007, the Secretary-General designated his Special Adviser on the International Compact with Iraq and Other Political Issues and former Under-Secretary-General for Political Affairs, Ibrahim Gambari, to continue to pursue the good offices on his behalf. During the reporting period, from 23 October 2007 to 5 September 2008, the Special Adviser visited Myanmar three times at the invitation of the Government, in November 2007, March 2008 and August 2008. On each visit, the Special Adviser was able to engage with representatives of both the Government of Myanmar and the opposition. During his visits and in all his discussions with representatives of the Government, opposition and other stakeholders, the Special Adviser continued his efforts on behalf of the Secretary-General to promote national reconciliation, the restoration of democracy and respect for human rights in Myanmar, in accordance with the objectives of relevant General Assembly resolutions. To that end, the Special Adviser focused on the following five key areas of concern to the United Nations and the international community, as endorsed by the Group of Friends of the Secretary-General and in the Security Council: (a) the release of all political prisoners, including Daw Aung San Suu Kyi; (b) the need for an enhanced, substantive and time-bound dialogue between the Government and Daw Aung San Suu Kyi; (c) the need for an inclusive and credible political transition process to civilian and democratic government; (d) avenues for improving socio-economic conditions, including through a broad-based national mechanism; and (e) ways to regularize the process of mutual engagement and cooperation through the good offices process. In consultations with Member States, the Secretary-General and the Special Adviser also reiterated four guiding principles for the implementation of the Secretary-General’s good offices mandate, namely: (a) the good offices are a process, not an event, and require sustained engagement through regular visits and consultations with all concerned; (b) the situation in Myanmar requires comprehensive engagement on a broad range of political, human rights, humanitarian and socio-economic issues; (c) engagement cannot be an end in itself, but must yield concrete results; and (d) the international community needs to continue to work together constructively in support of the goals of the good offices. Following the designation, on 8 October 2007, of the Minister for Relations with Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, they both met together five times between November 2007 and January 2008. This marked the first attempt at a dialogue between the Government and Daw Aung San Suu Kyi since 2003. In addition, for the first time in four years, Daw Aung San Suu Kyi was allowed to meet twice with the Central Executive Committee of the National League for Democracy (NLD). On 9 February 2008, the Government of Myanmar for the first time made public a time frame for the next steps in its political “road map” process towards the establishment of a civilian and democratic government, announcing that a national referendum on a draft constitution would be held in May 2008, followed by multiparty elections in 2010. On 2 May 2008, cyclone Nargis struck Myanmar, leaving an estimated 140,000 people dead or missing, and an estimated 2.4 million people severely affected. In response to the cyclone, the Secretary-General visited Myanmar on 22 and 23 May 2008, marking the first visit to that country by a Secretary-General of the United Nations in 44 years. Following the Secretary-General’s discussions with State Peace and Development Council Chairman Senior General Than Shwe, access for international aid workers was facilitated, and a Tripartite Core Group coordination mechanism was set up between the Government of Myanmar, the United Nations and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) to facilitate an effective largescale humanitarian response. On 25 May 2008, the Secretary-General returned to Myanmar to co-chair a joint high-level pledging conference in Yangon with the Government of Myanmar and ASEAN. On 10 May 2008, the Government of Myanmar held a constitutional referendum as planned, despite the Secretary-General’s call to it to dedicate all available resources to the emergency humanitarian response as a matter of priority. Voting was postponed to 24 May 2008 in the 47 townships most affected by the cyclone. On 29 May 2008, the Government announced that the draft constitution had been formally adopted, with a reported 92.48 per cent approval and 98.12 per cent turnout of voters. On 27 May 2008, the Government of Myanmar extended the house arrest of Daw Aung San Suu Kyi. In a statement issued on the same day, the Secretary- General expressed his disappointment at the Government’s decision and stressed that the release and ability of all political prisoners to take part in the political process remained at the forefront of discussions with the Government of Myanmar in the context of his good offices. From 4 to 7 August 2008, the new Special Rapporteur for Human Rights, Tomás Ojea Quintana, made his first visit to Myanmar at the invitation of the Government. This followed a visit by his predecessor, Paulo Sérgio Pinheiro, in November 2007, at the behest of the Special Adviser, after four years without being granted access to the country. It also followed the adoption, on 28 March and 18 June 2008, by the Human Rights Council, of two resolutions (7/31 and 8/14) urging Myanmar, inter alia, to cooperate with the Special Adviser. Following the official announcement of the adoption of a new Constitution, the Government of Myanmar has expressed its determination to proceed with multiparty elections by 2010, the fifth step in its seven-step road map. At the same time, a number of key stakeholders, including NLD, have formally stated their rejection of the new Constitution and the process by which it was adopted. Thus, despite the Government’s efforts in implementing its road map process, the political situation in Myanmar has become even more complex and challenging, drawing increased attention from the international community. The Secretary-General and his Special Adviser have consistently emphasized that only a credible and inclusive political process — based on mutual understanding and compromise by all stakeholders — can help to advance the prospects of durable peace, national reconciliation, democracy and respect for human rights in Myanmar. In this regard, the support of the international community, including countries in the region, for the good offices of the Secretary-General and the work of his Special Adviser continue to be essential to the continuation of those efforts. The Secretary- General welcomes and encourages the constructive role played by Myanmar’s neighbours and ASEAN member States in support of his good offices and the work of his Special Adviser. He further welcomes the April 2008 conclusion by the European Council on Myanmar and the July 2008 statements by ASEAN, the Group of Eight, the East Asian Summit, and the ASEAN Regional Forum, which all expressed support for his good offices and for the continued efforts of his Special Adviser. While the spirit of cooperation between Myanmar and the United Nations has been marked by improvement in recent months, including through the visits of the Secretary-General and of his Special Adviser, it remains a source of frustration that meaningful steps with tangible results have yet to be taken by the Myanmar authorities in response to the concerns and expectations of the United Nations and the international community in the context of the good offices process. Ultimately, the future of Myanmar rests with the Government and people of Myanmar. The role of the United Nations is to ascertain the positions of all parties and facilitate their efforts to work together through dialogue towards a mutually acceptable process of national reconciliation and democratization, in full respect of Myanmar’s sovereignty and in accordance with the expectations of the international community. Independently of any formal process, the political challenges of any transition to democracy require negotiated political solutions. As the country reaches a delicate juncture in its political development, there is no real alternative to a peaceful process of national reconciliation and now is the time for the Government and opposition alike to find ways to talk to each other and work together in the interest of the nation, with a view to advancing the shared objectives of peace, prosperity and democracy as the necessary foundations for long-term stability and development.
Language: English
Source/publisher: United Nations (A/63/356)
Format/size: pdf (86K)
Date of entry/update: 25 November 2008


Title: GA 2007 (62nd Session): Report of the Secretary-General on the Situation of Human Rights in Myanmar
Date of publication: 22 October 2007
Description/subject: Summary: The present report is submitted pursuant to paragraph 5 of General Assembly resolution 61/232. During the reporting period, two visits to Myanmar were undertaken in the context of the Secretary-General's good offices mandate. Following his first visit in May 2006, the Under-Secretary-General for Political Affairs undertook a second visit from 9 to 12 November 2006 at the invitation of the Government. On 22 May 2007, the Secretary-General designated his Special Adviser on the International Compact with Iraq and Other Political Issues and former Under-Secretary-General for Political Affairs, Ibrahim Gambari, to continue to pursue the good offices on his behalf. From June to August 2007, the Special Adviser engaged in extensive consultations with key interested countries, with a view to returning to Myanmar as soon as possible. In response to the demonstrations and crisis that broke out in the country on 19 August, which attracted unprecedented world attention and generated serious concerns within the international community, the Secretary-General on 26 September dispatched his Special Adviser to Myanmar, with the support of Myanmar's neighbours, the States members of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) and the Security Council. The Special Adviser visited Myanmar from 29 September to 2 October. Each visit to Myanmar included meetings with both the Chairman of the State Peace and Development Council, Senior General Than Shwe, and Daw Aung San Suu Kyi. In the course of these visits, five key areas of concern to the United Nations and the international community were identified on which the Government of Myanmar is expected to deliver concrete results: (a) the release of Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, or at least an improvement in her detention conditions, and a security review leading to the release of all political prisoners; (b) the need for a genuinely inclusive, participatory and transparent political process through which all the people of Myanmar can contribute to shaping their country's future; (c) the need for better cooperation with the United Nations and other humanitarian agencies with a view to ensuring free and unhindered humanitarian access, including the possibility of a technical assessment mission to border areas; (d) a cessation of hostilities in conflict areas, including Kayin State; and (e) the need for continued cooperation with the International Labour Organization on the establishment of a joint mechanism to evaluate forced labour complaints. Furthermore, the following guiding principles for the implementation of the good offices were welcomed by all key interested Member States: (a) the good offices is not an event but a process that will require sustained engagement through regular visits and consultations with all concerned; (b) Myanmar presents a complex situation that cannot be reduced to a single issue — however important that may be — but rather requires engagement on a broad range of political, human rights, humanitarian and socio-economic topics; (c) engagement cannot be an end in itself, but rather must yield concrete results; and (d) the international community needs to work together in order to encourage Myanmar to move in the right direction. Key interested countries also expressed concern to varying degrees about the situation in Myanmar, support for the Secretary-General's good offices and appreciation for the Special Adviser's efforts based on the above principles. Against a few modest but encouraging steps taken by the Government over the past year, the tragic events of recent weeks constituted a serious setback for Myanmar. The main objectives of the Special Adviser's visit to Myanmar during the recent crisis were threefold: (a) to assess the situation on the ground in the wake of recent demonstrations; (b) to deliver clear messages from the Secretary-General to the Myanmar authorities at the highest level in response to the situation; and (c) to try to promote dialogue between the Government and the opposition as the best path to ending the crisis and achieving national reconciliation. While the Secretary-General took note of the initial steps taken by the Government to de-escalate the crisis following the Special Adviser's visit, he remains concerned about continuing reports of human rights violations, particularly the excessive use of force and arbitrary detentions, and calls upon the authorities to put an immediate end to any abuses. The Secretary-General welcomes the announcement by the Government of a possible meeting between Senior General Than Shwe and Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and the subsequent announcement of the appointment of a liaison officer to establish a channel of communication with her, as suggested by the Special Adviser. The Secretary-General urges both parties to display maximum flexibility in order to meet as soon as possible and stands ready to continue to use his good offices to help facilitate any efforts at dialogue. The Secretary-General further encourages the Government of Myanmar to seriously consider the recommendations made by his Special Adviser to address the underlying political and economic factors to the recent unrest, including the need to release all political prisoners, and the possibility of establishing a broad-based constitutional review commission and a broad-based poverty alleviation commission. A/62/498 07-55746 3 While the Secretary-General recognizes that the responsibility for the future of Myanmar rests ultimately with the Government and people of Myanmar, he believes that a return to the status quo that existed prior to the crisis would be unacceptable and unsustainable. The Secretary-General is thus committed to making every effort, including through the intensification of his good offices, so that the United Nations can continue to work in partnership with Myanmar and support its efforts towards national reconciliation, the transition to democracy and full respect for human rights as the necessary foundations for long-term stability and prosperity. This will require the sustained engagement of the United Nations, with the active support of the international community, including especially the countries in the region. In this connection, the Secretary-General welcomes the constructive role played by Myanmar's neighbours and the members of ASEAN, and encourages such efforts to continue. The Secretary-General also welcomes the Presidential statement adopted by the Security Council on 11 October 2007 (S/PRST/2007/37) in support of his good offices mandate, as well as Human Rights Council resolution S-5/1 on the situation of human rights in Myanmar. The more united the international community is, the better the prospects for arriving at the shared goals of peace, democracy and prosperity for the people of Myanmar."
Language: English
Source/publisher: United Nations (A/62/498)
Format/size: pdf (66K)
Date of entry/update: 30 October 2007


Title: GA 2006 (61st Session): Report of the Secretary-General on the Situation of Human Rights in Myanmar
Date of publication: 09 October 2006
Description/subject: Summary: "The present report provides details on the good offices efforts undertaken by the Secretary-General aimed at facilitating national reconciliation and democratization in Myanmar, in accordance with General Assembly resolution 60/233 of 23 December 2005. During the reporting period, efforts were made by the United Nations to re-engage with the Myanmar authorities after no high-level contacts for nearly two years. Engagement at the appropriate senior level was considered critical if the Secretary-General was to exercise his good offices, especially after the resignation of his Special Envoy in January 2006. A series of discussions with the Government of Myanmar, through its Permanent Mission in New York, led to the visit to Myanmar by the Under- Secretary-General for Political Affairs in May 2006. The mission led by the Under- Secretary-General met with relevant stakeholders and raised issues of concern to the United Nations directly with the top leadership of the Government of Myanmar. Some developments have taken place as a follow-up to the mission. However, more tangible progress is needed, as a genuine process of democratization and national reconciliation has yet to be launched. While the Government's announcement that the National Convention would resume on 10 October 2006 is encouraging, there has been no indication to date that the process will be broadened to include representatives from the National League for Democracy and certain ethnic nationality political groups, or that the process will be altered so as to allow more meaningful involvement by participants. There is also concern over the slow pace and lack of inclusiveness of the road map process, as nearly three years have elapsed since its announcement and no clear outcome is yet in sight. The Secretary-General renews his call upon the Myanmar authorities to establish a substantive dialogue with the representatives of all ethnic nationality groups and political leaders. Such a dialogue should commence as soon as possible, starting with certain confidence-building measures, such as the release of a substantial number of political prisoners, the lifting of the remaining constraints on all political leaders, the reopening of offices of the National League for Democracy, and the inclusion of opposition and certain ethnic nationality groups in the ongoing road map process. If progress is made, the Secretary-General reiterates his readiness to help mobilize international assistance in supporting national reconciliation efforts so that the people of Myanmar can partake in the same benefits of economic, social and political development as those enjoyed in neighbouring countries."
Language: English
Source/publisher: United Nations (A-61-504)
Format/size: pdf (39 K)
Date of entry/update: 20 October 2006


Title: CHR 2006: Report of the Secretary-General on the situation of human rights in Myanmar
Date of publication: 28 February 2006
Description/subject: "...Despite the lack of progress in the national reconciliation process, the Secretary-General remains committed to offering his good offices. If progress occurs, the Secretary-General is prepared to do his utmost to mobilize all the necessary international assistance to support the Myanmar authorities in facilitating their national reconciliation efforts in order to ensure that the people of Myanmar can partake in the same benefits of economic, social and political development as are enjoyed in neighbouring countries."
Language: English
Source/publisher: United Nations (E/CN.4/2006/117)
Format/size: pdf (22K)
Date of entry/update: 01 April 2008


Title: GA 2005 (60th Session): Report of the Secretary-General on the Situation of Human Rights in Myanmar
Date of publication: 10 October 2005
Description/subject: Summary: "The present report is based upon the good offices efforts undertaken by the Secretary-General and his Special Envoy aimed at facilitating national reconciliation and democratization in Myanmar, in accordance with General Assembly resolution 59/263 of 23 December 2004. The Secretary-General believes that the National Convention, which is charged with drawing up the principles based upon which a new constitution will be drafted, and the seven-point road map towards democracy announced by the Myanmar authorities in 2003, have the potential to generate positive change. However, as he has stressed from the beginning, the road map process should be transparent and allinclusive in order to ensure its credibility. To date, the National Convention — whose reconvening in 2004 constituted the first step of the seven-point road map, has regrettably fallen short of satisfying these basic requirements. The Convention, which is expected to resume later in 2005, continues to exclude representatives from many political parties, including the National League for Democracy, and several ethnic nationality groups, as well as other crucial groups of society. It also fails, in its present format, to adhere to the recommendations made by successive resolutions of the General Assembly. The Secretary-General thus reiterates his call upon the Myanmar authorities to take the necessary steps to make the road map process more inclusive and credible when the Convention resumes later in 2005, and during subsequent phases of the road map process, including those for drafting the constitution and organizing a national referendum. As a first step towards that end, the Secretary-General encourages the Myanmar authorities to resume dialogue with the representatives of all ethnic nationality groups and political leaders. Such a step should commence as soon as possible and be followed by: further release of political prisoners; the lifting of the remaining constraints on all political leaders; reopening of offices of the National League for Democracy; and inclusion of the aforementioned groups in the ongoing road map process. The Secretary-General hopes to see these steps implemented by the first half of 2006. If progress occurs, the Secretary-General is prepared to do his utmost to mobilize all the necessary international assistance to support the Myanmar authorities in facilitating their national reconciliation efforts so that the people of Myanmar can partake in the same benefits of economic, social and political development as are enjoyed in neighbouring countries."
Language: English
Source/publisher: United Nations (A/60/422)
Format/size: pdf (37 K)
Date of entry/update: 19 October 2005


Title: CHR 2005: Report of the Secretary-General on the situation of human rights in Myanmar
Date of publication: 07 March 2005
Description/subject: Summary: "The present report is based upon the good offices efforts undertaken by the Secretary-General and his Special Envoy, Razali Ismail, in facilitating national reconciliation and democratization in Myanmar, in accordance with General Assembly resolution 59/263 of 23 December 2004. The Secretary-General has maintained from the very beginning that the National Convention and subsequent stages in the seven-step road map for transition to democracy put forth by the Government of Myanmar in 2003 has the potential to be a positive step forward. He has stressed that to ensure credibility it is essential that the National Convention phase of the road map, which the Government reconvened in May 2004 to lay the foundations on which a new constitution is drafted, includes representatives of the National League for Democracy (NLD), other political parties and ethnic nationality groups, as well as other strata of society. The Secretary-General has similarly made it clear that all those involved in the National Convention must also be allowed to speak freely, openly and without restriction on the matters at hand. To date, however, the National Convention has regrettably fallen short of satisfying these basic requirements. On 17 February 2005, the Convention was again reconvened without the participation of representatives of the NLD and other political parties. Furthermore, Daw Aung San Suu Kyi not only remains under house arrest, but along with her deputy has also had her detention extended for a further year. Other political and ethnic leaders have also been arrested or detained, causing one ceasefire group to boycott the Convention. Most regrettably, it therefore remains the Secretary-General’s view that the National Convention, in its present format, does not adhere to the recommendations made by the General Assembly in successive resolutions. He thus reiterates his call on the Myanmar authorities, even at this late stage, to take the necessary steps to make the road map process more inclusive and credible. The Secretary-General also encourages the authorities to ensure that the third phase of the road map, the drafting of the constitution, is fully inclusive. A national referendum will be held after that. It is his considered view that unless this poll adheres to internationally accepted standards of conduct and participation, it may be difficult for the international community, including the countries of the region, to endorse the result. In furtherance of this objective, the Secretary-General once again appeals to the Myanmar authorities to resume without delay a substantive political dialogue with the representatives of all ethnic nationality groups and political leaders, including Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, to help achieve a genuine process of national reconciliation. He reiterates the need for the remaining constraints on all political leaders to be lifted, NLD offices to be allowed to reopen and political prisoners, including elected officials, to be released. In this context, the Secretary-General renews his readiness to facilitate national reconciliation efforts among all parties concerned. At the same time, however, he wishes to articulate his deep concern at the Myanmar authorities’ continued unwillingness to cooperate with his Special Envoy over the past year. The present situation casts serious doubt on the prospects for the United Nations to play an effective role as a facilitator in furtherance of the relevant resolutions of the General Assembly. He urges the authorities to demonstrate their commitment to a credible process of democratization and national reconciliation by allowing his Special Envoy to return to Myanmar to continue his facilitation efforts." "
Language: English
Source/publisher: United Nations (E/CN.4/2005/130)
Format/size: pdf (28K)
Date of entry/update: 13 March 2005


Title: GA 2004: Report of the Secretary-General on the Situation of Human Rights in Myanmar
Date of publication: 16 August 2004
Description/subject: Summary: The present report is based upon the good offices efforts undertaken by the Secretary-General and his Special Envoy, Razali Ismail, in attempting to facilitate national reconciliation and democratization in Myanmar, in accordance with General Assembly resolution 58/247 of 23 December 2003. The discussions that the Secretary-General and his Special Envoy have had separately with the Myanmar authorities during the reporting period focused on the need for the latter to make the seven-step road map for democratic transition, announced by Prime Minister General Khin Nyunt on 30 August 2003, a credible vehicle for national reconciliation and democratization by ensuring that it was all-inclusive and transparent from the beginning. During his mission in March 2004, the Special Envoy explained the United Nations position to the Government, Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and the National League for Democracy, as well as to representatives of other political parties and ethnic nationality groups. On 17 May, however, the National Convention was reconvened without the participation of the National League for Democracy and some ethnic nationality political parties. Moreover, Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and her deputy, U Tin Oo, who had been detained after the Depayin incident of 30 May 2003, remained under house arrest. Their status remains unchanged at the time of reporting. The Secretary-General is seriously concerned by the absence of an all-inclusive process of national reconciliation and democratization in Myanmar. Recalling the assurances given by the Government of Myanmar to his Special Envoy that the road map process would be all-inclusive, the Secretary-General urges Senior General Than Shwe and other senior leaders of the State Peace and Development Council to use the opportunity presented by the 9 July adjournment of the National Convention to lift, as a matter of priority, the remaining restrictions on Daw Aung San Suu Kyi; to commence a substantive dialogue with her and her party immediately; to take the necessary steps to ensure that the National Convention process is all-inclusive and open; and to ensure that the views of the delegates, including those already articulated by the ethnic nationality ceasefire groups, are adequately taken into account. Those actions, if taken, would provide the basis of a credible forum for a tripartite dialogue among the Government, the National League for Democracy and ethnic nationalities. In addition, the Secretary-General calls on the countries in the region, and especially the member States of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, to take a leading role in counselling the State Peace and Development Council to take the aforementioned steps. He also urges the Council to allow his Special Envoy to resume regular visits so that he can help to facilitate national reconciliation and democratization in the country. In that context, the Secretary-General notes with concern that repeated requests for his Special Envoy to be allowed to return to Myanmar (and similar requests made by the Special Rapporteur of the Commission on Human Rights, Paulo Sergio Pinheiro), have, to date, been considered “not convenient” by the Myanmar authorities. Under the circumstances, there can be no escaping the conclusion that Myanmar has not cooperated to the maximum extent possible with the United Nations; consequently, the United Nations facilitation efforts have not been as effective as they could have been. The Secretary-General is nevertheless determined to continue providing his good offices, on the basis of successive General Assembly resolutions and in support of the people of Myanmar, who have hitherto been prevented from enjoying the same benefits of economic, social and political development as their counterparts in neighbouring countries.
Language: English
Source/publisher: United Nations (A/59/269)
Format/size: pdf (44 K)
Date of entry/update: 23 September 2004


Title: CHR 2004: Report of the Secretary-General on the Situation of Human Rights in Myanmar
Date of publication: 03 March 2004
Description/subject: ADVANCE EDITED VERSION Distr. GENERAL E/CN.4/2004/30 3 March 2004 Original: ENGLISH COMMISSION ON HUMAN RIGHTS Sixtieth session Item 9 of the provisional agenda QUESTION OF THE VIOLATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS AND FUNDAMENTAL FREEDOMS IN ANY PART OF THE WORLD Situation of human rights in Myanmar Report of the Secretary-General
Language: English
Source/publisher: United Nations (E/CN.4/2004/30)
Format/size: pdf (101K)
Alternate URLs: http://ap.ohchr.org/documents/alldocs.aspx?doc_id=9084
Date of entry/update: 23 March 2004


Title: GA 2003: Report of the Secretary-General on the Situation of Human Rights in Myanmar: Addendum
Date of publication: 06 November 2003
Description/subject: Update to incorporate the Special Envoy's visit to Burma, 30 September to 2 October 2003
Language: English
Source/publisher: United Nations (A/58/325/Add.1)
Format/size: pdf (39K)
Date of entry/update: 19 November 2003


Title: GA 2003: Report of the Secretary-General on the Situation of Human Rights in Myanmar
Date of publication: 25 August 2003
Description/subject: "...The present report is based upon the good offices efforts undertaken by the Secretary-General and his Special Envoy, Razali Ismail, in attempting to facilitate national reconciliation and democratization in Myanmar, in accordance with General Assembly resolution 57/231 of 18 December 2002. The discussions that the Secretary-General and his Special Envoy have had separately with the Myanmar authorities during this reporting period continued to focus on the issue of how the United Nations can be of assistance in facilitating the national reconciliation process in Myanmar. During this period, the optimism that followed the lifting of the remaining restrictions on Daw Aung San Suu Kyi on 11 May 2002 dissipated. Contrary to the expectations of the Myanmar people, who are overwhelmingly in favour of change, and the United Nations, there was no substantive progress towards national reconciliation and democratization in Myanmar. Following the events in northern Myanmar of 30 May, which resulted in the detention of Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and other leaders of the National League for Democracy (NLD), Myanmar’s embryonic and home-grown national reconciliation process, as understood by the United Nations, was halted. Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and other NLD leaders still remain detained and incommunicado at the time of this reporting. The Secretary- General remains gravely concerned about the safety and well-being of these NLD leaders and others detained after 30 May and reiterates his call for the Myanmar authorities to remove, without delay, all the restrictions imposed on their freedom of movement and political activities. He is also seriously concerned that the absence of 2 A/58/325 progress in the process of national reconciliation and democratization is to the detriment of the Myanmar people, who voted for change in 1990 and deserve to experience the same benefits of economic, civil, social and political development as their counterparts in neighbouring countries. The Secretary-General reiterates his determination to do his utmost to revive the national reconciliation process if all parties are willing. He particularly appeals to the leaders of the State Peace and Development Council to release Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and commence substantive political dialogue with her immediately, so that national reconciliation and democratization in Myanmar can be achieved at an early date, with the participation of all the interested parties concerned, and in a way that brings immediate and tangible benefits to the Myanmar people..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: United Nations (A/58/325)
Format/size: pdf (47K)
Date of entry/update: 01 October 2003


Title: CHR 2003: Report of the Secretary-General on the situation of human rights in Myanmar
Date of publication: 10 March 2003
Language: English
Source/publisher: United Nations (E/CN.4/2003/33)
Format/size: html
Alternate URLs: http://ap.ohchr.org/documents/alldocs.aspx?doc_id=3289
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: GA 2002: Report of the Secretary-General on the Situation of Human Rights in Myanmar
Date of publication: 16 October 2002
Description/subject: United Nations A/57/484 General Assembly Distr.: General 16 October 2002 Original: English Fifty-seventh session Agenda item 109 (c) Summary: "The present report is based upon the good offices undertaken by the Secretary- General and his Special Envoy, Razali Ismail, to facilitate national reconciliation and democratization in Myanmar, in accordance with General Assembly resolution 56/231 of 24 December 2001. The discussions that the Secretary-General and his Special Envoy have had separately with the Myanmar authorities during the reporting period have focused on the issue of how the United Nations, which has been facilitating the confidence-building talks that started between the Government and Daw Aung San Suu Kyi in October 2000, can be of assistance in moving these discussions towards a more substantive dialogue. Some significant developments have taken place, including the restoration of Daw Aung San Suu Kyi’s freedom of movement on 6 May. However, substantive dialogue between the Government and Daw Aung San Suu Kyi has not started yet. Concerned that the positive momentum generated since this spring will be lost unless some tangible progress is made in the near future, the Secretary-General reiterates his call on the Government and Daw Aung San Suu Kyi to set aside their differences, unite for the larger cause of national reconciliation and start their political dialogue as soon as possible so that a national reconciliation acceptable to all interested parties in Myanmar can be achieved at an early date. * The present report is being submitted on 16 October 2002 so as to include as much up-to-date information as possible..."
Language: English
Source/publisher: United Nations A/57/484
Format/size: pdf (53K)
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: CHR 2002: Report of the Secretary-General on the situation of human rights in Myanmar
Date of publication: 18 March 2002
Language: English
Source/publisher: United Nations (E/CN.4/2002/35)
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: CHR 2001: Report of the Secretary-General on the situation of human rights in Myanmar
Date of publication: 22 March 2001
Language: English
Source/publisher: United Nations (E/CN.4/2001/33)
Alternate URLs: http://ap.ohchr.org/documents/alldocs.aspx?doc_id=2340
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: GA 2000: Report of the Secretary-General on the Situation of Human Rights in Myanmar
Date of publication: 20 October 2000
Language: English
Source/publisher: United Nations (A/50/509)
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: CHR 1999: Report of the Secretary-General on the Situation of Human Rights in Myanmar
Date of publication: 07 April 1999
Language: English
Source/publisher: United Nations (E/CN.4/1999/29)
Alternate URLs: http://ap.ohchr.org/documents/alldocs.aspx?doc_id=1447
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: GA 1998: Report of the Secretary-General on the Situation of Human Rights in Myanmar
Date of publication: 10 November 1998
Language: English
Source/publisher: United Nations (A/53/657)
Alternate URLs: http://ap.ohchr.org/documents/alldocs.aspx?doc_id=5404
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: CHR 1998: Report of the Secretary-General on the Situation of Human Rights in Myanmar
Date of publication: 09 April 1998
Language: English
Source/publisher: United Nations (E/CN.4/1998/163
Format/size: pdf (234K)
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: GA 1997: Report of the Secretary-General on the Situation of Human Rights in Myanmar
Date of publication: 10 November 1997
Language: English
Source/publisher: United Nations (A/52/587)
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: CHR 1997: Report of the Secretary-General on the Situation of Human Rights in Myanmar
Date of publication: 27 March 1997
Language: English
Source/publisher: United Nations (E/CN.4/1997/129)
Alternate URLs: http://ap.ohchr.org/documents/alldocs.aspx?doc_id=803
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: CHR 1996: Report of the Secretary-General on the Situation of Human Rights in Myanmar
Date of publication: 17 April 1996
Language: English (Francais, Espanol non disponible)
Source/publisher: United Nations (E/CN.4/1996/157)
Alternate URLs: http://ap.ohchr.org/documents/alldocs.aspx?doc_id=614
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: GA 1995: Report of the Secretary-General on the Situation of Human Rights in Myanmar
Date of publication: 24 November 1995
Language: English
Source/publisher: United Nations (A/50/782)
Format/size: pdf (19 K)
Date of entry/update: 07 July 2005


Title: GA 1994: Report of the Secretary-General on the Situation of Human Rights in Myanmar
Date of publication: 25 November 1994
Language: English
Source/publisher: United Nations (A/49/716)
Format/size: pdf (17 K)
Date of entry/update: 07 July 2005