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Australia-Burma relations

Websites/Multiple Documents

Title: Myanmar for Australia
Date of publication: 16 November 2012
Description/subject: "For as long as I can remember Australian governments have maintained Myanmar and Burma as the two names for one of Southeast Asia’s most important countries. Now — on websites and in public statements — consistency reigns among Australia’s officialdom. This recently updated fact sheet sums it up neatly: “The Australian Government refers to the country as Myanmar”. Check out the government’s travel advice website for the newly Myanmarised presentation. I did a cheeky Control-F for “Burma” and came up with nothing. Downunder, at least, the linguistic transition has occurred. And, for those who are interested in some archival matter, my April 2012 thoughts on the topic are available here."
Author/creator: Nicholas Farrelly
Language: English
Source/publisher: "New Mandala"
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 17 July 2014


Title: *Youtube search for Burma OR Myanmar - Australia* (video)
Description/subject: About 375,000 results (August 2017)
Language: English, Burmese (ျမန္မာဘာသာ)
Source/publisher: Various sources via Youtube
Format/size: Adobe Flash or html5
Date of entry/update: 22 August 2017


Title: Australian Embassy in Burma (Myanmar)
Description/subject: The pages include information about services for Australian travellers overseas, advice about immigration and visas, information about Australia's foreign policy and development assistance programs, and general information about Australia. This website also contains links to other websites which outline the roles and responsibilities of the different agencies and departments of the Australian government.
Language: English
Source/publisher: Australian Embassy Burma
Format/size: html
Alternate URLs: http://www.burma.embassy.gov.au/rang/relations.html
Date of entry/update: 14 October 2010


Individual Documents

Title: More name games in Burma/Myanmar
Date of publication: 10 August 2016
Description/subject: "Regular readers of The Interpreter will know that, over the past few years, this site has closely followed the Australian government's efforts to grapple with the diplomatic implications of the formal change of Burma's name in 1989 to Myanmar. The indications are that this saga may finally be over..."
Author/creator: Andrew Selth
Language: English
Source/publisher: "The Interpreter"
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 01 May 2017


Title: Eyewitness to Early Reform in Myanmar
Date of publication: 2016
Description/subject: Introduction... The Historical Contexts... Australian Ambassador to Myanmar... Working Under Military Authoritarian Rule... Myanmar in 2000: Ready Or Not For Change?... Engagement Versus Disengagement... Australia’s ‘Limited Engagement’ Initiatives... Encounters with Daw Aung San Suu Kyi... Bilateral Sanctions and Successful Alternative Approaches... Early Australian Public Diplomacy Possible in Myanmar... Reflections on Coming to Terms with Myanmar: Personally and as Convener, ANU Burma/Myanmar Update 2004–13... Image Section... Bibliography.
Author/creator: Trevor Wilson
Language: English
Source/publisher: ANU Press
Format/size: pdf (1.4MB)
Date of entry/update: 28 April 2016


Title: Damming Myanmar: Australian Involvement and the Shan’s Resistance
Date of publication: 2015
Description/subject: Australian involvement and the Shan’s resistance: "SMEC, an Australian-based services company that morphed out of the Snowy Mountains Engineering Corporation, was recently handed a petition containing 23,717 signatures opposing a giant dam on the upper Salween River at Mong Ton that would effectively divide Myanmar’s warshocked Shan state in half. It was not the first time it had been told the idea stinks. Undeterred, SMEC went back to the protest ing villages and continued its work. Later the Burma Army took five protesters, later releasing them. Some were beaten and slapped. SMEC is the public face of a consortium planning the dam. Its task, conducting the Environmental and Social Impact Assessments (EIAs and SIAs), takes it into potentially affected villages. SMEC finds itself heroically taking one for the gang: the disaster-prone Three Gorges Corporation; Sinohydro, which has been involved in several controversial dam projects in the past; the Myanmar Electricity Power Enterprise; and state energy monopsony Thai Electricity Generating Authority. There are rumours that a UK team of engineers, Malcolm Dunstan and Associates —involved in dam building in Myanmar in the past and, because of human-rights violations on the sites, placed on the UK Burma Campaign’s ‘Dirty Company’ list— might also be involved, but those could not be substantiated. SMEC has been meeting the people of Shan state, seeking agreement to build the Tasang dam at Mong Ton. It has faced serial rejection (a story detailing that rejection, with a critique of SMEC’s procedures, was removed from Asian Correspondent after legal threats from SMEC). Meetings have been cancelled due to local hostility. Shan women have risen to their feet, their voices rich and challenging, telling the SMEC representatives that, having survived years of war, they refuse to let their ancestral lands be drowned to produce unneeded electricity for China and Thailand..."
Author/creator: Melody Kemp
Language: English
Format/size: pdf (171K)
Date of entry/update: 31 January 2016


Title: Securitisation of Australian Aid
Date of publication: 05 December 2014
Description/subject: "...In Myanmar, just five days ago, The Department of Immigration announced it was giving an unspecified amount to the country over a five year period to strengthen ‘capacity for stronger border management’. Indeed Scott Morrison, at the beginning of the year, strangely referred to borders as ‘Australia’s greatest asset’ and since that time has channeled millions in aid and Department of Immigration and border security funding to export border technologies throughout the region under the rhetoric of ‘anti-people smuggling’, including in Cambodia. In the Myanmar case, it is clear that this is a blatant attempt to deal with the hundreds of thousands of Rohingya asylum seekers trying to make their way to Australia. There are currently 140,000 Rohingya in displacement camps and an unknown number who have already tried to make the perilous trip southwards..."
Author/creator: Tim Frewer
Language: English
Source/publisher: "New Mandala"
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 14 December 2014


Title: In the shoes of reporters in Naypyitaw
Date of publication: 24 November 2014
Description/subject: "There were plenty of hours leaning against walls, sitting on step-ladders or standing on steps at the recent Assocaition of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Summit in Naypyitaw. With the limited information reporters were getting from ASEAN leaders in the Summit rooms, I turned to the reporters to ask them of their impressions of the Summit, and more broadly, Naypyitaw..."
Author/creator: Olivia Cable
Language: English
Source/publisher: "New Mandala"
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 14 December 2014


Title: What Tony Abbott said in Naypyitaw
Date of publication: 13 November 2014
Description/subject: "In his speech, Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott highlighted the fact that trade between ASEAN countries and Australia today is eighty times larger than it was forty years ago. Furthermore, two-way investment is $155 billion dollars. Today, one million people visit Australia every year from ASEAN countries, and 2.5 million Australian’s visit ASEAN countries every year. More than 100,000 students from ASEAN countries study in Australia every year. According to Abbot this is a sign of the strength of the relationship between Australia and the nations of ASEAN. Abbott observed the weight ASEAN countries now have. For example, Malaysia is on the verge of becoming a high-income country. Indonesia is on its way to being a democratic superpower of Asia and Singapore’s GDP per head is higher than Australia’s. These ‘indisputable facts’ are a tribute to the work which ASEAN countries have done. Abbott sees Australia as having played its part to advance the region. Abbott made mention that Australia will set up an ASEAN-Australia Council, which seeks to work on people-to-people, institution-to-institution and business-to-business links in Asia. Furthermore, Australia will establish a Mekong business initiative, which seeks to develop small businesses in Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia. Abbott hopes ASEAN countries are now aware of the New Colombo Plan, where students from Australia are going to the region to compliment the flow of students from Southeast Asia to Australia..."
Author/creator: Olivia Cable
Language: English
Source/publisher: "New Mandala"
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 13 December 2014


Title: Ministerial Statement on Burma
Date of publication: 10 February 2010
Author/creator: STEPHEN SMITH
Language: English
Source/publisher: Australian Government
Format/size: html
Alternate URLs: http://www.ausaid.gov.au/media/release.cfm?BC=Speech&ID=4023_7267_6332_1366_4075
Date of entry/update: 14 October 2010


Title: Burma/Myanmar: internal issues and regional and international responses
Date of publication: 16 October 2009
Description/subject: Burma’s military government dominates the country’s politics and its economy.[1] It has continued to repress political opponents (including Aung San Suu Kyi) and its record in economic development and human rights is considered widely to be poor. While a number of Western governments have condemned the Burma regime’s policies, its relations with neighbouring countries (most notably China) have facilitated the regime in resisting external influence. The government has recently unveiled a new Constitution and has declared that elections will be held in 2010. Attention will focus in the next two years on whether the proposed elections will simply result in the consolidation of the military’s dominance or provide an avenue for some change. This Background Note outlines major recent developments in relation to Burma and Australia’s policies towards it.
Author/creator: Frank Frost
Language: English
Source/publisher: Parliment of Australia
Format/size: html
Alternate URLs: http://www.aph.gov.au/library/pubs/bn/fads/burma.htm
Date of entry/update: 14 October 2010


Title: Letter to Australian Foreign Minister Stephen Smith on a Burma Policy Review
Date of publication: 05 October 2009
Description/subject: On October 5, 2009, Human Rights Watch sent a letter to Australia's Foreign Minister Stephen Smith, urging Australia to work closely with its Asian neighbors to ensure a united front in addressing the human rights situation in Burma.
Author/creator: Kenneth Roth
Language: English
Source/publisher: Human Rights Watch
Format/size: html
Date of entry/update: 14 October 2010


Title: Dealing with Burma the Australian Way
Date of publication: October 2002
Description/subject: "Breaking ranks with the international community, Australia�s Foreign Minister Alexander Downer became the first Western official to visit Burma in decades... It is clear that despite calls from the international community the junta has no real commitment to improving human rights or bringing about real political change, in Burma. It only took 24 hours in Burma to confirm that for Australian Foreign Minister, Alexander Downer. After meeting with junta leaders and Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, Downer told the world that the junta has no current plans to discuss national reconciliation with the opposition. He also told the Thai Foreign Minster in Bangkok that the time had come to increase the pressure on Burma. Now, Australia says it will put more public and moral pressure on Rangoon to show good faith and begin talks with the opposition. On his visit to Burma, Downer�s remarks made many observers think that Australia was considering a policy shift on Burma. Unlike most Western democratic countries, Australia previously believed it could persuade the junta with friendly "limited engagement" to respect human rights and restore democracy in Burma. Australia never held much faith in isolating Burma and has continued to maintain diplomatic ties with Rangoon..."
Author/creator: Dr Myint Cho
Language: English
Source/publisher: "The Irrawaddy" Vol. 10, No. 8
Format/size: html
Alternate URLs: http://www.irrawaddy.org/opinion_story.php?art_id=2735
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: Don't Expect Junta to Respect Human Rights
Date of publication: 22 August 2000
Description/subject: Will Australia's approach to the human rights problems in Burma succeed where others have failed? No, writes Josef Silverstein.
Author/creator: Josef Silverstein
Language: English
Source/publisher: "The Australian"
Date of entry/update: 03 June 2003


Title: Radio Australia Burmese service launches
Description/subject: Radio Australia’s new Burmese language service began on 9th November 2009, with two news broadcasts. Radio Australia’s Chief Executive, Hanh Tran, said Burma’s elections next year and increased international attention on the military-led country prompted the decision to start the new radio service.
Language: Burmese,English
Source/publisher: Australia Network/Radio Australia
Format/size: html
Alternate URLs: http://blogs.rnw.nl/medianetwork/radio-australia-begins-burma-broadcasts
Date of entry/update: 14 October 2010